Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Royal Nurse Commits Suicide After Prank Radio Call Options · View
crazydiamond
Posted: Saturday, December 08, 2012 5:31:57 PM

Rank: Clever Gem

Joined: 7/17/2011
Posts: 2,285
Location: Exactly where I should be!, Canada
vtcmr wrote:


I disagree with you, I wouldn't blame them for humiliating her, I don't believe they were malicious. I think most people would agree there. Their intent was not to hurt her, it was simply to see if they could fake an accent good enough to get past a hospital famous for its privacy for their amusement. I don't know about blaming the media, I haven't really read too much about it, except one article on the fact that the call happened (this website is the first i've heard of the suicide), but with the state of the world's media as it is, I wouldn't be surprised to hear that they acted callously.

On driving to get from A to B, IMHO, that's irrelevant. You're putting others at risk (though maybe infinitesimal) for your own gain (though you could argue it's to facilitate your own survival if you only use it for a long commute for the closest job you could get to allow good odds of survival). The pranksters also put her at risk for their own gain, in this case, their amusement. They didn't think, but nor do you when you take a drive to somewhere for a holiday/break, for example. It just happens. For that reason, I wouldn't blame them for humiliating her. I just don't think they saw that as a possible outcome. They just wanted a bit of a laugh and they just went with it. This wasn't a bully/victim scenario, as prinicpessa seems to think. It was a joke that went sour.


yes i agree to that, yes harsh maybe, but if the outcome was not a suicide, this would not be in the think tank NOW!

principessa
Posted: Saturday, December 08, 2012 5:48:56 PM

Rank: Sophisticate

Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 3,940
Location: Canada
vtcmr wrote:

This wasn't a bully/victim scenario, as prinicpessa seems to think. It was a joke that went sour.


A joke happens when everyone is laughing. Not this time, even before the suicide. It was clearly public embarassment for the entertainment of others.

And btw your driving analogy is not an analogy at all.

I would like to see the reactions of people who think this is okay if they were the object of some prank that went viral making them look stupid or ridiculous. I suspect that although some of you might like the attention, you would not like this kind of attention very much. Perhaps you can only imagine yourselves as the perpetrators laughing and saying it was all in fun and telling your victims to lighten up. Some empathy and emotional intelligence is required to be a decent human being.



malebox
Posted: Saturday, December 08, 2012 6:16:15 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 3/5/2009
Posts: 164
Location: United States
There must be more to this event than we know. Answering the prank telephone call and passing it along to the floor nurse is insufficient reason to take one's own life. While it is unfortunately too late to help her, others can learn from this that you should not take work too seriously.
ArtMan
Posted: Saturday, December 08, 2012 10:47:57 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/29/2011
Posts: 638
Location: South Florida, United States
The radio deejays were way over the line on this one. They are no better than the scum that work as paparrazi.

You are invited to read Passionate Danger, Part II, a story collaboration by Kim and ArtMan.
http://www.lushstories.com/stories/straight-sex/passionate-danger-part-ii.aspx

WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 10:29:22 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,216
Location: Cakeland, United States
vtcmr wrote:


I disagree with you, I wouldn't blame them for humiliating her, I don't believe they were malicious. I think most people would agree there. Their intent was not to hurt her, it was simply to see if they could fake an accent good enough to get past a hospital famous for its privacy for their amusement.
This wasn't a bully/victim scenario, as prinicpessa seems to think. It was a joke that went sour.


It was their intent to humiliate, harass, intimidate and bully someone. Their audience (us) who pay attention to such assclowns, feed this type of media behavior.

Principessa is spot on, again.

You don't get it, I get that much. And after glancing at your Lush profile, I now know the rest of your story.

Oblivion - you wear it well.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
overmykneenow
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 10:57:33 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/8/2010
Posts: 966
Location: United Kingdom
Here's an interesting view on the events. It's subsequently been removed from the Daily Mail website where it originated.



Warning: The opinions above are those of an anonymous individual on the internet. They are opinions, unless they're facts. They may be ill-informed, out of touch with reality or just plain stupid. They may contain traces of irony. If reading these opinions causes you to be become outraged or you start displaying the symptoms of outrage, stop reading them immediately. If symptoms persist, consult a psychiatrist.

Why not read some stories instead
deadlogger
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 11:17:06 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 11/2/2012
Posts: 18
Location: United Kingdom
She was one of those hypersensative types who sets herself very high standards and this incident sent her over the top. The lesson is its best not to mess around with anyone you don't know, then you can't go wrong.
elitfromnorth
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 12:08:49 PM

Rank: Brawling Berserker

Joined: 2/12/2012
Posts: 1,589
Location: Burrowed, Norway
vtcmr wrote:


I disagree with you, I wouldn't blame them for humiliating her, I don't believe they were malicious. I think most people would agree there. Their intent was not to hurt her, it was simply to see if they could fake an accent good enough to get past a hospital famous for its privacy for their amusement. I don't know about blaming the media, I haven't really read too much about it, except one article on the fact that the call happened (this website is the first i've heard of the suicide), but with the state of the world's media as it is, I wouldn't be surprised to hear that they acted callously.

On driving to get from A to B, IMHO, that's irrelevant. You're putting others at risk (though maybe infinitesimal) for your own gain (though you could argue it's to facilitate your own survival if you only use it for a long commute for the closest job you could get to allow good odds of survival). The pranksters also put her at risk for their own gain, in this case, their amusement. They didn't think, but nor do you when you take a drive to somewhere for a holiday/break, for example. It just happens. For that reason, I wouldn't blame them for humiliating her. I just don't think they saw that as a possible outcome. They just wanted a bit of a laugh and they just went with it. This wasn't a bully/victim scenario, as prinicpessa seems to think. It was a joke that went sour.


Like WMM said, humiliating her was exactly what they were gunning for. Her and the entire hospital. They hoped they would get a juicy result like this and that's exactly what they got. Very little goes better on air than when you humiliate someone. Are the radio DJ's honestly that short sighted that they'd think the nurse and staff and administration in a hospital that prides itself on privacy for their patients would go "Hahaha, that was a good one They really got us there." If they're that retarded then they shouldn't be allowed on the radio.

The DJ's properly broke the ehtical guidelines by humiliating a private person publically. Sure, we have free speech and they can't be take down for it(unless they were in the US, then the lawsuit that Buz mentioned would be in order), but there should still be guidelines for them to follow so shit like this doesn't happen. And the result we see now was simply unavoidable at some point. Who knows how much baggage she has, they certainly didn't, and THAT is exactly why they shouldn't try to humilate her in public.

tl;dr (too long, didn't read) Her blood is on their hands.

"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
Mazza
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 12:59:53 PM

Rank: Mazztastic

Joined: 9/20/2012
Posts: 2,855
Location: Scotland, United Kingdom
elitfromnorth wrote:


Like WMM said, humiliating her was exactly what they were gunning for. Her and the entire hospital. They hoped they would get a juicy result like this and that's exactly what they got. Very little goes better on air than when you humiliate someone. Are the radio DJ's honestly that short sighted that they'd think the nurse and staff and administration in a hospital that prides itself on privacy for their patients would go "Hahaha, that was a good one They really got us there." If they're that retarded then they shouldn't be allowed on the radio.

The DJ's properly broke the ehtical guidelines by humiliating a private person publically. Sure, we have free speech and they can't be take down for it(unless they were in the US, then the lawsuit that Buz mentioned would be in order), but there should still be guidelines for them to follow so shit like this doesn't happen. And the result we see now was simply unavoidable at some point. Who knows how much baggage she has, they certainly didn't, and THAT is exactly why they shouldn't try to humilate her in public.

tl;dr (too long, didn't read) Her blood is on their hands.


You can't blame them for HER decision to take her own life. As has been said before, yes, this incident probably had some bearing on her subsequent actions, but we cannot know that, not for certain. Who knows what else was going on in her life?

It was her decision to take her own life.

Shit happens every day, it's up to us how we choose to react to it.

principessa
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 1:59:23 PM

Rank: Sophisticate

Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 3,940
Location: Canada
With respect, please reread what DD, Elit, WMM and I wrote. Not knowing what is going on in someone's life is precisely why this was so bad. Their intentions were not to make the hospital staff look good. On the contrary, they wanted to humiliate, embarass, and ridicule, showing whoever answered their call to be a gullible fool. What is funny about that?

There are people who enjoy constant attention and imagine that everything that happens to them is of interest to others. Most people are not like that. Their problems and heartache are their own. They go to work every day and do their best, holding on by a thread to normalcy. The djs cut that thread for this woman.

Even if this had not happened, what the djs did would have jeopardized the jobs of the people they pranked. Never mind the breach of privacy they attempted. Of course they had no idea it would end like this, but they did not think about the consequences, even taking the suicide out of the equation. I just hope that their suspension is without pay.





AbigailThornton
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 2:11:47 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 7/8/2012
Posts: 655
Location: The naughty little world inside my head, United Ki
It reminds me of Dr David Kelly's suicide - the weapon's expert who was named as the source of the stories that raised concerns over the way the British government presented its case for war with Iraq. When ordinary members of the public suddenly find themselves at the centre of a media frenzy there's no telling what will happen. Some people thrive on the attention, some simply can't cope.

Guest
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 2:38:29 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 473,817
The last few comments have put this sad story into perspective, the "prank" was (even without the tragic consequences) rather pathetic with the clear intention to "embarrass" someone. Some of us would laugh and some wouldn't. This would be an individuals choice, my view would be to maybe sigh and think about the poor soul who was duped. And it would probably be forgotten. Hardly a tale to recount at the dinner table. So we have the prank, then we must consider the effects.

I agree that the DJ's were not directly responsible, a contributory factor no doubt.

The nurse took her own life, for reasons only she really knew. As tragic as the consequences were, the reasons for suicide are rarely straightforward.

Perhaps and I hope this isn't too crass, the issue of mental health will take center stage and not two DJ's nor whether they were responsible.

Another penn'rth worth from me.

Guest
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 2:50:22 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 473,817
Blaming the DJs and radio station for this woman's suicide is like blaming a fork for an obese man. It gets even more ridiculous if she answered the call and passed it to another person on the "royal" floor. How by any stretch of the imagination can you blame someone else for a person's suicide? They held the gun/pill/jumped/whatever. Not one person forced her to do it. Sure, I pity anyone that decides to take their own lives. For a second I do, then I'm pissed off at their selfishness. There is almost always someone left behind, alive, that will wonder, grieve, and have to live with that pain forever. She's dead. It's over for her. Her children and husband, parents, sibs and friends are left with the bewilderment and pain for the rest of their lives. That she would rather be dead than be with them to seek comfort, help and peace? No. It is not anyone else's fault but her own.
Guest
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 4:06:45 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 473,817
chefkathleen wrote:
Blaming the DJs and radio station for this woman's suicide is like blaming a fork for an obese man. It gets even more ridiculous if she answered the call and passed it to another person on the "royal" floor. How by any stretch of the imagination can you blame someone else for a person's suicide? They held the gun/pill/jumped/whatever. Not one person forced her to do it. Sure, I pity anyone that decides to take their own lives. For a second I do, then I'm pissed off at their selfishness. There is almost always someone left behind, alive, that will wonder, grieve, and have to live with that pain forever. She's dead. It's over for her. Her children and husband, parents, sibs and friends are left with the bewilderment and pain for the rest of their lives. That she would rather be dead than be with them to seek comfort, help and peace? No. It is not anyone else's fault but her own.


Regardless of what caused her to commit suicide you said that she 'took the easy way out' and thus was a 'weak woman'.

.......... I can't imagine even being able to say that. Normally this kind of thing would make me feel angry or frustrated...but I don't even feel anything because I'm so stunned that people feel able to say something like.... well... that.

Someone committing suicide makes you 'pissed off at their selfishness'?

.... I can't even REPLY to that. dontknow
LadyX
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 4:47:29 PM

Rank: Thread Mediator

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,678
Location: United States
The most interesting active threads here tend to reveal a lot more about us, the participants, than about the supposed subject at hand. This one's a prime example.
freakycactus
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 5:07:10 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 5/12/2010
Posts: 409
Location: On my cloud, United Kingdom
chefkathleen wrote:
That she would rather be dead than be with them to seek comfort, help and peace? No. It is not anyone else's fault but her own.


I'm struggling to find the words to respond to this for the same reason as Little Bambi. I've known someone threaten suicide as a cry for help, only to be told by a medical professional that the only way he would be able to get the help he needed was by attempting suicide. Otherwise, the waiting lists would be so long he wouldn't get the help he needed in time.

You're assuming that this woman hadn't sought help, you're assuming that she was capable of dealing with her issues well enough to seek help, to ask for it.

The very idea that suicide is the 'easy way out', a 'selfish choice', is narrow minded and ignorant. It is the last option, people commit suicide when they can't think of any other way to make things better. They often believe that the world will be better without them, that their family and friends will be better without them. That thought process might not make sense to you, but someone who has suicidal thoughts often isn't thinking too clearly because they have serious issues that they need help dealing with.

It takes a hell of a lot for a person to ask for help, too many people can't find the words and too often they don't realise that there's something wrong; they're so used to feeling that way that they think there's something wrong with them for not dealing with things better.

vtcmr
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 5:15:44 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 8/16/2012
Posts: 20
WellMadeMale - I doubt it was their intention to intimidate, harass or bully her. Nor do I think they meant to humiliate her, I think they just wanted to call somewhere where they had no access and get a laugh out of it. I'm sure most people understand the appeal of gaining access to somewhere you're not supposed to have access to. It's why so many hackers just hack for the thrill of it and certainly not to humiliate the people they hacked. If the nurse hadn't taken her life, people would just be talking about how the hospital is not worthy of its reputation, and if you think they're evil for ruining the hospital's reputation, then ask yourself if you'd be saying the same thing, had they revealed the incompetence of a politician who later took his life. I do NOT believe they did it, consciously thinking, "ha, how funny would it be if we could make this woman look stupid on national radio?"
As for knowing the rest of my story, what the hell is that supposed to mean? You do not know me at all. To assume you know me because of a look at my profile is entirely wrong.

As malebox says, what she did is insufficient reason to take her life. It's possible that the prank didn't even play a minor part in her decision and I'd be willing to bet that. Just because it happened immediately after the media attention, that doesn't imply any causation.

principessa - Please deconstruct my driving analogy! You do however, make a good point about the fact that they didn't think this through, even barring the suicide. They put people's jobs at risk, breached a sick person's privacy, etc. That, however, was the only thing they did wrong.

deadlogger - If we are basing our actions on what can go wrong, then you should just stay inside today. Probably just lay in bed. So much goes wrong in one day.

elitfromnorth - Her blood is on her own hands. That's sad and tragic, but it's the truth. If she really took her life over taking the call and not having anything to do with the security issue, then she probably would have taken it tomorrow anyway.

chefkathleen - I understand why you'd be pissed at the selfishness of a suicidal person, but we need to think about both sides. Maybe the pain they're experiencing is more than the pain the family will experience if they died. Sometimes, people's lives are just shitty and they see no way out of the situation. Depression is a mental illness and many people don't understand it like they do physical illnesses. They say things like, "stop moaning, you've got everything in life", or, "just do some things to take your mind off it", or, "cheer up, it's not the end of the world!" The problem is, depression can happen to anyone, no matter what they've got and depressed people stop enjoying the things they used to like doing. The dopamine just doesn't hit their brain and they can't just "cheer up". They are in a rut and see no way out of it. When you're in that much pain, the last thing on your mind is anyone else. Sometimes, they feel as though their friends/family doesn't understand them or doesn't care, which is especially easy to think when they're telling you to cheer up or "suck it up, because everyone has problems and is stressed."

All that being said, suicide *is* the easy way out. When you're depressed though, I wouldn't blame you. There's *no shame* in taking the easy way. I'm betting many of you drive, or use lifts, or like to automate things. The easy way out is the logical way out.

SUMMARY
–––––––––
- She took the easy way out - I don't blame her.
- The DJs likely had nothing to do with her suicide. If you listen to the call, she actually did nothing wrong. Plus, it was her own choice to end her life.
- The DJs weren't looking to humiliate anyone, but instead the thrill of gaining access to an unauthorised area.
- The DJs are to blame for not thinking this through - the suicide is not the whole story, they DID breach a sick person's privacy and endanger jobs.
- While I'm not a fan of the Royal family (for various reasons we won't get into), I commend them for not complaining to the hospital about something they had a right to complain about.
Mazza
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 5:37:14 PM

Rank: Mazztastic

Joined: 9/20/2012
Posts: 2,855
Location: Scotland, United Kingdom
principessa wrote:
With respect, please reread what DD, Elit, WMM and I wrote. Not knowing what is going on in someone's life is precisely why this was so bad. Their intentions were not to make the hospital staff look good. On the contrary, they wanted to humiliate, embarass, and ridicule, showing whoever answered their call to be a gullible fool. What is funny about that?

There are people who enjoy constant attention and imagine that everything that happens to them is of interest to others. Most people are not like that. Their problems and heartache are their own. They go to work every day and do their best, holding on by a thread to normalcy. The djs cut that thread for this woman.

Even if this had not happened, what the djs did would have jeopardized the jobs of the people they pranked. Never mind the breach of privacy they attempted. Of course they had no idea it would end like this, but they did not think about the consequences, even taking the suicide out of the equation. I just hope that their suspension is without pay.


That doesn't change anything PP. Firstly, I don't think that you 'get' the humour. I am pretty certain that they were going for a cheap laugh at the expense of the Royal Family, not to humiliate some random "Jane Doe". We see stuff like this all of the time. This nurse was not the target of the prank. (I'm not saying that it's to my taste either, but I can see what they were getting at).

Whatever this woman's reasons were for ending her own life, they were her own reasons. Now, whether this 'prank' pushed her over the edge or not (and sure, the way it's been portrayed here, yes it looks like it may have) but we cannot KNOW that. None of us knows why she took her own life. If her decision was made to commit suicide then it could have been the call, maybe someone was rude to her, maybe she had an abusive husband, a terminal disease who knows? Certainly not me, or you or anyone in this thread or the media. It is pure speculation.

As far as I am aware, the hospital and the British Royal Family apportioned no blame whatsoever on this woman or indeed the hospital and again, from what I have read, all she did was to transfer a call to another department/ward, so, what is wrong with that? I am fairly certain that no jobs were ever in jeopardy, PP.

The Royal Family here in the United Kingdom are renowned for not getting involved in frivolous lawsuits and as such to tend to be the butt of more than their fair share of jokes etc. In fairness, I think it's a good policy, hell they'd never be out of court, would they? I think that there was a case recently where a royal did take action, but I can't remember what it was for. Point being that as such, they can be seen as an 'easy target' for pranksters and they've certainly been satirized plenty on television, radio and what not. The prank itself was not a big deal, not in the grand scheme of things and certainly nothing new, we've seen it all before.

The DJs were dicks, sure, but I don't think that there was anything sinister in their 'prank'. It could have backfired in other ways too. What if Kate had lost her baby, went into miscarriage? The joke would have seemed tasteless then too, wouldn't it?

Now, you said something about not knowing what goes on in someone's life.... Well of course we don't know these things. Does that mean that if I'm having a bad day and some random telemarketer calls me and annoys or upsets me and then as a result I'm in a shit mood and go and pick a fight with my husband, or beat on my kids that it's their fault?? NO, does it fuck!

Does it mean that we should not say things to people, just in case it's the 'wrong' thing to say? No, of course not.

If this woman was in such a fragile situation, then perhaps she should not have been at work in the first place, in a caring/healing profession where she might have been in charge of the welfare of others/patients. I mean, if I was teetering on the verge of deciding whether to live or die then I think that I wouldn't really give a fuck about some phone call...


keoloke
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 5:37:49 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/12/2010
Posts: 560
Location: United States
This tread can go rightfully on and on with the many views. Besides the obvious tragedy, it remain the fact (this proves it) that Djs are going waaaay too far.

In the NY areas they call peoples promising to be a new flowers delivery company saying that they will send free roses to whoever they wish. The purpose is to see if the person would be sending it to someone other than their legal partner or significant other. Therefore possibly uncovering a cheating. Most of the calls are extremely disturbing. I cannot even only listen to them. I have no idea how they call pull this off.

As is been said in this thread, it's not entertaining at all.. to me. You actually feel compassion for the person who is actually "wrong" for being the cheater, not the other way around. What we have became.
I always thought that someday, someone will go outside the radio station and wait for them to walk out

After what has happened and at a global level, I’ll say wait and see... for some “over the air regulations”




Choose n Practice Happiness

Life is simple; we are what we eat and what we read. Talk is superfluous.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 6:18:42 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,216
Location: Cakeland, United States
vtcmr wrote:
SUMMARY


Don't quit your day job.

A psychologist/analyst/thoughtful person -- you are not.


If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
dodger51
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 6:19:21 PM

Rank: Rookie Scribe

Joined: 11/5/2012
Posts: 1
Location: Oxford, United Kingdom
I am sorry I cannot condone the actions of the DJ's, supposedly inteligent people ? - one wonders.
NO ONE should be placed in a position where they could lose their jobs or have their livelyhood destroyed for FUN OR FOR THE AMUSMENT OF OTHERS.

It is not suprising the poor person was or felt themselves to be under pressure, I can only offer my heartfelt sympathy to her family.
tazznjazz
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 6:50:54 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/30/2012
Posts: 329
Location: under bright lights, United States
I've not heard anyone have much compassion for the D.J.'s who reportedly are devastated that their prank went so far astray. While the prank was in very bad taste, they now have to live with the burden of guilt for the rest their lives over a joke that certainly wasn't meant to have such a tragic outcome.

The families and loved ones left behind also have my deepest sympathy.
vtcmr
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:07:32 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 8/16/2012
Posts: 20
WellMadeMale wrote:


Don't quit your day job.

A psychologist/analyst/thoughtful person -- you are not.


Can we stop with the name calling? You're using ad hominem attacks that don't strengthen your argument. Seriously? You don't even know who I am, so I wouldn't be so quick to make assumptions like that. I am NOT a psychologist, but I doubt everyone here is, and noone set prerequisites for this thread. Seriously, dismantle my arguments or shut the fuck up.

Mazza wrote:

I am pretty certain that they were going for a cheap laugh at the expense of the Royal Family, not to humiliate some random "Jane Doe".


Thank you!

Mazza wrote:

I think that there was a case recently where a royal did take action, but I can't remember what it was for.

Off-topic, but I think it was Prince Harry naked photos being published.

Mazza wrote:

Now, you said something about not knowing what goes on in someone's life.... Well of course we don't know these things. Does that mean that if I'm having a bad day and some random telemarketer calls me and annoys or upsets me and then as a result I'm in a shit mood and go and pick a fight with my husband, or beat on my kids that it's their fault?? NO, does it fuck!

Again, thank you! You're one of the few people in this thread who seem to be making sense. Sometimes, I think people are just so afraid of saying something when a person commits suicide, it's one of those taboo subjects.

crazydiamond wrote:

I am not saying what the dj's did was correct or ok in any way, but neither is a witch hunt.

Again, thank you!

principessa wrote:

It was clearly public embarassment for the entertainment of others.

WellMadeMale wrote:

It was their intent to humiliate, harass, intimidate and bully someone.

elitfromnorth wrote:

Like WMM said, humiliating her was exactly what they were gunning for.

See what Mazza said, above.

LittleBambi wrote:

Suicide is absolutely not the 'easy way out'. Suicide occurs when the mind has no where else to turn but upon itself.

Exactly! When the mind has nowhere to turn to but upon itself, isn't that saying that the person has only one choice that they see as the obvious choice? Thus making it easy for them? They regard themselves as useless and all of these negative things fill their minds. When you've got nothing left in this world, how can you say it's not easy to take your life? Like I said before, a suicidal person has two options: continue living their miserable life, or nothingness. Any logical person would choose nothingness.

As for her being a weak person, I think people think that when the living say that of the suicidal, that we're looking down on them. I can't speak for everyone, but that is certainly not the case for me. I doubt I would be able to hold up if I was depressed with demons in my head, I am simply making an observation that the suicidal couldn't handle their demons, not that I could.
VanGogh
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:09:42 PM

Rank: Sarcastic Coffee Aficionado

Joined: 2/10/2012
Posts: 2,776
Location: Vancouver, Canada
LadyX wrote:
The most interesting active threads here tend to reveal a lot more about us, the participants, than about the supposed subject at hand. This one's a prime example.


Very true LadyX ... Yet I am still taken aback with the ice that runs in some veins.


For the Anal Lovers .... come enjoy my RR honoured An Alluring Ass

Another Sex in the Office Poem (I know you love those!!) In Your Office

* * * * * *
"The supreme accomplishment is to blur the line between work and play." - Arnold J. Toynbee
“Everything you can imagine is real.” - Pablo Picasso
WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:18:00 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,216
Location: Cakeland, United States
vtcmr wrote:

Can we stop with the name calling? You're using ad hominem attacks that don't strengthen your argument. Seriously? You don't even know who I am, so I wouldn't be so quick to make assumptions like that. I am NOT a psychologist, but I doubt everyone here is, and noone set prerequisites for this thread. Seriously, dismantle my arguments or shut the fuck up.


I've yet to call you any names. Yet.

You've done a pretty good job of painting yourself into a corner which you cannot dodge out of, you don't require assistance from anyone else.

Please, continue...



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
TraceyAmes
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:26:07 PM

Rank: Wine Connoisseur

Joined: 6/28/2008
Posts: 162
Location: Hunter Valley, Australia
I am Australian and what happened is a tragedy. Before anybody plays a joke on another person, they should stop and consider the consequences. In this case the consequences resulted in a needless suicide. I feel for the woman who died and for her family. The perpetrators of the hoax are blood-guilty of the woman's death and as such are the main ones to blame.

The hospital also has some guilt in the matter as well. There are protocols to be adhered to and all staff should be aware of what can be done or what is not acceptable. Several DJ's on Australian radio lately have made very nasty, acidic remarks to innocent people including Julia Gillard, the Prime Minister of Australia by Alan Jones. Other abhorrent DJ's include Kyle Sandilands and John Laws. I believe that these radio stations should have very strict laws and boundaries in their talk back shows. If they do not comply, then they should be sacked.

Another outspoken Australian is the former Premier of Victoria, Jeff Kennett. He is currently the CEO od Beyond Blue, an organization for depression leading to suicide and other personal problems. This same guy said it was alright for the two people involved in the Royal nurse hoax to do what they did and that they did nothing wrong. That guy should be sacked immediately and left to rot in a sanatorium.

May God be with the family of the nurse who died.
elitfromnorth
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:29:29 PM

Rank: Brawling Berserker

Joined: 2/12/2012
Posts: 1,589
Location: Burrowed, Norway
The media sit with a responsibility. As a journalist should you be aware of that the decisions you make, what you broadcast, print or publish could have effects on people, especially when private persons are targeted. Sure, public persons may handle a joke like that, but that's because they expect it. A private person shouldn't have to worry about being humiliated at their workplace by a radiohost doing a prank call.

Their intentions was exactly to humiliate. That's what they wanted. That's the kind of humour that sells. Look at all the youtube videos around with people being humiliated. We love being entertained by that crap. It doesn't matter what age or gender or anything like that, as long as it's someone we don't know or don't care about we don't mind listening to someone being humiliated.

How the hell could this be on the expense of the royal family? Were they expecting to be allowed to talk to Kate? If not then the royal family weren't involved(apart from who they wanted to play). Then they might as well have pretended to order flowers from the local florist and send. The excuses for them I see in here are so thin even a fly would make them break.

If you drive at 90 mph in a 70 mph zone and you hit someone and kill them, you will still get more time in jail than if you were speeding. Why? Because you were reckless. Sure, the person walking in the road is to blame too, but maybe if you hadn't been speeding then you could have avoided hitting the person. Maybe, just maybe, if they hadn't been so stupid as to make the call then she wouldn't have killed herself.

And no, the radio dj's won't get any sympathy from me, same way I won't give any sympathy to a someone killing someone while driving too fast. We all have to live with our decisions(no pun intended), let them live with theirs.

"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
Guest
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:37:41 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 473,817
Mazza wrote:



As far as I am aware, the hospital and the British Royal Family apportioned no blame whatsoever on this woman or indeed the hospital and again, from what I have read, all she did was to transfer a call to another department/ward, so, what is wrong with that? I am fairly certain that no jobs were ever in jeopardy, PP.


FYI: By releasing confidential patient information and forwarding the call, the Royal Nurse violated HIPPA. HIPPA requires hospitals and health care providers to maintain absolute confidentiality of their patients' protected health information; it is Health care 101.

Her mistake could have had severe penalties including fines, criminal sentencing, and disciplinary action by licensing boards and employers. This was a high profile situation and her young career as a nurse (4 years) could have very well been over.

In my humble opinion, that mistake mirrored with world-wide public humiliation could have easily taken her over the edge.




principessa
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 7:52:04 PM

Rank: Sophisticate

Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 3,940
Location: Canada
WickedGood wrote:


FYI: By releasing confidential patient information and forwarding the call, the Royal Nurse violated HIPPA. HIPPA requires hospitals and health care providers to maintain absolute confidentiality of their patients' protected health information; it is Health care 101.

Her mistake could have had severe penalties including fines, criminal sentencing, and disciplinary action by licensing boards and employers. This was a high profile situation and her young career as a nurse (4 years) could have very well been over.

In my humble opinion, that mistake mirrored with world-wide public humiliation could have easily taken her over the edge.



Thank you. That was precisely my point and is the same worldwide. Patient confidentiality is sacrosanct and reason to lose a professional licence if breached. However, there is no point trying explain this any more to those who think it was fun. They are the target audience for this.

Rembacher
Posted: Sunday, December 09, 2012 8:00:22 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/16/2008
Posts: 1,101
For those who have not read up on the issue, I think it is important to note that the nurse who took her own life was not the one who revealed the information. That being said, if she was on the switchboard that night, it was probably her responsibility to screen the calls. If she was in charge of screening the calls, then it is completely understandable that she would feel responsible for the punishment the other nurse would receive for revealing private /confidential information about a patient. The nurse who revealed the information most likely assumed that if the call made it through the switchboard, it was legit.

Personal embarrassment would be bad enough. Knowing that you contributed to someone else facing professional reprimand or even losing their job, would be far worse for an empathetic person. Still probably not enough on its own to cause a suicide, but, potentially enough to push her over the edge if her job was her last refuge from her troubles.
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.