Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Active shooters in schools: The enemy is denial. Options · View
MrNudiePants
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2012 10:37:48 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/10/2009
Posts: 2,141
Location: United States
Quote:
“How many kids have been killed by school fire in all of North America in the past 50 years? Kids killed... school fire... North America... 50 years... How many? Zero. That’s right. Not one single kid has been killed by school fire anywhere in North America in the past half a century. Now, how many kids have been killed by school violence?”


Quote:
“In 1998,” Grossman said, “school violence claimed what at the time was an all time record number of kids’ lives. In that year there were 35 dead and a quarter of a million serious injuries due to violence in the school. How many killed by fire that year? Zero. But we hear people say, ‘That’s the year Columbine happened, that’s an anomaly.’ Well, in 2004 we had a new all time record — 48 dead in the schools from violence. How many killed by fire that year? Zero. Let’s assign some grades. Put your teacher hat on and give out some grades. What kind of grade do you give the firefighter for keeping kids safe? An ‘A,’ right? Reluctantly, reluctantly, the cops give the firefighters an ‘A,’ right? Danged firefighters, they sleep ‘till they’re hungry and eat ‘till they’re tired. What grade do we get for keeping the kids safe from violence? Come on, what’s our grade? Needs improvement, right?”


Quote:
Grossman commanded, “Look up at the ceiling! See all those sprinklers up there? They’re hard to spot — they’re painted black — but they’re there. While you’re looking, look at the material the ceiling is made of. You know that that stuff was selected because it’s fire-retardant. Hooah? Now look over there above the door — you see that fire exit sign? That’s not just any fire exit sign — that’s a ‘battery-backup-when-the-world-ends-it-will-still-be-lit’ fire exit sign. Hooah?”

Walking from the stage toward a nearby fire exit and exterior wall, Grossman slammed the palm of his hand against the wall and exclaimed, “Look at these wall boards! They were chosen because they’re what?! Fireproof or fire retardant, hooah? There is not one stinking thing in this room that will burn!”

Pointing around the room as he spoke, Grossman continued, “But you’ve still got those fire sprinklers, those fire exit signs, fire hydrants outside, and fire trucks nearby! Are these fire guys crazy? Are these fire guys paranoid? No! This fire guy is our A+ student! Because this fire guy has redundant, overlapping layers of protection, not a single kid has been killed by school fire in the last 50 years!


Quote:
“But you try to prepare for violence — the thing much more likely to kill our kids in schools, the thing hundreds of times more likely to kill our kids in schools — and people think you’re paranoid. They think you’re crazy. ...They’re in denial.”


Quote:
“Come with me to the library at Columbine High School,” Grossman said. “The teacher in the library at Columbine High School spent her professional lifetime preparing for a fire, and we can all agree if there had been a fire in that library, that teacher would have instinctively, reflexively known what to do.

"But the thing most likely to kill her kids — the thing hundreds of times more likely to kill her kids, the teacher didn’t have a clue what to do. She should have put those kids in the librarian’s office but she didn’t know that. So she did the worst thing possible — she tried to secure her kids in an un-securable location. She told the kids to hide in the library — a library that has plate glass windows for walls. It’s an aquarium, it’s a fish bowl. She told the kids to hide in a fishbowl. What did those killers see? They saw targets. They saw fish in a fish bowl.”

Grossman said that if the school administrators at Columbine had spent a fraction of the money they’d spent preparing for fire doing lockdown drills and talking with local law enforcers about the violent dangers they face, the outcome that day may have been different.

Rhetorically he asked the assembled cops, “If somebody had spent five minutes telling that teacher what to do, do you think lives would have been saved at Columbine?”



More at this link.

Guest
Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 9:32:53 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 534,741
It has taken years for officials to get to the point of flame retardant walls, ceilings,carpet and other things like that in schools and other public places. It's going to take them years to teach and prepare employees for attacks such as what's been happening in these schools and movies theaters as well. People prefer to bury their heads in the sand and go around their ass to get to their elbow in preventing these tragedies. After they've talked it to death and there are more deaths in schools, they might, just Might start to look at something like this. So more children and educators will have to die first before it happens.
Buz
Posted: Thursday, December 20, 2012 7:48:59 PM

Rank: The Linebacker

Joined: 3/2/2011
Posts: 5,778
Location: Atlanta, United States
When will society take a realistic look at the root of the problem?

What makes someone want to be a mass killer? What influences their lives to make such decisions? What are the common social links from U. of Texas to Columbine to Virginia Tech to Newtown, etc? Why are they so desensitized to death and blood shed? Why do they have so little regard for human life? What factors made them the person they are?

tazznjazz
Posted: Friday, December 21, 2012 8:12:36 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/30/2012
Posts: 329
Location: under bright lights, United States
One influence I haven't seen mentioned much in the think tank is the gang/thug/rap culture that at times glorifies guns, crime and violence. I think it's every bit as much a negative factor as movie/video games, but not even close to the surface of the the solution. Eliminating access to lethal assault weapons and better recognition of those that need mental heath care and follow through treatment to helping those people lead a less troubled life is the best start.

I don't think anyone believes we can totally stop these incidents from happening, but we can and should do our utmost to try to reduce them if possible.
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.