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Does a writer's gender make a difference? Options · View
Sensei
Posted: Saturday, June 09, 2012 6:15:29 PM

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sprite wrote:


mine [cat] can *nods* she actually writes some of my better stories for me :)


This just screams for a Mrs. Slocomb style cat/pussy joke. :)

My novel, The Society, is available now in the Kindle Store: http://www.amazon.com/The-Society-ebook/dp/B00BPF9U2I
LustyBusty
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2012 1:26:02 AM

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happy8 Well, it shouldn't matter the gender so long as the story is good. Personally, it doesn't matter to me what gender the writer is. I've read crappy stories written by both female and male writers and I've read really amazing stories from writers of both genders. I think the reason why a female writer gets so many good reviews on writing a 'dirty' story is because it's not expected. I mean, women have been writing erotic stories for decades now and still it's sort of a taboo thing when they get in depth and really dirty. With men it's expected and it's not that the stories that men write aren't good it's just that we know that for the most part they have no problem getting raunchy with their words. So.. yea, that's the way I see it. I still think it shouldn't matter though.

Just do it! Life won't wait for you and I don't think I will either!
Guest
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2012 10:54:02 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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Good writing transcends gender or sexual orientation.
Jayne33
Posted: Sunday, July 01, 2012 1:56:19 AM

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Location: on my laptop, United Kingdom
[quote=LustyBusty]happy8Personally, it doesn't matter to me what gender the writer is. I've read crappy stories written by both female and male writers and I've read really amazing stories from writers of both genders.

This is so true! - It doesnt really matter what sex the writer is if they are a good writer.

It also depends on what pov you want a story from, I enjoy reading stories from men as if gives me an idea of what it feels like for them.

I find it easier to write from a womans point of view as I can use my past experience to draw from.


A Trans Atlantic Affair By Milik Redman & Jayne33


Unexpected By Jayne33
adele
Posted: Monday, July 30, 2012 10:25:14 AM

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My stories are written from a women's pov, though within some of them (none on here though) are scenes written from a male pov. Just like the scenes describing sex between women, these male perspective scenes come from my imagination, as I have neither experienced lesbian sex, nor am I a male. I have had both types read by the appropriate people and have been told I have gotten it mostly correct. Not everyone is able to write well from the perspective of their own gender, let alone the opposite gender. Overall, I feel if a story is well written, the gender does not matter.

There is no mark of self,
And no mark of others,
No mark of living beings,
And no mark of a life.


-- The Diamond Sutra
RobinMaxwell760
Posted: Monday, July 30, 2012 12:32:50 PM

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My response is coming very late as I am new to Lushstories, and I think most avenues has been persured fully. I can only add that it makes no difference where the genitalia of the author is located to me. A great story gets a 5, good story gets a 4. If I have to go below 3, I just won't because I'm not a critic and don't get paid to verbally destroy someones life. I try to always leave a comment if I give a score, I think that's fair.

I have noticed in my wandering tho that a guy can write a fantastic story with well developed characters and interesting situations that will attract only the most ardent erotic reader. A girl with naughty pictures of herself on her profile can write a shopping list and get massive traffic and rave reviews...ironically by men mostly (Face it , fella's, ya ain't gettin' none a that, just move on solider.).

Conclusion; men by far are mostly the one at fault, something I and others that truly enjoy erotica are just going to have to live with...because I don't want anyone to take down their naughty pictures. :-)

"I understand that 'Shit happens'! I don't under stand why I have to be under it when it does!!!"
RM
TomasDeLuc4
Posted: Thursday, August 02, 2012 11:17:31 PM

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I never actually pay attention to a writer's gender when I start reading a story. I just care that it gets my attention
Icarus32
Posted: Saturday, August 25, 2012 10:33:28 AM

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Location: Around, Canada
Like everything, fantastic things can come from both genders. Personally though I find I tend to prefer stories written by females, don't ask me why, because I couldn't really tell you. However it could be something to do with the fact that in the end these stories are just our fantasies put to writing, and I would rather read the fantasy of a girl than the fantasy of another guy.
clum
Posted: Saturday, August 25, 2012 3:52:33 PM

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Quenton2123 wrote:
Like everything, fantastic things can come from both genders.


Except vaginas.

The lion is most lionlike when he roars.
Guest
Posted: Friday, August 31, 2012 11:07:15 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,086
Perhaps with erotica women might be better, but I was always under the impression that women read erotica more than men, so maybe that's why women are more prolific at writing it? As for other genres.... well, in historical fiction, both Steven Pressfield and Mary Rennault have ancient Greece market cornered. They're both in a class by theirselves in that arena. Both have written on Alexander the Great, but both also write in vastly different styles. I couldn't say I like one better more than the other, but I can't think of anyone as their equal, even Gene Wolfe's book Solider of the Mist. Barabara Tuchmann is my favorite historian (non-fiction), but most of the other writers I like are men. I don't think gender makes a difference in writing though.
stelmaria
Posted: Saturday, September 01, 2012 12:57:22 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

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The ability to string a decent sentence together is not gender-dependant. Men, Women, meh, it matters not.

Ariel21
Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2012 1:36:31 AM

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Not at all!
danni69
Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2012 4:09:49 AM

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I like story by woman better than men
malcolm83
Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2012 4:52:19 AM

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I think women are better at addressing the sensitivities and feelings in stories, making their stories hotter.
smileyum
Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2012 5:42:50 AM

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No way. I read/rate stories regardless of gender.
RumpleForeskin
Posted: Monday, September 03, 2012 6:44:17 PM

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This comes up ever so often. In my (very) humble opinion, the answer is, no. The narrator in the 'From: Becky,...' story in my sig line is young, female, and very pregnant. I'm none of those, honest.

glasses8


Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwords. - ROBERT HEINLEIN

REUNITINGhis need, her want, in a cab -- my contest entry

FROM:
Becky -- FOR: Matt -- With Love:
a Festive contest winner – honest

HOW HUMANS DO IT: a fish-eye view of sex an Editor's Pick - no kidding
lugls
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2012 2:16:32 PM

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I think if the story is hot and written by a women and is about their love for another women or her first time with a guy and she is the aggressor that is a real turn on.
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 5:46:51 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,086
No - It all depends on the way its written, good bad and indifferent comes from both sexes
kylie_kained
Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 6:20:13 PM

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Location: Over your Knee Screaming and Kicking!, United King
A lot of writers use pen names, why should here be any different. As long as the story is well written then it makes no actual difference to the outcome of any vote i give.
















Guest
Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2012 8:22:36 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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Just another vote for how well a story is written, not the writers gender. I've written under a female pen name and gotten good feedback at another site.
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2012 3:21:59 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,086
Yes it makes a difference. Not saying a good or bad difference, but I can usually tell.

flytoomuch
Posted: Saturday, December 01, 2012 5:02:32 AM

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Hmm? I haven't noticed that I react differently? I'll try to pay attention in the future since this is an interesting question. I'm more concerned with the quality of the writing and the connection I get with the story. Generally I thought men were no good at writing and then I read Jaymal and Frank Lee and......oh.......I guess guys can write? Oh yeah, Hemingway was a guy wasn't he? Tolstoy was a guy too? But what about Jane Austen? Okay I counter Jane Austen with Lawrence Durrell. Oh you counter with Virginia Woolf. Okay I trump Virginia Woolf with Charles Dickens. Oh, you're playing the Mary Shelley card? Shit this is complicated?
PhareDuFour
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2012 3:32:22 PM

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Location: United Kingdom
I wonder if you should have made a poll to obtain a clear-cut answer, because you will only end up getting a mass of personal opions, including mine.

Mine is that I need a get an emotional charge from a story to rate it. If I'm not getting it, then the story's "not doing it for me". It has less to do with gender. Personally I do prefer reading emotionally charged erotica by male authors, but as you point out, I may be in the minority.

What I don't like is reading stories which emphasize the "fuck" more than the emotional exchange between the characters - and yes, there are many male authors who write more about the "fuck" than the story. In that case - it's not erotica; it's porn - just like a porn film is porn, and not a particular movie you'll never forget.

There is another site (I won't name here) which allows posting of all kinds of stories and novels - not just erotica, but all genres - is mostly occupied by teenage girls scribbling their (incoherent, disorganised) YA erotic fantasies. Of course, they get wonderful ratings from each other, because the majority of the sight is full of other teenage girls scribbling their YA erotic fantasies, too - but that has nothing to do with quality content.

Unlike Lush, the stories are never edited or reviewd before they are uploaded. Like the saying goes in the country where I live, "Paper is patient when it comes to the amount of shit you can pile on it". That un-named site exercises little control over content or quality. But those young teenage "authors" get lots of high ratings from their girlfriends. Most of them are re-writing their fan-fiction which will always be popular. Originality is punished because it's not hip in highschool. And the secret there appears to be winning the popularity contest - not how well you can write, but rather, how loud you can toot your horn.

Si vos postulo me, sed non vis me, oportet me manere.
Sed si vis me, sed non vos postulo me, oportet me abire.
DXM
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2012 4:31:36 PM

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I'm not sure that the author's gender matters at all in theory. Certainly it doesn't when the author writes from the his or her own gender POV.

However, I do think that writing compelling fiction from the opposite sex's POV in any genre is deceptively difficult, and it takes a fair amount of both skill and empathy to pull off. A lot of writers (even best selling ones) just push ahead with their own thoughts, wishes and desires and simply attach an opposite-sex name to it; this can make the work feel stilted.

We erotica dabblers are the worst at this. I find it jarring if I'm reading an exciting and promising plot setup that, for example, has a nineteen year old college freshman who talks about her "boobies" and how all the pledges in the sorority she wants to join take their shirts off the night they meet to feel one another's "boobies." It's hard to be the reader and not immediately go from a place of "oh, we're looking at things from a young college-age woman's POV" to "we're looking at things from the POV of a man who's not spent much time in actual sororities."

It can be done, of course; many writers (including some that I am discovering here at Lush) write from the other gender's POV and create inspiring things of beauty; but it is really, really hard to pull off.
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2012 4:56:40 PM

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DXM wrote:
I'm not sure that the author's gender matters at all in theory. Certainly it doesn't when the author writes from the his or her own gender POV.

However, I do think that writing compelling fiction from the opposite sex's POV in any genre is deceptively difficult, and it takes a fair amount of both skill and empathy to pull off. A lot of writers (even best selling ones) just push ahead with their own thoughts, wishes and desires and simply attach an opposite-sex name to it; this can make the work feel stilted.

We erotica dabblers are the worst at this. I find it jarring if I'm reading an exciting and promising plot setup that, for example, has a nineteen year old college freshman who talks about her "boobies" and how all the pledges in the sorority she wants to join take their shirts off the night they meet to feel one another's "boobies." It's hard to be the reader and not immediately go from a place of "oh, we're looking at things from a young college-age woman's POV" to "we're looking at things from the POV of a man who's not spent much time in actual sororities."

It can be done, of course; many writers (including some that I am discovering here at Lush) write from the other gender's POV and create inspiring things of beauty; but it is really, really hard to pull off.


I agree, it's very difficult to pull off well.

I've written in third person from the perspective of a male character a couple of times and found that I enjoyed it. Then I decided to try something as 'male, first person' thinking it wouldn't be that much more challenging and I just got totally stumped. Creating and sustaining a credible inner dialogue/voice as the opposite gender for an entire story isn't nearly as easy as one might think.

There are some very talented authors that have done it and been successful with it though. The Gangster's Girl by LadyX is a shining example.


DXM
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2012 5:04:53 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:


I agree, it's very difficult to pull off well.

I've written in third person from the perspective of a male character a couple of times and found that I enjoyed it. Then I decided to try something as 'male, first person' thinking it wouldn't be that much more challenging and I just got totally stumped. Creating and sustaining a credible inner dialogue/voice as the opposite gender for an entire story isn't nearly as easy as one might think.

There are some very talented authors that have done it and been successful with it though. The Gangster's Girl by LadyX is a shining example.



It's funny, with your skill level I wouldn't have pegged you as one to be stumped. Which just shows, I guess, that you can be a phenomenal writer and it can still be difficult to pull off well.
DanielleX
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 12:54:50 PM

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This is an interesting question. As a writer and as someone who doesn't read erotica very much, I don't care.

I think to answer this properly, you would have to collect data on who's voting for who and maybe have a poll or something. Anecdotal stuff is unreliable.

Danielle



My new story written in collaboration with Buz Bono
vines
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2013 10:38:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 7/19/2012
Posts: 92
Location: United States
Yeah it does. For example, I just posted a story "The Stranger on Top of Me." One of the readers said it was too mechanical. Funny thing is I've never seen any story teller have there stoies flow as well as mine. I think women don't want to post a comment because they don't want people to know that they are reading it.
aussiephil
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2013 12:03:37 AM

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Joined: 6/4/2011
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Location: Mount Isa
I dont really take any notice of the gender of the writer...BUT if i enjoy a story or series of stories i will follow that auther wether they are male or female....just seems females sometimes are dirtier >:)
EDWolfe
Posted: Wednesday, February 06, 2013 9:54:50 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/5/2013
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Location: United States
Gender doesn't really affect how I like a story, partly because the nature of this site makes it impossible to determine someone's actual gender. I am a man, and my profile lists me as such, but there's nothing stopping me from going in and creating a female account with a different email address. (At least, nothing I've seen; Lush probably has some method of tracking IP addresses, or something.)

From a writing perspective, it does make a difference. I don't really write female characters because I am worried that I won't capture the emotions and experiences of my ladies the same way I can with my gentlemen. This is especially true in erotic fiction; how do I know how a woman feels arousal? I could have it described to me, but then my perception is skewed by the person who described it.
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