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Beating the Smoking Addiction? Options · View
TXhoney
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2012 8:44:03 AM

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Has anyone else ever dealt with the mood swings? One minute I am mad as hell and the next I just want to cry. In one of the above posts it said 24 or 36 hours cessation anger and irritability peaks. I haven't had a cigarette for 18 hours now and its driving me nuts! Trying to make that 24 hour mark and make it thru by setting little goals at a time.

FelineFantasy
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2012 3:26:01 PM

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The thing is you have to stop taking everyone's advice and evaluate yourself. Are you quitting for reasons other than you sincerely wanting to? If so, then it has to come to the point where you value your health more than anything else. You can listen to what everyone else has to say, but you have to really want it and be ready to do so in order for it to work. Otherwise, it will just be a vicious cycle. Do it right the first time!

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Guest
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2012 4:28:37 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
I quit every day. LOL. Seriously, I have quit several times for various amounts of time. I have been to smoking cessation treatments six times while in the military. I have had the patch, gum, nicorette, and finally Chantix.

Had good results with the gum, but the best was with Chantix, though the moodswings were annoying. It was weird....I could smoke as much as I want, but just didn't get anything from it.

I really hate smoking anymore ;and am going to quit. The main reason is that the SEX will be so much better!!! Honestly, when I was younger I could go hard and fast indefinitely but am beginning to feel my age and that is very annoying sometimes. I absolutely hate it when I can't give my wife what she wants or NEEDS :D
latinfoxy
Posted: Saturday, December 01, 2012 11:58:51 AM

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Im trying to quit, my last one was 2 weeks and 3 days ago, and i feel like smocking 4 cigarettes at the same time to celebrate! angry7

This has been really difficult and the cravings still come hard, but i feel like im in AA taking one day at a time, and hopping that it will get easier soon! Im also on a diet and work is as hectic as it can ever be, so yeah i think i might end up going insane in a bout a week d'oh!

Mood swings (Check)
Cravings (Check)
Anxiety (Check)

Fun fun times! cussing
Guest
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2012 6:36:58 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
Here's my take on it. From personal experience. It may differ for others. But hope this helps.

I had my last fag on June 3rd 2007. Before that I smoked 20+ moko's a day. I gave up in what is in my opinion the best way - it may differ for others - cold turkey! Just endure the initial 6 or 7 days of torture. then further few weeks of mild torture, then a few months of just bearable cravings. If you give up cold turkey (no cutting down, no patches, no nicotine period) then the nicotine is out of your system in just 3 days, (although you will still be pulling your hair out for the first week or so), after about a week the next few weeks you will still be craving but, your chances of remaining 'Quit' are much much greater and you will be likely to stick it out, also smoking will no longer be the dominant force of your thoughts and feelings. After between 4 and 6 weeks, the cravings would have subsided significantly and you will only crave at certain times. i.e. when you have your morning coffee, after a nice meal, when you are streessed. For a few months or so. It's all worth it. It may seem difficult, but willpower is detrmined by your perspective.
If you say for example. "Who is in control? Me or the cigarettes? Am I a slave to an addiction or am I the one in conrol of my actions." and "This is a battle and I am going to kick smokings ass, if I continue smoking then smoking has beaten me and I am weaker than my addiction etc......" This kind of thinking should give your 'willpower' a great motivational boost. Also write down a list of the benefits of not smoking. such as:
"I wil save X amount of money"
"My health condition will improve greatly, along with my dental hygene"
"I will no longer stink of cigarettes"
"I will no loger be enslaved to this addiction"
"My self esteem will be boosted greatly as I will feel so pleased with myself that I have the strength to fight and win this addiction"
(Add whatever else you think benefits you not smoking.)

Be honest with yourself and say: "I smoke because I am an addict to smoking. If I enjoy smokng, it's beause I am enjoying the feeding of an addiction, smoking has control over me," etc..... This again will give you great motivation to quit. Your willpower is determined by your state of mind. you CAN do it. easily!

Remember if you can last those initial 6 or 7 days you will have achieved what most quitters have been unable to, and will be much more likely to quit for good. Congratulate yourself for lasting this long.

Good Luck x

Green_Man
Posted: Monday, December 03, 2012 11:05:21 AM

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Quick response. You must have a reason for quitting. YOUR reason. Without it you are wasting your time. Then when you have established a valid and compelling reason, do this. Take a two week vacation. Stay at home. Do not, under any circumstances leave your place. You, of course, have rid yourself of all smoking shit. Then, you just eat and sleep for two weeks. One or the other, for two weeks. You may have visitors, of course, but they must be such good friends they will not feed your habit, no matter how much you beg. I can only say, it worked for me. Smoke free since 1999.

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LadySharon
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 5:00:19 PM

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My ex-roommate took away my hookah, chewing tobacco, and my packs of Camels and threw them out in front of me. He said to me, "Sharon, I don't want you to have a heart attack on my watch." To curb the cravings, I started jogging and doing cardio a lot. I chewed pen caps like they were gum. It's been four years and I haven't had a craving yet.

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latinfoxy
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2013 6:01:07 PM

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Today its three months since my last one!!!! Pour Wine
Guest
Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2013 1:50:35 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
latinfoxy wrote:
Today its three months since my last one!!!! Pour Wine
Gratz!!! 3601
Guest
Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2013 2:00:13 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
I went from smoking 3 packs a day to NOTHING. So I am not sure any advice I could give would be helpful to anyone. There has already been a lot of great advice given. I simply used will power, no tricks. I have been smoke free for almost 15 years now and don't regret it a moment.
cheeseball
Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2013 5:10:41 AM

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Location: Chicago, United States
The city of Chicago just increased the tax on a pack of cigarettes by $1.00 starting March 1st. The price of a pack is now over $7.00 in most places. Two pack a day habit would be $420 a month. That monthly amount would certainly buy you one nice automobile. That would motivate me to quit.
Wandering2
Posted: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 11:43:59 PM

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To all the folks who have or are trying to quit. GOOD for you! Be gentle on yourself if you are still in the quitting cycle. It's one of the hardest things I ever chose to do.

Smoked my first cigarette in 6th grade. Smoked my last one a couple of years ago next month. It took me several years of all the games we can play with ourselves to quit. I missed cigarettes when I wasn't smoking. They were my friends, my crutch, my lifeline, my sanity.

Finally tried "Emotional Freedom Technique" or "tapping". OMG. It worked!! It works. Doesn't cost a penny, no nasty tasting gum, no bad side effects, no strange mind altering chemicals. EFT Google it. Dr. Mercola has some great info about it. mercola.com YouTube has lots of videos on it. It works for many many things. I didn't know if I was ever going to be able to quit smoking even though one of my dearest friends and my mother both died of lung cancer. So glad EFT came my way. It saved my life. Life is precious. And so much fun with all my LUSH friends.

Good luck. Live Long Be Healthy.

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Guest
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2013 3:42:21 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
I would liken it to, or include Hypnotherapy to EFT. I tried it once to give up smoking. Had my last cigarette just before I walked in. The therapist took me through a few things, like ALL the reasons I wanted to give up smoking, tips for fighting cravings. She told me 90% of smoking was habit although I didn't believe her at the time. I changed the way I did most things, used my laptop in a different area of the room, had my coffee in a different place. She told me to munch on grapes if I got a craving.. it worked! keep a little jar of nuts in the car, reach for one of those instead of a cigarette. For the first week I slept most of the time... after that I made a point of having grapes in the fridge at all times. I had very little cravings and actually lost weight. I haven't had a cigarette for about 18 months. I did walk in there believing it might help me though, and you have to really want to give cigarettes up. It might not work for everybody but it worked for me.

Other people have told me that eating an orange or half an orange when you have cravings will help. Don't eat an apple, funnily enough eating an applie would make me want a ciggy more.
VanGogh
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2013 7:45:20 AM

Rank: Sarcastic Coffee Aficionado

Joined: 2/10/2012
Posts: 3,039
Location: Vancouver, Canada
quit smoking was the hardest thing I've ever done.

honestly.

For me it was just sheer will-power. I had quit before a few times doing the gradual thing. Then, the last time it was cold turkey. The best deterrent was my boyfriend at the time who was a non-smoker. I kept busy doing sports - anything outdoors, really. Back then, you could smoke ANYWHERE .... including smoking rooms in hospitals (for the love of god - imagine that!!) Even my doctor smoked in his office!!

Anyways ... the activities outside lead to more oxygen and feeling better. And, when I was indoors, I took up other hobbies .... cooking in particular. OMG - Food tastes SO much better!!

Quitting smoking is one thing you won't regret doing!

PA



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Guest
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2013 8:41:55 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
Mhmm I have tried and will try again I imagine. It is hard for me! I work bars and most of my friends also have the habit. Plus there are times when omg. Like after great sex or a drink :)
LOVES4PLAY
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2013 12:22:14 PM

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Joined: 10/14/2010
Posts: 944
Location: JUST A CLICK AWAY, United States
LOVED YOUR SUCCESS STORIES;I had quit several times, only top start again..the last time I quit smoking was in 1968,My life was filled with all kinds of stress. My Dad was in a VA. Hosp not knowing if he would live or die, My roommate was pressuring me about marriage, At work a foreman was cutting my downtime (money taken away from me)and a couple other things I had no control over.." God let my dad live & I'll stop smoking" He did & I stopped.8 days later I was given some mild sedatives (Along with the medical advise that I was a Damn fool to quit at this time) By the 11th day all cravings had vanished...!969 DWI. head on collision while drag racing ( 3 cars destroyed, NO one was hurt except for some bruising.)..Quit drinking..68-nonsmoker, 69 non drinker..Bottom line unless you really want to quit no one can force you to.. I was supported by my GF, & friends . they didn't light up around me, smoked outside, none smoked in my car.. No advice offered, Just a success story shared

To those of you now struggling I wish you the very best, There is some good advice offered to you in these posts IT IS VERY HARD BUT YOU CAN DO IT Joel
TXhoney
Posted: Thursday, March 21, 2013 9:11:56 PM

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Joined: 8/26/2011
Posts: 138
Location: United States
I'm happy to be able to say that I finally did kick the habit and it has been 5 months since I quit. A few weeks after I had quit I was over at my brother's house and we all had been drinking and they are smokers and I had the urge to smoke again. It tasted so bad to me that I could not even finish the cigarette. As others have said quitting has been one of the best things that I have ever done for myself. icon_smile

cheeseball
Posted: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:26:47 AM

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Joined: 1/19/2013
Posts: 167
Location: Chicago, United States
Thankfully I never picked up the habit myself. My daughter did smoke for quite a few years and then stopped when she became pregnant. She said it was one of the hardest things she has ever done. I am proud of her for quitting. And a tip of the hat to all of you that have quit or are trying to quit. Don't give up, you can do it. Good Luck!
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, April 19, 2013 10:20:55 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,289
Location: Cakeland, United States
http://www.whyquit.com/

Why is this addiction so hard to quit - once you've been using the purposely engineered delivery systems created by Big Tobacco?

Nicotine is the tobacco plant's natural protection from being eaten by insects.
Its widespread use as a farm crop insecticide is now being blamed for killing honey bees. A super toxin, drop for drop it is more lethal than strychnine or diamondback rattlesnake venom and three times deadlier than arsenic.
Yet amazingly, by chance, this natural insecticide's chemical signature is so similar to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that once inside the brain it fits a host of chemical locks permitting it direct and indirect control over the flow of more than 200 neuro-chemicals, most importantly dopamine.

What Are Dopamine Pathways?

What is dopamine? It's hard to understand nicotine addiction, or any form of drug addiction for that matter, without a basic understanding of the brain's primary motivation neurotransmitter, dopamine. The brain's dopamine pathways serve as a built-in teacher. It uses a desire, yearning or wanting sensation to get our attention when it wants to pound home a survival lesson necessary to keep us humans alive and thriving.

Have you ever wondered why it's so hard to go without eating, to actually starve yourself to death, or for that matter, to die of thirst? Why do we seek acceptance by our peers, want companionship, and desire a mate or sexual relations? Why do we feel anxiety when bored and an "aaah" sense of relief when we complete a task?

Remember the very first time your parents praised you for keeping your coloring between the lines? Remember the "aaah" sensation? That was dopamine, the satisfaction of your wanting to succeed. The deep inner primitive brain (the limbic mind) is hard-wired, via dopamine pathways, to keep us drinking liquids, fed, together (there's "safety in numbers"), while achieving and reproducing.



When we feel hunger our dopamine pathways are being stimulated, teasing us with anticipation "wanting" for food. If kept waiting, the anticipation may build into urges or even full-blown craves. Each bite we eat further stimulates dopamine flow until stomach peptides at last tell the brain we're full and wanting becomes satisfied.

But our brain doesn't stop with simply creating and satisfying wanting associated with species survival events such as eating, drinking liquids, bonding, nurturing, accomplishment and sex. It makes sure that we don't forget them, that in the future we pay close attention to these activities.

The brain records how wanting was satisfied in the most durable, high-definition memory the mind may be capable of generating. It does so by hard-wiring dopamine pathway neuro-transmissions into our conscious memory banks (the prefrontal cortex - the lobe above our eyes), where each is linked to the event that satisfied dopamine pathway wanting, hunger and yearning.

Drug Addiction's Common Thread

Now ponder this. What would happen if, by chance, an external chemical existed that once introduced into the bloodstream was small enough to pass through the blood/brain barrier (a protective filter), and once inside the brain were somehow able to activate and turn on our mind's dopamine pathway circuitry? Could that chemical hijack the mind's priorities teacher? If so, how long would it take before continuing chemical use resulted in the person becoming totally yet falsely convinced that using more of the chemical was as important as eating food?





Some of us are bio-chemically prone to addictions (for instance, myself). I have been addicted to all manner of intoxicants all my life. The cigarettes have been the most physically destructive and the hardest to simply quit (with zero help or knowledge). 30 plus years of on & off (mostly on) the drug - make me wonder if I've destroyed the factories inside my body which create the natural dopamine.

I was using then rapidly abusing very potent, high grade quality cocaine for 30 months in the early to mid 1990s. It's been almost twenty years since I first started in with that import euphoria, and in October it will be 17 years since I managed to fully walk away from it. My brain recovered. I can only hope for similar results with my most recent attempt to ditch Big Tobacco.


If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, April 19, 2013 1:19:03 PM

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If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
BelleduJour
Posted: Friday, April 19, 2013 1:46:58 PM

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Joined: 11/13/2011
Posts: 1,509
Location: Canada
Congratulations on choosing to quit smoking! I too am a former smoker. Started in freshman year of high school until I was in my mid twenties. LOVED smoking!! The only reason I quit was because my now ex-hubby told me he couldn't and wouldn't date a smoker so I chose HIM over my cigarettes. Unfortunately I don't have any stellar advice for you as I quit cold turkey. It was hard as hell and I slipped up a few times but gradually and eventually I began to love the feeling of breathing without wheezing or coughing up a lung not to mention kissing a clean mouth rather than one that tasted like an ashtray was a definite bonus. Its been over 20 years since I've smoked and I've never regretted it. I now work for a cancer charity so smoking, even if I wanted to again, would cost me my job, lol. Good luck!

Guest
Posted: Monday, May 13, 2013 3:21:15 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 535,127
I've been smoke free now for two and a half years, I found the nicotine craves getting a lot easier to manage after the first 3 or 4 weeks. I didn't use nicotine patches but I did use a lot of chewing gum. I also did a simple exercise when I had a craving; star jumps etc..

Best of luck!
Poppet
Posted: Monday, May 13, 2013 4:04:07 PM

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I never been the type to smoke on Sunday’s and went about my day, next thing I knew it was two weeks later and realized I hadn’t smoked in that whole time. I told myself, I might as well quit since I went two weeks without it. I never looked back; it’s been ten years since. I am so proud to say I never picked it back up. I have however become more of a potty mouth. Weird right? Kick one bad habit to start another. I rather curse than smoke though! At least swearing is free! Lol

ManInNewHampshire
Posted: Monday, May 13, 2013 5:02:16 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/23/2013
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We all (smokers / ex-smokers) need strong reasons to even start the process.
I decided I also needed a change of routine for at least the initial 1 to 2 weeks. I was taking a vacation to Vega for Christmas and New Years celebrations. Decided I would try during that trip. Worked wonders. Was easier to continue with out smoking after coming back to my regular routine 2 weeks later.
Cigarette smoking is physically addictive. But it also becomes a part of our every day routine. So many trigger moments during the day every day.
Good luck to all trying to give up.
applegenie
Posted: Monday, May 13, 2013 9:29:45 PM

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I stopped smoking 3 years ago using a product called smoke away. they were these vile pills I had to choke down. They helped with the cravings but what helped me the most, I looked at what I was spending. At a carton a week at 50 bucks over 52 weeks, I had spent enough for a nice vacation or a big TV. To say the least, that disgusted me the most and made the quitting stick.
latinfoxy
Posted: Monday, May 13, 2013 9:31:09 PM

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Joined: 4/5/2011
Posts: 816
Location: Here
In 2 days it will be 6 months since my last one! Its definitely one of the hardest thing i have done in a long time! You never realise how much it is a part of your life till you quit. A friend that also quit it a while ago says its like the death of a good friend. At first i thought she was been overdramatic but it is a big part of your life, when you are sad, bored, drunk, happy, tired, stressed... its always right there by you!

What i have found its the best way to compensate, its finding something different to do in those moments, like if you are stressed chew on a straw or if you are bored play with your phone. That way you get distracted by something else.

Good luck to all of you trying!!
crazydiamond
Posted: Thursday, July 04, 2013 2:13:57 PM

Rank: Clever Gem

Joined: 7/17/2011
Posts: 2,286
Location: Exactly where I should be!, Canada
I'm just hitting day 7 of COLD TURKEY.

I quit randomly without planning it at the stupidest time ever. My last week of a degree, an exhibition , and a required course for next year all at the same time.

I have been pushed beyond what I thought I could manage this week. I've smoked 20 years.

I've managed so far, i keep waking up at 4 am though.
I can handle most cravings they last about 3 minutes.
Sips of water help and distraction.

The quicker you curb the nicotine intake, the faster you can sort the habit. That's why i went cold turkey ,I did not want to depend on nicotine in a repalcement form to drag it out.

I dread meals at the moment, as they make me want fags, so i'm not replacing with food, i'm avoiding it till i'm starved.
I really notice how much extra time i have now by not smoking? So weird.

The worst bit is the "sneak up on you craving", it occurs when you do something where you would nornmlly smoke.
It feels like a hunger for food or breath, in your chest, its powerful, but recognise it for what it is, a craving for a drug you gave up, you are missing out on nothing, it just wants you to think you are, to satisfy its needs, not YOURS!

It's not a loss, i'm not pitying myself, this is all good, recognise it like that and it helps, i'm only gaining benefits right?

I also look at it practically , i've made it 7 days.
Day one was the worst.
If i take any nicotine now, the reactions go back to those of day one.
That would be what you call insanity, that pushes me, the longer i go the easier it gets, if i slip up , it starts all over.

Simple choice really. Its hard as fuck, but so is my will.

Just be stubborn bunny

Magical_felix
Posted: Thursday, July 04, 2013 2:15:47 PM

Rank: Wild at Heart

Joined: 4/3/2010
Posts: 4,909
Location: California
The best way to quit smoking is to date a really really hot girl that fucking hates smokers. You'll quit in like a day.



crazydiamond
Posted: Thursday, July 04, 2013 2:18:43 PM

Rank: Clever Gem

Joined: 7/17/2011
Posts: 2,286
Location: Exactly where I should be!, Canada
Magical_felix wrote:
The best way to quit smoking is to date a really really hot girl that fucking hates smokers. You'll quit in like a day.


yeah, exept i don't dig girls bunny

Screams in nicotine desperation "OHHHHH BOYS!!"


Side note, all of a sudden i've noticed too my tolerance for coffee is gone weird, it makes me jittery and weird. I never had an issue before, i googled it , it too is a nicotine withdrawal thing. nicotine surpressees the caffeine reaction. Now it's not, blech it's horrid.

WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, July 05, 2013 8:41:34 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,289
Location: Cakeland, United States
crazydiamond wrote:


Side note, all of a sudden i've noticed too my tolerance for coffee is gone weird, it makes me jittery and weird. I never had an issue before, i googled it , it too is a nicotine withdrawal thing. nicotine surpressees the caffeine reaction. Now it's not, blech it's horrid.


I quit smoking combusted cigs on April 1st - no fooling. Within a week, coffee tasted like blechhh to me also. However, I changed combusted weaponized cigarettes for liquid boiled electronic nicotine inhalation (with flavors like butterscotch, chocolate hazelnut, cran/rasberry & strawberry milkshake).

Have stepped down from 28 milligrams of nicotine per 'vape' in April, to 18 mg starting this month. It's said that 18 milligrams is about what you would get per puff off of a 'light' cigarette.

And I find I can also go longer in between vapor inhalations... Instead of a weaponized Winston Light cigarette every 60-90 minutes, I take 6 to 10 inhalations every 3 or 4 hours...

Costs? I'm missing out on the 4000 other toxic chemicals within each inhalation of the 'normal' cigarette of today. @ $50 a carton of the old fashioned analog cigarettes and a carton a week...that's $600 not spent on killing myself slowly, this year.

I've spent about $400 on the e-cigarette batteries, accessories and liquid nicotine (niquid). I have enough niquid on hand to last me til November - If I haven't whittled myself down to 3mg doses of this stuff by then and just quit altogether - as is the plan. (then I can give these three e-cigs to a brother or a friend and encourage them to use 'em to quit). They'll have to buy their own niquid, and vaping tanks/tips - which is really inexpensive.

Getting my stamina back slowly. Food tastes and smells much better.

And I don't stench like a walking ashtray... some people seem to be more friendly the last few months - 6

No offense to those ladies who still smoke...but the non-smoking women are quite a bit more attractive (in their 30's, 40's & 50's) I've noticed.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
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