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latinfoxy
Posted: Thursday, May 23, 2013 8:41:19 PM

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So im thinking of buying a dog, i love animals but i have never have had a dog, so im kind of scare of what im getting myself into.

I know a lot of you guys have dogs so i would love to hear all the tips and tricks you guys can give me. Im also reading and watching a lot of stuff, but i hear its like a baby you can never be really prepared.

Im thinking of buying a black mini schnauzer.
trinket
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 5:13:52 AM

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If you're buying a young puppy and he's very small, put a little bell on his collar so you know where he is. It will stop you from standing on him lol. They follow you EVERYWHERE. When I first got mine I had to do that, and he also chewed everything. I bought a new pair of EXPENSIVE shoes one day, left them near the front door. Next morning there was only half a pair left. I had to make sure all electrical cords were out of his reach or he headed straight for them. He Chewed EVERYTHING. Also, a friend of mine had their 4 month old puppy die after he munched on one of their plants in the garden, I think it was a cyad or something like that, so that's worth looking into as well.

When you are house training him, after you have fed him and other times throughout the day, take him out to a spot in the yard you would prefer him to use. Take him to the same area every time. This will become his 'spot', otherwise he is going to start doing it ALL over your yard. He should have his own spot for food and water, try to keep his mealtimes the same every day and in the same spot, and have his bed in the same spot all the time.

If you get a dog that will need regular grooming, brush him from the very first day you bring him home, and be firm with him. Usually they think it's a game, but if you don't get him used to grooming when he's very young, you will have trouble with it later. You can train and teach a new puppy from as young as 10 weeks old. I taught mine to sit at 10 weeks. Use the reward system where you give him a little treat when he does the right thing for you. Puppy Pre-school is a great idea when he is a little older.

Do a few searches online, you'll find out all the info you need, and don't forget to take him to get a vet check when you first bring him home, even if the breeder shows you a report saying it has already been done. Good luck.

Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 6:32:20 AM

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Joined: 2/17/2010
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Location: In your dirty fantasies
Dogs are amazing creatures - the best kind of pet you can have (sorry, cat people) but admittedly they also take more work. Although if you're getting a mini breed, probably not as much. Training is not that hard. The biggest thing is understanding the commitment to walks and doing the potty breaks - even when you're not feeling like it. Like when you're sick, first thing in the morning, when the weather is awful, when you get home at 3am from a night out - you have to take the dog out and make sure he's taken care of. As long as you're able to commit to that, you're golden. They're so much fun. The puppy stage can be a bit of mayhem at first but it all evens out. Nobody will ever be as unconditionally happy to see you as your dog and they are endlessly entertaining and fun.

My #1 bit of advice - research your breed and make sure it fits your lifestyle and know the potential health issues inherent in each breed. If you're getting a purebred, go to a reputable breeder. Don't go for the cheaper option when it comes to breeders - a bit of money saved upfront can sometimes turn out to be a lot of money spent in vet bills over the longrun. You want to get a healthy pup. Also let the breeder know what kind of 'temperament' you want (eg. outgoing and energetic vs quieter/lower-energy) - good breeders will match you up with the right pup.

The puppy stage does require a bit of a time investment, so if you're uncertain about that but are really sold on a particular breed, try looking for 'rescue groups' for that breed or check in with breeders to see if they have an adult dog available (most will at one point or another).

If you have any specific Qs, let me know. :)


She
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 7:09:20 AM

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I am a dog person as well, if this is your first one, you have to understand (and Lush mothers, please dont hate me for saying this) that dog is like a baby. Meaning, you have many duties and renssponsebilites, specially in first year of any breed or size. You will most probablly want to socialize your dog, so you will have to teach him how you want it to react in certain situations. You will have to repeat over and over the same tasks, so your dog will get it. It is really a lot of work with it, and if you dont have time for it, than your dog will be wild, unsocialized and unhappy. It is major commitment.

My family has newer breed Russian Terrier, smart as hell! I know that we buy things with our eyes, but read about different carracters and than decide, which one suits you, and your lifesyle most.
My 2 cents

Good luck with it! Dogs are such a lovely creatures :)





RumpleForeskin
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 7:31:05 AM

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Just wanted to put in a good word for your local animal shelter(s) and 'Rescued Dog' organizations. The latter are usually dedicated to a specific greed, such as greyhounds, or a type, such as small dogs. Check online for what's available in your area.

All the advice you've gotten is first-rate.

glasses8

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Liz
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 7:54:35 AM

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Dogs are awesome :)
They have their own personalities and quirks which make every single one an individual.
We have had a couple of dogs in the past. One was particularly cheeky, the other somewhat grumpy, but both were absolutely adorable in their own way!

Meet Alfie (8 months old).

He will make a point of sleeping in the most awkward places possible:



He will eat anything he can get his paws on:



But he's still super loveable Hugs
Heed the above advice from Trinket and DD, puppies are a handful.
It will still be the best thing you ever do. A friend for life icon_smile

dog


latinfoxy
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 8:15:07 AM

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Location: Here
Thank you all so much for your answers!!!

The Black mini schnauzer its not really a very small dog its more like a medium size. They are incredibly smart and super fun, but at the same time they can be mellow and calm. Which its perfect because i have the idea of taking her to the office with me. But that also makes me more aware of the fact that i need to train her to behave quickly.

The fact is im a workaholic so i spend most of my day at work, so i either bring her with me or i prefer not to buy a dog at all.

So have any of you train your dog not to bark a lot? Have any tried the crate train system? (not the one of the small crate, but the one of an specific space where she spends a long time, till she learns to play with only her toys and potty train.)
Nikki703
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 8:16:18 AM

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A lot of great advice!!

I love dogs (cats too) and Im more in favor of adopting a shelter dog. I prefer a young adult dog, you will already know the temperament and be passed the crazy puppy stage. Although the puppy stage can be so much fun too, lot of work but FUN! But if you have your heart set on a specific breed (although you can find pure breed adult dogs to adopt), do your research when choosing a breeder. Like everything else, there are a good breeders and bad breeders. Stick with a breeder that specializes in a specific breed, ask for references. And avoid puppy mills. Generally dogs that come from puppy mills are not as healthy and they usually wont disclose any potential ailments.

If you do go the puppy route, be sure to "puppy proof" your home, much like you would do for children, child locks on cabinets, blocking any open electrical outlets, hiding electrical cords, etc. They can get into everything. And putting it through Puppy School is a good idea too.

Having a dog is a big commitment so make sure the breed fits your lifestyle. If you are a couch potato, you don't want an active dog lie a Border Collie. If you live in a small apartment, you probably don't want a Great Dane, LOL! And if you have small children, that is also something to keep in mind. Some dogs are great with kids and others can be territorial and be very jealous of kids. Please, DO YOUR RESEARCH!!

Having a dog is wonderful. Never will you be loved so unconditionally!! But it is a 2-way street. If you make the commitment, please remember that pets aren't disposable, something you just dump when the novelty wears off!!
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 8:42:55 AM

Rank: Alpha Blonde

Joined: 2/17/2010
Posts: 5,979
Location: In your dirty fantasies
latinfoxy wrote:
Thank you all so much for your answers!!!

The Black mini schnauzer its not really a very small dog its more like a medium size. They are incredibly smart and super fun, but at the same time they can be mellow and calm. Which its perfect because i have the idea of taking her to the office with me. But that also makes me more aware of the fact that i need to train her to behave quickly.

The fact is im a workaholic so i spend most of my day at work, so i either bring her with me or i prefer not to buy a dog at all.

So have any of you train your dog not to bark a lot? Have any tried the crate train system? (not the one of the small crate, but the one of an specific space where she spends a long time, till she learns to play with only her toys and potty train.)


Re barking - some breeds are 'barkier' than others. It's definitely a factor to consider if she's going to be at work with you. Terriers can be barky and somewhat stubborn (I had one growing up), so keep that in mind. Not to say that your dog, in particular, will be that way - but it's a tendency of the breed. They definitely are different and have different personalities but every dog breed was designed to do something specific, so that can tell you a bit about their likely tendencies.

Top 10 Dog Breeds That Don’t Bark Much
Basenji
Most Retrievers (Golden, Chesapeake Bay, Labrador)
Shiba Inu
Japanese Chin
Basset Hound
Clumber Spaniel
Bloodhound
Borzoi
Italian Greyhoundx
Bulldog

Top 10 Dog Breeds That Bark A Lot
Chihuahua
Pekinese
Most Terriers (except the Bull Terrier which falls into the non-barking list above)
Most Poodles (Toy, Miniature, and Standard Poodles)
Collie
Doberman Pinscher
German Shepherd
Lhasa Apso
Pomeranian

Re the crate. Yeah, I've done the crate training in the very beginning. It's definitely recommended (especially if it's your first dog) and will also give you peace of mind for breaks when you can't look after her or need to get some down-time. Exercise is huge though - especially when the dog is young - if you 'drain the energy', the dog will be much more calm and relaxed and happy to gnaw on a bone and nap. If they don't get enough exercise, they're more likely to act like hellions and bark and destroy stuff.

As others have said - having a puppy is definitely a time commitment and you will have your share of frustrations - that part is normal. You've gotta put in the 'work' to get a good dog out of it. But there are tons of rescue groups and shelters that will also have adult dogs who have a known personality already so that might be an option. At least you know what you're getting as far as energy level and habits go.



Marshall_Lewis
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 8:55:38 AM

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Joined: 8/16/2012
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Location: Alum Creek, United States
Dog's are the best animal you can ever have the privlage to take care of. I have had a few different dog breeds. Lab's, Yorkie, Shitzu, Jack Russell Terrior, Pit Bull, American Bulldog, Puggule, Husky, and German Shepard. The most loving, loyal, and best listening dog's I have had, are a tie between my pit bull, Alice, and my lovable cuddle buddy husky, Snow(she is now 15 years old and acting like a puppy still ^-^)

I believe that the best companion dogs are larger breeds(even though some think they are lap dogs) but all dogs are great. As for getting a new puppy, it's best to bring it in to your work at a younger age to get fimilar with your piers. Also to get used to having two different spots to use the potty, one at home, one at work!

Best of luck!! And please please please, don't put a choke collar on the dog, I work at a shelter as a officer(similar to the ASPCA) and I see what they dog to dogs.

Mazza
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 9:54:43 AM

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Joined: 9/20/2012
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Location: Scotland, United Kingdom
Everyone has given you excellent advice here...

Another thing worth thinking about is making sure that you have health insurance for your dog. Vet bills can be extortionate (I found that out the hard way)

Also, it's worth doing a little research into the health issues that may affect the breed of dog you buy... Schnauzers are prone to cataracts and have to be tested...

If you've not had a dog before, puppy training classes will be good for you and your dog and will also help you to socialise them with other dogs as well...

Good luck with it all!

latinfoxy
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 10:20:08 AM

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Again thank you for all your input!

Now im re reading all the breeds they are and rethinking which one can actually be good for my particular situation. Maybe a basset hound that are more lay back and calm could fit better for me to bring to work, but then the bigger the dog the bigger the mess... I dont think i am the have a purse pet kind of person and the only small breed that i like is Yorkshire, but they are probably way more easy to take care of and handle.

Ok i think i have a lot to think about!!

EDIT: Ok erase Yorkshire from the list, just read about them and they are noisy and are prone to a lot of health issues!
sprite
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 10:21:51 AM

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one word. Cat. thank you. my work here is done. Regaeman Man

trinket
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 10:41:02 AM

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sprite
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 10:42:57 AM

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trinket wrote:


Sprite: One word. Unicorn. thank you.


you know, you mention it once, and they never let you forget it.


Nikki703
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 10:55:02 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/7/2009
Posts: 12,329
Location: The Other Side Of The Mirror
latinfoxy wrote:
Again thank you for all your input!

Now im re reading all the breeds they are and rethinking which one can actually be good for my particular situation. Maybe a basset hound that are more lay back and calm could fit better for me to bring to work, but then the bigger the dog the bigger the mess... I dont think i am the have a purse pet kind of person and the only small breed that i like is Yorkshire, but they are probably way more easy to take care of and handle.

Ok i think i have a lot to think about!!

EDIT: Ok erase Yorkshire from the list, just read about them and they are noisy and are prone to a lot of health issues!



I don't know how much of rush you are to find a dog but a good way to get to know the breeds and learn about them is to attend a local dog show if there is one in your area. By speaking with handlers and breeders you can learn so much about the breed. And I have found that most of them are willing to speak with you (as long as it isn't close to their show time).

I have a friend that was interested in getting an English Mastiff. After speaking with a few people at the show he learned it wasn't the dog for him. He wanted a big dog but an active dog. One of the owners told him that Mastiffs are great family dogs but when out walking, you can only walk as far as you are willing to carry the dog home from. When they are tired of walking, they lay down and go to sleep. And being that they can weigh up to 250lbs, not a good idea for an active person who wants a dog to take hiking, LOL!! He settled on an Bernese Mountain Dog!

The more you know about the breed, the better choice you will make and the happier you and your pup will be!!
sprite
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 11:02:28 AM

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ok, not sure what sized dog you're looking for, but although i'm not a dog owner, i know several who are and from my experience Labs and Retrievers are very mellow dogs - a bit larger, but i've yet to meet one that hasn't been friendly and sweet and comfortable for people who are a little wary of dogs to be around. :)
LOVES4PLAY
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 1:06:53 PM

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wish i could type fast.i am a dog lover. but it is directed only to large dogs. there are probably more Black Labs , Listed in AKC than any other breed,small dogs appear to bark a lot more than their larger kin.Terriers know no fear(so be careful around other dogs, ) as a whole they are very intelligent. they do have a tendency to bite, think they demand a lot of exercise.

should you visit a shelter, for a Dog. Be careful . They want to find homes for the dogs . that is where they get monies to continue working. So they may not be up front nor totally honest with you..Re;I was given an older German Shepard, to replace my Hybrid.(Alaska Malamute, German Shepard & Wolf)The dog had been abused, He tried digging out. sometimes his escape rout was 3' deep, He tore the up-rite boards off of the fence. .. his escapes were eliminated, by work & additional materials, Having paid out fines of a little over 400.00 dollars I was tempted to leave him in the shelter. The shelter knew of the problems i was fighting, Yet they made no mention of his escapes or that he killed cats..If you choose a shelter please don't get a dog unless you can talk to the party that surrendered the dog to that shelter..
Above all read up on different breeds.I promise you that if you get a good dog you will probably never regret it.
Dudealicious
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 1:27:06 PM

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I have French Bulldogs and must say they are an amazing breed! The are very quiet (thats Bulldog in them) and require a decent amount of activity. My two boys actually will sit at the front door and give you the stink eye until you take them for their daily walk. They are however, VERY stubborn they do take a little patience but you will be well rewarded. Couldn't imagine life without them!



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Guest
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 5:19:06 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 473,477
Awwww so bloody cute they are the little frenchies.

Beside our working cattle dogs I have this beautiful French mastiff. She is so protective of me and will stand across the front of me whenever there a male near or talking to me, including hubby.
My best advice is to buy off a reputable breeder and do ur homework. Especially about the nature of the over riding energy levels the dog has.
That a need that has to be met or u will have a destructive puppy.
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 5:27:50 PM

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Awww - I was going to suggest Frenchies actually. They're great little dogs.

This designer hybrid - the Puggle (cross Pug x Beagle) seems to be getting more and more popular lately - I've heard good things from those that own them.








Like Liz, I'm a die hard retriever girl myself, but there's a lot of great breeds of all sizes.


sprite
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 6:53:38 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:
Awww - I was going to suggest Frenchies actually. They're great little dogs.

This designer hybrid - the Puggle (cross Pug x Beagle) seems to be getting more and more popular lately - I've heard good things from those that own them.





omg, the cuteness factor on her made me squeal out loud!
latinfoxy
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 7:53:17 PM

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Im going tomorrow to a dog show where they also sell dogs, im going to see and learn more about the different breeds that could work for me. If i bring one home ill let you all know :)

I love labradors also, i have always wanted a chocolate one, but i think that my lifestyle right now doesnt fit with a big dog. I think it wouldnt be fair for the dog or for me. So i guess ill have to wait to get that labrador at some other point in my life. Maybe bigger house or more free time, for right now i have to look for a smaller dog.

Wish me luck tomorrow!!
latinfoxy
Posted: Sunday, May 26, 2013 4:33:32 PM

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Ok so yesterday i got her! it was one of those things that she picked me and not the other way around <3 She is amazingly cute, calm and peeing and pooing everywhere hahahahha (not everything could be perfect) but so far I'm been good with the whole trying to train her thing!

Tomorrow will be her first day at work, so wish us luck! lol







(no thats not me, thats a friend holding her while i was driving)
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Sunday, May 26, 2013 7:04:40 PM

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Awwwwww.... you got her!!!!

Congrats on the new furbaby! She's adorable!

Let me know if you have Qs and make sure to post updates. You're going to have so much fun with her! Trust me - you'll have a few crazy puppy days too, but rest assured it does get easier. :)

PS. They pee and poo quite a lot as puppies - make sure to take her out *as soon* as she wakes up from naps. Literally. They will pee right away after rests. Also right after eating. As they start growing they'll be able to hold their bladders longer.

Good luck tomorrow!


trinket
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2013 3:55:07 AM

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She
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2013 4:46:59 AM

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Location: Europe
latinfoxy wrote:
Ok so yesterday i got her! it was one of those things that she picked me and not the other way around <3 She is amazingly cute, calm and peeing and pooing everywhere hahahahha (not everything could be perfect) but so far I'm been good with the whole trying to train her thing!

Tomorrow will be her first day at work, so wish us luck! lol


Congratulations! She is adorable hello1

I was wondering, if you managed to teach her to pee and poo at least on one spot. She is too litle to hold, her blatter is too small.
What might help you, specially in the office, is to teach her to pee on newspaper, New York Times type. You can put some plastic foil under paper in the office, that way cleaning should be easier.
You will need just few times with her to teach her that trick. After her meal, when she usually does poo, get her attention and scratch newspaper with your finger nails, try to get her on the paper. Maybe in the very begining you will have to move her right in the midle of it on the paper and leave few minutes that poo there, so she can memorise it.

Good luck with her, she will bring you som much of ajoy icon_biggrin
LOVES4PLAY
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2013 7:36:45 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/14/2010
Posts: 944
Location: JUST A CLICK AWAY, United States
not A lover of small dogs, But that puppy is a living doll. What breed is it? For a long time now, I have been using small cuts of hot dogs in my training,I find they get desired results faster than other treats, other treats are given after training has been accomplished.. Word of caution, Dogs have an uncanny ability to pick out & chew up the most expensive shoe first,& will most likely continue to do so until, we overcome the habit of leaving shoes laying around.

You are now entering a wonderful relation ship with a living friend that will give you its love unconditionally.best wishes. joel

Should you ever have to correct her , DON'T HIT HER WITH YOUR HAND.
countrygirl58
Posted: Friday, May 31, 2013 7:31:56 PM

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Joined: 5/22/2012
Posts: 284
Have Patience.
Take the dog to training.
And train him/her to sleep in a doggie bed.
latinfoxy
Posted: Saturday, June 01, 2013 1:43:49 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/5/2011
Posts: 816
Location: Here
Thank you all for your messages! She is the cutest thing ever and super smart. Really i think i have like an indigo dog LOL

She is not even 2 months old, so i can't take her for walks yet, so yeah im potty training her to use news paper. So far she is doing really good peeing in there but not so much pooping. I think she is a snob and hates pooping in news paper :p

At the office everyone is in love with her (how could they not, look at her!!) and she is adapting really good. I think its great that im taking her right now, because when she gets older she will be use to be around people and noises.

Even though i cant remember the last time i clean floors this much, im completely happy with the decision that i made getting her! She is amazing!


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