Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

PRISM, The NSA and your right to privacy Options · View
redhot363236
Posted: Saturday, June 22, 2013 4:17:41 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/16/2011
Posts: 604
Location: United States
The plain and simple facts is that it's logistically impossible
If we use the industry standard of 60 seconds to trace one end of a phone call, tracing both ends of 3.6 billion phone calls would require 120 million man-hours a day.
If we use Rockwell International's labor model of four rotating 12-hour shifts, we find that we require a total of 25 million techs to do the job.
Which explains why the unemployment rate has dropped to zero in the past couple years
redhot363236
Posted: Saturday, June 22, 2013 4:47:49 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/16/2011
Posts: 604
Location: United States
budwilliams wrote:
Especially when it's left to a private contractor who can bill the Pentagon as much as they want


And they do ....
In the 70's and 80's, I worked in the aerospace industry, and one of the plant managers told me it was routine to multiply the price of a part by 30 when bidding a government contract.
And we were still getting contracts because other companies were padding their bids by even more
And once we had a contract, there were a lot of rumors going around about "creative book keeping" ..... Kitchen cabinets for the space shuttle and that kind of thing
DLizze
Posted: Saturday, June 22, 2013 7:56:06 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,501
Kristin said" ... If you're not a terrorist you have nothing to be concerned about when it comes to harvesting phone calls. Right? Are you really offended that the Feds gleaned your information when you called Grandma Jones or even your mistress?"

I would ask, if you've nothing to be afraid of, then why are you so fearful that you are willing to sacrifice one of the basic tenets that set this country apart from the rest of the world in the first place?

History will recognize Snowden and Ellsberg as heroes, just as it is beginning to recognize Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, NIxon, Reagan and many others for the shoddy thinkers and poor presidents they were.

"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
Liz
Posted: Monday, June 24, 2013 2:26:07 AM

Rank: Scarlet Seductress

Joined: 1/22/2013
Posts: 3,896
Location: In the sweet shop, United Kingdom


Are Skype making call snooping easier?


Skype have been accused of setting up a secret, internal project which explores the ways in which they will let intelligence agencies monitor calls while staying on the right side of the law.

Apparently, there are only a handful of employees who knew about the program, which is known as Project Chess, and set up before Microsoft bought the company.

If these allegations prove to be true, that means Skype were eavesdropping long before the Prism scandal which kicked off recently.

Skype would not comment on the allegations.

Last year, Skype faced similar accusations when they moved details to Microsoft and at the time, the company said: “Our position has always been that when a law enforcement entity follows the appropriate procedures, we respond where legally required and technically feasible.” However, if the New York Times findings are correct, Skype had already worked out how to co-operate with intelligence agencies before the Microsoft acquisition.

Then, Microsoft made the situation more sticky after they applied for a patent that would allow them to intercept VoIP calls. Researchers at the University of Mexico found that Microsoft already allowed third parties to intercept Skype, particularly in China where the government is allowed to look for censored words and phrases.

It isn’t looking good for Skype, especially given the amount of rivals that now exist.


budwilliams
Posted: Monday, June 24, 2013 5:46:01 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/17/2011
Posts: 482
Location: United States
It's probably safe to say it had a lot more to do with how much demographical data they could sell to advertising firms than with any government agency
WellMadeMale
Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 5:54:43 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
It's pretty fucked up when all the mainstream media jump aboard with this administration (with any administration actually) and raise the rally cry for war or to accuse someone of being a traitor.

Our American media was all aboard the War Bus in 2002-2003 with pResident Bush. There was not a single person with a smidgen of personal integrity or backbone who stood up and offered dissent, for fear of being labeled as a traitor to patriotism.

I'm watching similar behavior lately with regard to every single fucking one of these corksuckers tossing Snowden under the bus in favor of the NSA and the Obama administration.

And this is why I don't watch any of the cable news or network news programs for very long...as they all speak the same message from The Corporatocracy of the United States.

Fucking hypocritical, paid-off, lackey cheerleaders!

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/politics/2013/06/edward-snowden-traitor/66524/

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
redhot363236
Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 7:08:08 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/16/2011
Posts: 604
Location: United States
Thanks to Reagan's de-regulation policies of the 80's, 80% of the news media in this country is owned by one of three companies
WellMadeMale
Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 11:55:52 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
This is what a treasonous liar looks like



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 12:09:14 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
Alberto Gonzales - the miserable reprobate, told us over 7 years ago that this unnamed program was occurring. Nobody bothers to read jackshit anymore.

Also, Byron - unless you can point me to those paragraphs inside any of the Patriot Act - which authorizes the NSA to surveil upon Americans, I don't believe you can state that the Congress of 2001-2002 authorized anything of this nature.

The pResident at that time, signed yet another of his executive orders to authorize the NSA to intercept phone call metadata & emails between the USA and overseas...Gonzales and his Justice Department argued that what they were doing was constitutional, they claimed Congress authorized what they were doing - when they approved the use of force against al-Quaida.

We're being fucked by everyone...I'm about ready to sharpen up my pitchforks.




This article appeared on page A3 of The Kansas City Star, Friday April 7, 2006...the same paper which printed the article basically calling Bush a traitorous liar on page A1 - and I read both of them at my office desk that morning.

And kept this paper...I knew someday I'd want to use it for something.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
DLizze
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 3:44:14 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,501
Back in the 1950's at the height of the McCarthy era, there was a lot of talk in Congress about wire tapping. I asked my father (who was an electrical engineer at Westinghouse)about privacy on telephones. He said, "Your grandfather is working on developing microwave communication for Westinghouse. Someday soon, using the telephone is going to be exactly the same as broadcasting your message on radio. Because all telephone communication will be done by microwave, anyone with the proper equipment and knowledge will be able to listen in if they so choose." I have never forgotten that little bit of wisdom. If I want something truly private, I say it in person.

I say that, not to justify my government's stance on spyng - and that's what it is - spying. no matter that they are spying on their own population, but to call it "snooping" is to belittle the import of the action.

I find it interesting, what with all the hoopla about chasing down Mr. Snowden, there has suddenly been a "news" article that reveals the US has been spying on the EU., and that information is being attributed to Snowden, as well. Sounds to me like an attempt by the US government to (a) create news, and (b) further paint Mr. Snowden as a "criminal" who would act in a way contrary to our public interest.

Whenever I see something of this nature, I ask myself, "cui bono?"

"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
redhot363236
Posted: Tuesday, July 02, 2013 3:11:15 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/16/2011
Posts: 604
Location: United States
On the other hand, it wouldn't be the first time a right-wing activist concocted a bogus news story
DirtyMartini
Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 12:52:21 AM

Rank: Purveyor of Poetry & Porn

Joined: 10/19/2009
Posts: 5,722
Location: Right here on Lush Stories...
Sorry...but, this one just gave me a laugh...




You know you want it, you know you need it bad...get it now on Amazon.com...
Lush Erotica, an Anthology of Award Winning Sex Stories

WellMadeMale
Posted: Tuesday, August 06, 2013 8:08:36 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
This all sounds like something you'd fantasize only happening in the 1950s-80s Soviet Union.

(Reuters) - A secretive U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration unit is funneling information from intelligence intercepts, wiretaps, informants and a massive database of telephone records to authorities across the nation to help them launch criminal investigations of Americans.

Although these cases rarely involve national security issues, documents reviewed by Reuters show that law enforcement agents have been directed to conceal how such investigations truly begin - not only from defense lawyers but also sometimes from prosecutors and judges.

The undated documents show that federal agents are trained to "recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up where the information originated, a practice that some experts say violates a defendant's Constitutional right to a fair trial. If defendants don't know how an investigation began, they cannot know to ask to review potential sources of exculpatory evidence - information that could reveal entrapment, mistakes or biased witnesses.

"I have never heard of anything like this at all," said Nancy Gertner, a Harvard Law School professor who served as a federal judge from 1994 to 2011. Gertner and other legal experts said the program sounds more troubling than recent disclosures that the National Security Agency has been collecting domestic phone records. The NSA effort is geared toward stopping terrorists; the DEA program targets common criminals, primarily drug dealers.

"It is one thing to create special rules for national security," Gertner said. "Ordinary crime is entirely different. It sounds like they are phonying up investigations."

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
ByronLord
Posted: Tuesday, August 06, 2013 9:05:41 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 11/14/2010
Posts: 716
Location: Massachusetts, United States
WellMadeMale wrote:
Alberto Gonzales - the miserable reprobate, told us over 7 years ago that this unnamed program was occurring. Nobody bothers to read jackshit anymore.

Also, Byron - unless you can point me to those paragraphs inside any of the Patriot Act - which authorizes the NSA to surveil upon Americans, I don't believe you can state that the Congress of 2001-2002 authorized anything of this nature.


When prosecution was imminent, the GOP led Congress passed an immunity bill. Most of the Democrats fell into line rather than risk being accused of supporting terrorism.

The current situation is that the surveillance is blatantly unconstitutional but the courts refuse to allow anyone to challenge it by pretending that people have no standing The importance of Snowden's allegations is they may well establish standing to sue.

WellMadeMale
Posted: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 9:38:35 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
A timely and possibly profitable diversion.

Qaeda Messages Prompt U.S. Terror Warning

"Obama administration officials publicly declined to discuss what specific information had prompted the increased alarm and alerts, citing a desire to protect classified sources and methods.

But intercepting electronic communications is one of the National Security Agency’s main jobs, as the documents leaked by Edward J. Snowden, a former N.S.A. contractor, have only underscored. At the request of intelligence officials, The New York Times withheld some details about the intercepted communications.

Some analysts and Congressional officials suggested Friday that emphasizing a terrorist threat now was a good way to divert attention from the uproar over the N.S.A.'s data-collection programs, and that if it showed the intercepts had uncovered a possible plot, even better."

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
Magical_felix
Posted: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 9:47:34 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/3/2010
Posts: 4,547
Location: California
WellMadeMale wrote:
A timely and possibly profitable diversion.

Qaeda Messages Prompt U.S. Terror Warning

"Obama administration officials publicly declined to discuss what specific information had prompted the increased alarm and alerts, citing a desire to protect classified sources and methods.

But intercepting electronic communications is one of the National Security Agency’s main jobs, as the documents leaked by Edward J. Snowden, a former N.S.A. contractor, have only underscored. At the request of intelligence officials, The New York Times withheld some details about the intercepted communications.

Some analysts and Congressional officials suggested Friday that emphasizing a terrorist threat now was a good way to divert attention from the uproar over the N.S.A.'s data-collection programs, and that if it showed the intercepts had uncovered a possible plot, even better."


The old guy's use of links, italics and bolding gives this post a sense of urgency which is refreshing for this topic. The pep in his step makes me want to care about this. It makes me feel like I can make a difference. Look at him go.

+1 wmm



WellMadeMale
Posted: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 9:58:03 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
I will never be as clever, as you are now... I must resort to trix for some degree of effectiveness.

But I will always be more well made.

Some things are just the way they are.






If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 11:44:20 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,343
WellMadeMale wrote:
[size=7]Also, Byron - unless you can point me to those paragraphs inside any of the Patriot Act - which authorizes the NSA to surveil upon Americans, I don't believe you can state that the Congress of 2001-2002 authorized anything of this nature.


Ask and you shall receive WMM. Attached are the links to the Patriot Act. For this discussion let me point you to section 215. That is the section that delivers what you asked for. And yes...this section authorizes warrantless search of American citizens. Just to be complete, I also attached the copy of the amendments to the act and that is followed by some ACLU, who else would go after government over reach, documents on their battle to challenge the law and few other interesting reads.

This is quite a bit of reading. I hope ya'all are more thorough than some of the bloviating political experts that grace the Think Tank in Lush and you actually read what is here instead of just dismissing it because the legislation is real, legal and as you will find...judges have secretly authorized the practice besides the complaints leveled by the ACLU.

http://epic.org/privacy/terrorism/hr3162.html

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-107publ56/pdf/PLAW-107publ56.pdf

http://www.aclu.org/national-security/surveillance-under-usa-patriot-act

http://www.aclu.org/blog/technology-and-liberty/federal-appeals-court-rules-government-can-track-your-cell-phone-without

http://www.aclu.org/blog/technology-and-liberty-national-security/aclu-challenges-67-days-warrantless-cell-phone

http://www.slate.com/blogs/weigel/2013/06/07/nsa_prism_scandal_what_patriot_act_section_215_does.html





WellMadeMale
Posted: Thursday, August 08, 2013 3:19:26 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
Kristind wrote:


Ask and you shall receive WMM.

This is quite a bit of reading. I hope ya'all are more thorough than some of the bloviating political experts that grace the Think Tank in Lush and you actually read what is here instead of just dismissing it because the legislation is real, legal and as you will find...judges have secretly authorized the practice besides the complaints leveled by the ACLU.

http://www.aclu.org/national-security/surveillance-under-usa-patriot-act



Well, Kristin, I was asking Byron to go look all this up (incidentally, is he paying you for this excellent research?), as I was sure Congress had authorized it when they voted on passing the act, and I was attempting to goad him into doing his own legwork for a change.

But I was also pretty sure it was ramrodded down their throats by the Bush Administration as well as by the collective members of Congress being too chickenshit themselves, to hold off on voting for horseshit they claimed they had never read and didn't fully comprehend.

Thank you Kristin for placing all of this relevant information easily at our fingertips.

Not to cherry pick, but this little blurb inside the 2nd paragraph of the ACLU link I've left above...should also remind anyone who gives a shit...what occurred when this entire act was rolled out in front of Congress in the days immediately after 9/11. And how any thinking person could conceive and believe that all of this verbiage was written this precisely in the few weeks after 9/11 -- baffles me to this day. Those bastards had been working on this 'act' for many years prior to 9/11.

Most of the changes to surveillance law made by the Patriot Act were part of a longstanding law enforcement wish list that had been previously rejected by Congress, in some cases repeatedly. Congress reversed course because it was bullied into it by the Bush Administration in the frightening weeks after the September 11 attack.


If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, August 08, 2013 4:26:15 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,343
LMAO....no WMM...I am not on Byron's payroll. Just trying to contribute to the conversation and be a helpful bee. Sorry to have crashed your party, but I seem to be as passionate on these political subjects as you and some of the others here in the Think Tank.
I agree, the Patriot Act was rolled out so quickly following 9/11 that it makes you wonder if it wasn't in the works long before that tragic day. Which raises questions. If it was in the works...that means that it was not a Bush/Cheney conspiracy. It means it was possibly in the works in the Clinton/Gore administration. Which makes me wonder if there is an underlying methodology to our country that all/any President must adhere to once they take the office. And if that is true, then our President is only a figurehead with the liberty to play with a few of the issues of his liking.
Look at all the candidates that run and promise this and that and then completely reverse once they assume the office.

Every single President is guilty of that and I have always wondered why and why the people so easily accept it. I was i-fuckin'-rate when Obama disclosed that he would not go after Bush for the Iraq debacle. These were lies that wasted billions of taxpayers dollars...set-up special interest groups with billion dollar no-bid contracts, funny how they were all Bush crony companies...above all 4,300 + American soldiers were KILLED. DIED for reasons that can only be traced to Bush crony profiteering because all the evidence by U.N. groups and his own group of people that HE (Bush) assembled and sent out to the Iraqi desert came back and reported that the evidence is not there! That is not to mention the contractors that were killed and the Iraqi collateral civilians that were killed!

Please forgive my rant. You can all return to your regularly scheduled programs.

Whew!
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, August 09, 2013 7:28:46 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,213
Location: Cakeland, United States
Kristind wrote:

I agree, the Patriot Act was rolled out so quickly following 9/11 that it makes you wonder if it wasn't in the works long before that tragic day. Which raises questions.

If it was in the works...that means that it was not a Bush/Cheney conspiracy. It means it was possibly in the works in the Clinton/Gore administration.


Which makes me wonder if there is an underlying methodology to our country that all/any President must adhere to once they take the office. And if that is true, then our President is only a figurehead with the liberty to play with a few of the issues of his liking.
Look at all the candidates that run and promise this and that and then completely reverse once they assume the office.

Please forgive my rant. You can all return to your regularly scheduled programs.

Whew!


You've never heard of the Project for the New American Century? These fucksticks were badgering President Clinton's administration for several years, pushing him to go to war with Saddam, among other objectives.

They practically wrote the entire Patriot Act over the course of many years and were waiting to roll it out upon the American populace when they had their best chance.

All that required was years of planning (and they had that). You should see who was involved in PNAC... pretty much everyone who was anybody within the 1st Bush/Cheney administration - was also heavily involved with this nefarious organization.

But then again.... you could also look to, The Carlyle Group for further hints.

This is an interesting group of movers & shakers. When I 1st learned about them was 1999, they used to brag about their membership list. They have since gone off the radar where most the rest of the world can see who is a member, a charter member, or who sits on their board of directors very easily.

These asshats (members of both American political parties) as well as former heads of state of various countries around the world...

What do you think they have in common ( I mean, besides being motherfuckers ) ?



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
MadMartigan
Posted: Friday, August 09, 2013 7:58:15 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 6/17/2013
Posts: 1,881
Location: United States
Buz wrote:
Obama could have led the charge to do away with all of this massive attack on our privacy rights and civil liberties in the Patriot Act and all, but he instead has eagerly adopted its use. Shame on Bush, Shame on Obama, Shame on Congress.

George Orwell's 1984 is slowly becoming a reality.


I like Obama. Voted for him twice. Still believe in me.

But honestly?

I'm not naive to think ANY President of the US wouldn't give up the Patriot Act or any of its new forms.

Information is the gold/platinum standard these days. The more information you have, the more power you have. I think to think we could move toward something like government in the fictional world of Star Trek. But that ain't happening and never will. Politics are a crapshoot and corruption is inherent in its very fabric.

It doesn't help that large swathes of the public don't give a damn until things go badly. The voting public at large is just as guilty with what happens as the politicians they vote into office are.

There are legislators out there that battle for the little man, but most things revolve around the $$$$. It is the heavy donators that are the live blood of American politics and politicians are AlWAYS beholden to them first it seems.

Too many people only care about their direct lives, pay no attention to the news. Even when they do, they go to sources that have an agenda.

But never mind the fact that people do half the work for the NSA anyone by outing so much of their personal information on Facebook, Twitter, online message boards, etc, etc. We've plugged ourselves in and eased ourselves into a form of Orwellian dystopia as surely as the NSA has prodded us along.
Guest
Posted: Friday, August 09, 2013 8:49:54 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,343
MadMartigan wrote:
But never mind the fact that people do half the work for the NSA anyone by outing so much of their personal information on Facebook, Twitter, online message boards, etc, etc. We've plugged ourselves in and eased ourselves into a form of Orwellian dystopia as surely as the NSA has prodded us along.


Wow!!! A guy who uses words like Orwellian and dystopia and prodded all in the same sentence. (Wiggles in her seat until she remembers...he's still a Lambs fan.) DAMN!
MadMartigan
Posted: Friday, August 09, 2013 9:01:58 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 6/17/2013
Posts: 1,881
Location: United States
Kristind wrote:


Wow!!! A guy who uses words like Orwellian and dystopia and prodded all in the same sentence. (Wiggles in her seat until she remembers...he's still a Lambs fan.) DAMN!


book

hah.

I have a whole series of planned blog posts about how the over reliance on social media/networking is creating an inverse of Orwell's world where, instead of "face crimes" being the name of the game, not sharing everything about your personal life becomes a crime. Hyperbolic in a sense, until you think about the depth at which people share things online.
Buz
Posted: Friday, August 09, 2013 9:08:41 PM

Rank: The Linebacker

Joined: 3/2/2011
Posts: 5,172
Location: Atlanta, United States
President Obama has the legal authority to reign in much of the activity of the NSA. The White House knows what they are doing.

If you'd like to voice your opposition to all the spying on US citizens, just Google or Yahoo White House contact and you can get the email information.

For the time being we still have the right to email or snail mail the President and let him our opinion, but keep it reasonable. Any threats will get you in a lot of trouble, so don't be stupid.





I have written a new poem. It is called 'Long Twisty Woman.'
You can read it at: http://www.lushstories.com/stories/erotic-poems/long-twisty-woman.aspxx
Also, if you wish, check out my co-authored a story with the wonderful DanielleX. It is called 'Focus on Sex.'
You can read it at: http://www.lushstories.com/stories/quickie-sex/focused-on-sex-1.aspx

CrazyTexan
Posted: Friday, August 09, 2013 11:07:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 8/13/2010
Posts: 87
Location: United States
LadyX
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2013 4:35:27 PM

Rank: Thread Mediator

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,658
Location: United States
Hey everyone, Obama said he was starting a transparency website. So I guess that settles this crisis.

whew.
lafayettemister
Posted: Monday, August 19, 2013 11:36:52 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/4/2010
Posts: 6,342
Location: Alabama, United States
Partner of journalist who reported on NSA/Snowden case is held under for nine hours under anti-terrorism legislation.

"The 28-year-old Miranda was returning home to Brazil from Germany, where he was staying with Laura Poitras, a U.S. filmmaker who has worked with Greenwald on the NSA story, Greenwald said in his post. He also said British authorities had "zero suspicion" that Miranda was linked to a terror group and instead interrogated him about the NSA reporting and the contents of the electronic equipment he was carrying."

Link to story


Paging George Orwell.. Paging George Orwell...





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
LadyX
Posted: Monday, August 19, 2013 12:17:53 PM

Rank: Thread Mediator

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,658
Location: United States
I read about that yesterday. :(

This is where I apologize to people in the recent past who have been squawking about the coming police state.

It's weird, though- I almost want to say there was a presidential candidate not long ago that made transparency and limits to surveillance a major talking point. Can't for the life of me remember who it was...

LadyX
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 11:48:05 AM

Rank: Thread Mediator

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,658
Location: United States
UK gave US authorities a "heads-up" that they'd detained Greenwald's Partner.

No comment from Obama, of course, who is apparently just fine with equating journalistic probing with criminal activity. And it's this non-response that rates as among the most telling developments in this whole saga/new reality.

Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.