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Copyright Law and protecting your work Options · View
nicola
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2009 4:30:22 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,573
Location: The Orgasmatron
I was asked a question earlier about Copyright Law.

These sites should prove helpful to those interested in learning more about Copyright issues, and protecting your work: http://www.writersservices.com/wps/s1_copyright_law.htm and http://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/copyright/p03_copyright_notices.

In terms of a standard disclaimer to put on your work, please feel free to adapt these as you see fit. There is a section where you can put your Copyright notice in your profile (click the "settings" link, top of site).

Copyright ©2009 Author Name. All Rights Reserved.

A simple cover all statement. This is the most commonly used statement, and perhaps the clearest, and covers most eventualities. It simply means that you withhold all rights to the maximum extent allowable under law.

©2009 Author Name. This story may not be reproduced in any manner, without the express permission of the author. All such requests should be emailed to *email address*.

Of course you can also allow anyone to copy and redistribute your work too should you wish. I strongly suggest however putting in a clause, that the original author should be cited, and a link included to their work.

On a lighter note, this is my personal favourite copyright notice, from an author on this very site:

"All stories are property of the writer unless I give you permission to republish them. All those not taking this warning to heart will be hunted and eaten."
steffanie
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2009 1:05:11 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 11/10/2008
Posts: 139
nicola wrote:
"All those not taking this warning to heart will be hunted and eaten."



I had the guy that pinched my story served cold with a fine chianti. I used your recipe if you remember. Tasted delicious.
nicola
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2009 3:16:55 PM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,573
Location: The Orgasmatron
steffanie wrote:
I had the guy that pinched my story served cold with a fine chianti. I used your recipe if you remember. Tasted delicious.


3601

For anybody wondering how to check, http://www.copyscape.com is a good free place to check if your work has been plagiarised too. Please take it up with other site owners though if you do come across cases where your work has been reproduced without your permission.
Jillicious
Posted: Saturday, September 25, 2010 11:28:28 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/28/2009
Posts: 1,293
nicola wrote:
Of course you can also allow anyone to copy and redistribute your work too should you wish. I strongly suggest however putting in a clause, that the original author should be cited, and a link included to their work.


If you wish to take this route then you should take a look at the Creative Commons licenses. They work well for me. I don't think I'll ever make any money off of what I write. So releasing what I write under a copyleft license allows me to keep some rights while granting readers the ability to use in nearly any setting they wish. My copyright notice points to a Creative Commons license.

Thousands of user submitted stories removed from the site. You are nothing without your users or their freely submitted stories.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 2:09:06 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,966
I was always under the impression only an amateur would put a copy right on their work as the person who originally wrote the piece has copy right by law. At least that is the information I got from publishing houses, agents and editors. Might be different for the internet.
nicola
Posted: Sunday, April 17, 2011 12:35:04 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,573
Location: The Orgasmatron
cowgirlbrumby wrote:
I was always under the impression only an amateur would put a copy right on their work as the person who originally wrote the piece has copy right by law. At least that is the information I got from publishing houses, agents and editors. Might be different for the internet.


It's always better to be safe than sorry where copyright is concerned.
nicola
Posted: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 2:13:12 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,573
Location: The Orgasmatron
@erotichugs. They are your stories, you need not do anything necessarily.

The fact that you've written them in the first place (and most likely have proof of that) makes them your intellectual property. If you wish, simply add your copyright information to them also.

I'd encourage you to do that on all work you submit, anywhere on the web.

DirtyMartini
Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 9:20:06 PM

Rank: Purveyor of Poetry & Porn

Joined: 10/19/2009
Posts: 5,792
Location: Right here on Lush Stories..., United States
And someone in a Facebook group pointed out earlier that you don't have to figure out which forms to use these days, or download anything...there is a link to the eCO (Electronic Copyright Office)

U.S. Copyright Office - Online Services (eCO: Electronic Copyright Office)
http://www.copyright.gov/eco/

See, who says you can't learn anything on Facebook?



You know you want it, you know you need it bad...get it now on Amazon.com...
Lush Erotica, an Anthology of Award Winning Sex Stories

charmbrights
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2012 2:40:13 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 192
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
On another short story site when copyright was being discussed one author (MathGirl for those who remember her) came up with: "I just wish someone liked one of my stories enough to steal it. I would be so flattered."

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) on charmbrights.webs.com/novels.htm.
castlequeen
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 5:27:10 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/24/2009
Posts: 590
Apparently some people simply clone the entire site.
http://9erotica.com/

"A black cat crossing your path signifies that the animal is going somewhere." - Groucho Marx
Broken_Cowgirl
Posted: Monday, September 02, 2013 10:48:19 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/25/2013
Posts: 142
Location: The Whistle Stop Cafe, United States
Nicola I found nine of my old stories off this site on another site called 9erotica.com. Any advice on how to proceed on getting them removed?
nicola
Posted: Tuesday, September 03, 2013 3:17:42 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,573
Location: The Orgasmatron
Broken_Cowgirl wrote:
Nicola I found nine of my old stories off this site on another site called 9erotica.com. Any advice on how to proceed on getting them removed?


Hi Broken Cowgirl,

You should have a read of this thread: http://www.lushstories.com/forum/yaf_postst21993_Stolen-Work.aspx

He wasn't so "smart" when originally registering his real details...

Maybe write to him, or go and see him, ask him why he thinks it's fine stealing other people's work?

He's changed the whois information in the above linked thread, to a fake address in the USA. Which means, you can write to his registrar, tell them he's using fake information in his WHOIS details now.

That site has been abandoned from the looks of things.

Him, and people like him, basically steal stories by scraping all the big erotica sites, and then put them all on their sites / APPS etc, piggybacking off everyone's hard work.

There's nothing much you can do to stop them, they do it programmatically. We do what we can to stop the copy and pasters, but the professional thieves, it's next to impossible.

I'm not wasting my time chasing shadows. Registrars, hosting companies, the thieves, tend to totally ignore complaints. The good thing is, it doesn't matter they have the content, they have no traffic, search engines know the site has ripped off others, and they'll be empty vessels.

Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about them.

Nicola
RejectReality
Posted: Tuesday, September 03, 2013 9:45:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 1/29/2012
Posts: 97
Location: Alternate Reality, United States
9Erotica actually will take down the stories posted without permission if you can manage to find the contact links on the site. Posting comments on your work pointing to where it actually can be found will do the trick as well -- eventually.

Compared to the average story-stealing site, which is typically based in China or a former Russian satellite state and is nothing more than a vehicle for ads ( and sometimes malware ) it's among the least offensive.

One thing everyone needs to remember and not delude themselves about is copyright protection in the U.S. While you do have a copyright as soon as you produce the work, you can't bring anything to court unless you have a formal copyright filed with the U.S. copyright office. In other words, you have zero real legal standing without that formal copyright.

Even with a formal copyright, it's nearly impossible to persuade a court you've been damaged when the theft happened from a site where you posted the work for free.

That being said, most people don't understand that, and asserting your copyright with proof of where it was originally posted with your permission and a formal DMCA takedown is sufficient to encourage some interested parties to take action, provided you can find them and they aren't accomplices in shady activity.

Moral Suasion is also a factor. Amazon has been known to wipe out collections of stolen work when reported. They have no legal obligation to do so, and I'm sure they actually understand that, but they still do it when provided sufficient information to demonstrate the theft and a formal DMCA notification.

Don't think you're getting back any of the profits the thief made off your work, though.

The hard and simple truth is that once you release something into the wild of the internet, you lose control over it. The odds are better than not that someone is going to steal it in some way, shape, or form. You'll spend all your time chasing those thieves down their rabbit holes and never get any writing done if you stress too much over it.

Undoubtedly, people are going to argue with this *laugh* Someone always does. I did myself before taking the time to research, and being guided in that research by a long-published mainstream author and professional editor.

If you want to be depressed, take a reasonably unique line from the first few paragraphs of something you've written and put it in a Google search in quotes, so the search is looking for that exact series of words.

Just don't click any of the links that it finds unless you have iron-clad malware protection.

Broken_Cowgirl
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 12:59:56 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/25/2013
Posts: 142
Location: The Whistle Stop Cafe, United States
Thanks for the response Nicola, I appreciate the explanation. I don't understand why people would do that, but if you say not to worry, I won't. Thanks again! I love Lush!
nicola wrote:


Hi Broken Cowgirl,

You should have a read of this thread: http://www.lushstories.com/forum/yaf_postst21993_Stolen-Work.aspx

He wasn't so "smart" when originally registering his real details...

Maybe write to him, or go and see him, ask him why he thinks it's fine stealing other people's work?

He's changed the whois information in the above linked thread, to a fake address in the USA. Which means, you can write to his registrar, tell them he's using fake information in his WHOIS details now.

That site has been abandoned from the looks of things.

Him, and people like him, basically steal stories by scraping all the big erotica sites, and then put them all on their sites / APPS etc, piggybacking off everyone's hard work.

There's nothing much you can do to stop them, they do it programmatically. We do what we can to stop the copy and pasters, but the professional thieves, it's next to impossible.

I'm not wasting my time chasing shadows. Registrars, hosting companies, the thieves, tend to totally ignore complaints. The good thing is, it doesn't matter they have the content, they have no traffic, search engines know the site has ripped off others, and they'll be empty vessels.

Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about them.

Nicola
Guest
Posted: Monday, November 04, 2013 8:51:59 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,966
What's the ruling on if someome takes a poem I wrote and molds it to fit their needs? I wrote this poem called Slice of Cake. I wrote it to cheer up an xbox friend that was getting down. A few years later someone I know heard a song on the radio that made them stongly think of my poem. So I started listening to the station it was heard on and sure enough without telling me what poem or the name of the song imitating it I knew as soon as I heard it. I'm talking about Casting Crown's "Just Another Birthday". If you were to read "Slice of Cake" and listen to the song you would know what I mean. There is nothing I can do avout it. It's just a slap in the face.
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