Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Violence in the Media Options · View
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010 11:14:22 AM

Rank: Alpha Blonde

Joined: 2/17/2010
Posts: 6,234
Location: West Coast
Do you feel that the levels of violence portrayed in the media is having a negative effect on our society?

Do you think that images of violence has the potential to negatively influence criminal activity, especially with young people? For example, with the advent of the internet, recipes for bombs are readily available to anyone who wants them. And some of the most viewed youtube videos are those of a violent nature. Videogames are also regularly blamed for having influenced teens who commit shocking crimes.

Does this really impact society, or are we just looking for something else to blame when bad things happen?

Discuss....


Media examples in this case are television, videogames, movies, youtube, internet, newspapers, magazines, etc.


Guest
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010 11:22:20 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
i do think that the amount and content of information that is so readily available to our children can indeed be harmful. however, here is where parenting steps in. I control what he sees what he reads. he doesnt go on youtube without me knowing what he's seeing. he doesnt play games that i dont approve. at his friends homes he will walk away from games he know are not allowed. he even stood up to his great big uncle and told him "no, im not allowed to play that uncle" ( i have a really awesome kid) even when i watch golf i screen the commercials for content. not because they are bad but because i dont feel like explaining erectile dysfunction! haha

so yes, it can cause or incite bad behavior and a part of me finds the media irresponsible for what they put out there..the violence and the sex. but ultimately it is MY responsibility what media touches my children and what they are exposed to.
MrNudiePants
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010 11:40:35 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/10/2009
Posts: 2,140
Location: United States
LittleMissBitch wrote:
i do think that the amount and content of information that is so readily available to our children can indeed be harmful. however, here is where parenting steps in.


This. There's no doubt that questionable content is more readily available to children than ever before. I think it can only affect children where there's no affirmative role model showing alternatives in a positive way. If parents choose to let their kids be raised by TV and the internet, then those are the morals the kids are going to be raised up to emulate.

darkchallenger
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010 11:06:07 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 1/24/2010
Posts: 157
Location: On the trails somewhere, United States
I find the shows like Jerry Springer to be more of a bad influence on kids. All the reality shows that pit people against each other instead of encouraging cooperation. Yikes! Daytime TV programming is more alarming to me. Violence and agression in sports is way out of hand. There's lots of mayhem out there, but I still haven't heard of anyone killing someone with a video game. Guns seem to be used often, but I don't recall anyone being killed by a PS3. Maybe a Nintendo64.
DamonX
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010 11:32:01 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 1/25/2009
Posts: 795
darkchallenger wrote:
I find the shows like Jerry Springer to be more of a bad influence on kids. All the reality shows that pit people against each other instead of encouraging cooperation. Yikes! Daytime TV programming is more alarming to me. Violence and agression in sports is way out of hand. There's lots of mayhem out there, but I still haven't heard of anyone killing someone with a video game. Guns seem to be used often, but I don't recall anyone being killed by a PS3. Maybe a Nintendo64.


Please explain.
LadyX
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 5:10:01 AM

Rank: Artistic Tart

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,827
darkchallenger wrote:
Violence and agression in sports is way out of hand. There's lots of mayhem out there, but I still haven't heard of anyone killing someone with a video game. Guns seem to be used often, but I don't recall anyone being killed by a PS3. Maybe a Nintendo64.


I agree with you that video game systems aren't killers, and that adults acting the fool on talk shows are a terrible example for kids- but other than that, I probably couldn't agree with you less. You feel like violence in the media- gangster culture and military kill-offs, glorified in movies, music and videos, isn't really that big of a problem, but martial arts and coverage sacks are? For lots of kids, sports are part of what saves them FROM a life of lawlessness and violence. It teaches them perseverence, teamwork, the payoff of hard work and practice- unless you're Allen Iverson, and hopefully, how to be a gracious winner and loser.

You say video games aren't a problem, but I'd point you to games like Grand Theft Auto, where you can go around being a gangster, running people over, shooting them. Or any number of military games, where you're in battle, shooting as many other people as quickly and brutally as possible. Do those games kill? Of course not, but they're part of media that glorfies or at least trivializes violence, as if it has no consequences and is just part of life. The latter is definitely true, but the former is NEVER true. Media shows it for shock value, but hardly ever shows the aftermath, and without that, no lesson can be taught.

All of this is out the window if the parents, or grandparents or sibilings-whoever is doing the raising, act like parents and help the kids to learn right from wrong, fantasy from reality. Otherwise, we have to figure big chunks of that out on our own, and I can tell you that self-learning it has a lasting effect: you become comfortable with certain things in life even though if you're smart you know there's something wrong with it. It doesn't mean you act on it all the time, but reality is individual, and if you as a parent aren't there to help shape it for your kids, you're rolling the dice on what they end up with on their own.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 6:04:46 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
LadyX wrote:
You say video games aren't a problem, but I'd point you to games like Grand Theft Auto, where you can go around being a gangster, running people over, shooting them. Or any number of military games, where you're in battle, shooting as many other people as quickly and brutally as possible. Do those games kill? Of course not, but they're part of media that glorfies or at least trivializes violence, as if it has no consequences and is just part of life. The latter is definitely true, but the former is NEVER true. Media shows it for shock value, but hardly ever shows the aftermath, and without that, no lesson can be taught.


I have to disagree... I love GTA and to be honest, I find them quite amusing. But does that make me want to go out and steal a car and run over a prostitute and rob her of her hard earned money or go bash innocent bystanders with a big purple dildo? As much as I would love to say yes, I am afraid that I have to say that I have never, or nor do I, have any desire to do so. Maybe one day I will, when I have been told I have 24 hours to live... glasses8

I do have problems with certain TV shows such as Jackass and Springer... but those sort of shows only teaches kids to be idiots such as themselves, not criminals.

Who do I blame? I blame the glorification of war from our very own governments and lack of discipline from the courts and parents. I blame the generation Y who think they are too good to work as labourer's etc or what they class as a menial work, and then turn to crime when they can't afford to pay their parents board. I don't blame the media... I blame the system.

LadyX
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 7:10:22 AM

Rank: Artistic Tart

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,827
SweetBitch wrote:


I have to disagree... I love GTA and to be honest, I find them quite amusing. But does that make me want to go out and steal a car and run over a prostitute and rob her of her hard earned money or go bash innocent bystanders with a big purple dildo? As much as I would love to say yes, I am afraid that I have to say that I have never, or nor do I, have any desire to do so. Maybe one day I will, when I have been told I have 24 hours to live... glasses8

I do have problems with certain TV shows such as Jackass and Springer... but those sort of shows only teaches kids to be idiots such as themselves, not criminals.

Who do I blame? I blame the glorification of war from our very own governments and lack of discipline from the courts and parents. I blame the generation Y who think they are too good to work as labourer's etc or what they class as a menial work, and then turn to crime when they can't afford to pay their parents board. I don't blame the media... I blame the system.


After reading your comments and mine, SB, I really don't think we disagree on video games. I think GTA is entertaining- my half-brother was addicted to GTA:SA, and no, he didn't turn into a murderer. I don't want to see it, or any game, banned- my only point about video games was this:

Quote:
All of this is out the window if the parents, or grandparents or sibilings-whoever is doing the raising, act like parents and help the kids to learn right from wrong, fantasy from reality. Otherwise, we have to figure big chunks of that out on our own.


You, I assume, turned out just fine and unaffected by that particular game because you had other powerful influences. Either that, or a commendable sense of self to be able to separate fantasy from reality as it relates to your life at a young age, or you were already an adult when you played it. Don't dismiss how much these things can affect young people- it's not as simple as just 'knowing' it's fake, and that the actions depicted in them are not to ever be applied to real life.

As to your other point- where you get to who you blame- I agree, the 'system', however you choose to define it, sucks. Warmongering governments and terrorist groups definitely make lives appear expendable, which is terrible for kids to see. Parents of course can defuse most of the bad influences by being stronger and more present than media and environment by default, it really can't be mentioned enough in this discussion, because I think it's the key point. "Things" are bad influences, but it doesn't mean they are "bad" or undeserving of being around, but those of us that help to raise our young brothers and sisters in our village- whether that village is your house, or your neighborhood, or your extended family, have to realize what's out there and be proactive.

I was able to, and did, watch R and even triple-X programs when I was 6, 7, 8 years old on the tv and internet. Parents weren't around, we did as we pleased. Between that, and living in a crime-heavy area, did I learn anything good? No, I thought shooting people was what you did when you wanted something taken care of, and I knew sexually explicit info before I had any idea what it really meant or how it related to me or healthy people. It doesn't mean those things should be blamed (because what does that accomplish? If you're gonna point the finger, blame yourself for not counteracting it when it comes to influencing kids!), or worse, banned- but we have to realize what we're doing to kids simply by leaving them to their own devices so young.

The underclass and crime, I'm afraid, is much more complex jump, and deserving of it's own thread if it's to be discussed.icon_smile
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 7:53:33 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
Quote:
If you're gonna point the finger, blame yourself for not counteracting it when it comes to influencing kids!), or worse, banned- but we have to realize what we're doing to kids simply by leaving them to their own devices so young.


thats exactly right. no matter what the media puts out there we, the parents, are the first line of defense. and when you are MIA as a parent then blaming media games etc is like blaming big tobacco for you lung cancer. personal responsibility is key and that extends to your children. why do so many parents not understand that and like LadyX said..leave their kids to their own devices?

Dancing_Doll
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 7:54:24 AM

Rank: Alpha Blonde

Joined: 2/17/2010
Posts: 6,234
Location: West Coast

Re the issue with video games. I don't believe that playing a violent video game will cause you to become a criminal. I do think it can be an influencer if someone is already in a vulnerable state (ie. various factors like socioeconomics, marginalization, depression, poor parental influence, negative peer influence etc). There's no question that video games glorify the gangster, outlaw or combat lifestyle while often showing disrespect for the law, police, or authorities. Someone in a normal psychological state can take this for what it is meant to be - entertainment. But someone who is already have psychological issues and is playing video games and is more attuned to violence in all forms in the media is definitely going to get some basic messaging that there is some glorification of violence or criminal activity. Does this mean, there should be censorship? No... it should mean that parents, teachers or other influencers should be more attune to what is happening with their kids, spouse, friend etc. and see this as a warning sign that might do well with some intervention. Mark Chapman felt that the book Catcher in the Rye "motivated" him to shoot John Lennon. If you're already in a vulnerable psychological state, then you can always find something to provoke or influence you... even if it's something that would be totally benign to the rest of the world.

As far as video games influencing kids... yes, it happens. But if it DOES happen, then there was something wrong before the video game ever fell into that kids hands.

For discussion sake, I thought I'd add a few of the most notorious cases of the supposed impact of video games on crimes committed by youth as they were used by their legal defence teams. I've often wondered how influential these arguments have been to a jury in a criminal case.

"Harris and Klebold enjoyed playing the bloody, shoot-'em-up video game Doom, a game licensed by the U.S. Army to train soldiers to effectively kill (3)
(Anderson and Dill did not cite a source for the use of Doom by the military. However, according to the web site of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center, Doom II was indeed licensed in 1996 and transformed into Marine Doom, which "teaches concepts such as mutual fire team support, protection of the automatic rifleman, proper sequencing of an attack, ammunition discipline and succession of command" [see www.tec.army.mil/TD/tvd/survey/Marine_Doom.html]).

"We've been seeing a whole rash of shootings throughout this country and in Europe that relate back to kids who obsessively play violent video games. The kids involved as shooters in Columbine were obsessively playing violent video games. We know after the Beltway sniper incident where the 17-year-old was a fairly good shot, but Mr. Muhammad, the police tell us, got him to practice on an ultra-violent video game in sniper mode to break down his hesitancy to kill."
—Washington State Rep. Mary Lou Dickerson, on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, July 7, 2003. (She co-sponsored legislation to ban the sale or rental of games that portray violence against police to children under 17.)

"The series of random shootings by Lee Malvo and John Muhammad created panic in the Washington, DC area. News headlines repeated claims by Malvo's defense team that the youth had been brainwashed and trained to kill while playing video games with sniper shooting modes such as Halo, Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon, and Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Covert Ops. The jury was shown clips of these games and of the film The Matrix."

http://ap.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/28/2/144



Guest
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:46:12 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
Would you let a stranger talk to your children, especially if you know the stranger teaches socially, humanistically undesirable and unacceptable attitudes? Unfortunately, it occurs frequently without your control : TV, movies, computer programs, the Internet, video games, and (maybe you don’t believe) music lyrics and videos, and all related advertising. Your children talk to stranger everyday on TV, as they watch a movie, or tv-shows.

Children are great imitators, and for this reason it is so important what they watch. They learn by repeating what they see. Something can be buried deep within their subconscious. Some factors may be a signal to activate this memory. Then you should be careful about what your children save in their subconscious.

A child can assume he is spiderman and jump from the window. It is not joke, it happened. And now think what would happen, if he assumed he is a serial murderer…(I know it is an extreme example)

And many research say that heavy doses of TV violence increases the likelihood of aggressive behavior, particularly in males, violent TV programs lead to aggressive behavior in children and teenagers.

You can think parents can control their children, but in our world, it is not so easy. Maybe you don’t let your children have an internet in their room, but when you give him (or her) a iPhone, he can connect with internet so easily. you cannot control your children always. I think people should teach their children what it is right, what it is wrong
I wanted to write many things about it but my english is not enough, and I guess everybody can find some research about it...protect your children from violance....
LadyX
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:47:45 AM

Rank: Artistic Tart

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,827
Great post, Aragon :) and no worries about the English. Hope to see you around more often.hello2
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 10:49:51 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
The media have to report what is exceptional --that's news, the trouble is everyone believes it's going on everywhere all the time --that's sad.
Magical_felix
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 10:57:48 AM

Rank: Wild at Heart

Joined: 4/3/2010
Posts: 4,870
Location: California
Before the Internet, television, movies and video games little boys played with toy guns and wooden swords. Those little boys weren't pretending to have lemonade parties with those fake toy weapons. They were playing at killing each other. I really don't think we are any more violent today than we were back then. You can take it back even farther than the middle ages and argue the case that society was twice as violent as it is now and they didn't have any media in the form we have it today.



sprite
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 11:45:56 AM

Rank: Her Royal Spriteness

Joined: 6/18/2010
Posts: 14,415
Location: My Tower, United States
My feelings. While the amount of violence in the media might not prompt most people into violent behavior, i think that it tends to desensitize us to it greatly. just look around at what we find funny now. Jackass-like youtube vids where people get chuckles out of someone getting hurt. just go to an action movie and listen to the chuckles when someone gets shot or thrown out a window or what have you, and yes, i've done it too, i'm not standing on a soap box here - Kick Ass is one of my favorite movies of the year and it's over the top violent AND stars a 13 yo girl.

now, the thing is, i am an adult, so i can sort of filter this out, but kids are exposed to this as well and i can't help thinking that they are going to be molded by this attitude. i remember seeing kids in the audience when i saw the film - obviously, this is a parenting issue - no WAY they should be been in that theatre, but then, parents are so exposed to violence even in TV shows, that they just see it as normal. look at Jack Bauer in 24, for example. does a season go by without extensives torture and killing?

Now, to get UP on my soap box. Somehow it's ok to share this level of violence with kids, but omg, nudity or sex is not? i think we have things a bit backwards here.

for the record, last DVD bought - Toy Story 3 and most anticiapated movie - Entangled. :) low on violence, high on good story telling - these are the movies i'd take my child to, if i had one. Parents need to be responsible and there ARE a lot of good movies out there for families! pick wisely. :)

http://www.lushstories.com/stories/hardcore/west-coast-games-part-one-the-beach.aspx
Jacknife
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 6:14:20 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/27/2008
Posts: 196
Location: United Kingdom
Are humans being are we not genetically programed in someway to fight. You can probably pull it back to the caveman, but it is still there and we have not evolved out of it. Personally I found things like video games a way to safly release some anger and frustration. Other ways include using a punch bag, or doing a martial art. all have inherent violence in them

Personally I am of the opinion that human being do not need the encouragement in order to be violent. Now TV and games get blamed, previously it was boxing and before that it was probably jousting, People just want something to blame for human failings
Guest
Posted: Saturday, November 06, 2010 10:42:10 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
A movie came out in 2003 called "Elephant", I think it's worth a look as it pertains to this thread.

I personally don't believe we are hardwired for war, fighting, or aggression except for those moments when self preservation is at hand. Hell, even shaolin monks know how to kill, but only in defense. I do believe that some people are just plain crazy, or are more inclined to use violence to solve things, and media has nothing to do with it. I assume many of you have read about war atrocities committed by soldiers. In an environment where war, killing, and the value of life becomes skewed, most do not go over the brink, but some do, and those that do would probably find a way to commit violent acts even if they were not in a war.
This simple thinking is not intended to address people like Gacy, or Gein. In those cases there was severe mental trauma and physical/mental abuse. In line with that, I believe it is the parent/parenting figure that has the most influence on the kids. For the most part, it is not the lack of parental screening, but the parents active role in making a child violent. Violence in the media then becomes the ever present source in how to carry out the violent thoughts kids/young adults start to ponder.

Magical_felix
Posted: Monday, November 08, 2010 12:50:45 PM

Rank: Wild at Heart

Joined: 4/3/2010
Posts: 4,870
Location: California
Quote:
In those cases there was severe mental trauma and physical/mental abuse. In line with that, I believe it is the parent/parenting figure that has the most influence on the kids. For the most part, it is not the lack of parental screening, but the parents active role in making a child violent. Violence in the media then becomes the ever present source in how to carry out the violent thoughts kids/young adults start to ponder.



Your last post, eiotis123, reminds me of a quote from the movie "Sream." (not exactly a masterpiece I know.)



Sidney Prescott: You sick fucks, you've seen one too many movies!

Billy: Now Sid, don't you blame the movies, movies don't create psychos, movies make psychos more creative!



Guest
Posted: Monday, November 08, 2010 5:30:29 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 531,807
Crap...my self esteem is now at an all time low. I think like the dude who wrote for dawson's creek.

Although, I did find the rules of horror films in Scream very funny.
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.