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Read any book... when you come to a word unknown to you, tell me what it was and what it means? Options · View
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, December 15, 2010 1:56:26 PM

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I want you to read a book or newspaper, when you come to a word that you have no idea what it means, I want you to look that word up.
Then tell me what it means, and also put that new word into a brand-new sentence!

Go for it!

My new word from yesterday was from Thomas Hardy's book called Jude the Obscure: Eminently = it's a adjective (doing word) this word is used to emphasize a positive quality.

She is eminently brilliant at having an orgasm, when I'm underneath her.
SweetPenny
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 8:25:43 AM

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HoneyBee000 wrote:
Eminently = it's a adjective (doing word) this word is used to emphasize a positive quality.


Actually, I believe "eminently" is an adverb. "Eminent" is an adjective.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 12:06:51 PM

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SweetPenny wrote:
HoneyBee000 wrote:
Eminently = it's a adjective (doing word) this word is used to emphasize a positive quality.


Actually, I believe "eminently" is an adverb. "Eminent" is an adjective.


Correctamundo! I got mixed up read the small print in the dictionary. adj. versus adv. Thanks for pointing that out.

Now I need to read up what an adverb does ha ha evil4
Guest
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 12:12:46 PM

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One of the reasons I posted this thread is that discovering a new word and putting it into a sentence is very hard. I find this hard to get my head thnking how to put a new word in a story, I wonder if other writer's feel like a new discovered word feels awquard!
Guest
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 12:29:14 PM

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HoneyBee000 wrote:
One of the reasons I posted this thread is that discovering a new word and putting it into a sentence is very hard. I find this hard to get my head thnking how to put a new word in a story, I wonder if other writer's feel like a new discovered word feels awquard!


I think this is a great thread. I just need some time for reading a book, and then remember to check out those words I don't really know. Often I can guess at the meaning because of the context, but you're pushing me to work, HB, and I'll give it a go. LOL
Guest
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 12:39:27 PM

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gypsymoth wrote:
HoneyBee000 wrote:
One of the reasons I posted this thread is that discovering a new word and putting it into a sentence is very hard. I find this hard to get my head thnking how to put a new word in a story, I wonder if other writer's feel like a new discovered word feels awquard!


I think this is a great thread. I just need some time for reading a book, and then remember to check out those words I don't really know. Often I can guess at the meaning because of the context, but you're pushing me to work, HB, and I'll give it a go. LOL


a newspaper will do Gyp! Anything...
Guest
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 12:41:50 PM

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gypsymoth wrote:
HoneyBee000 wrote:
One of the reasons I posted this thread is that discovering a new word and putting it into a sentence is very hard. I find this hard to get my head thnking how to put a new word in a story, I wonder if other writer's feel like a new discovered word feels awquard!


I think this is a great thread. I just need some time for reading a book, and then remember to check out those words I don't really know. Often I can guess at the meaning because of the context, but you're pushing me to work, HB, and I'll give it a go. LOL


what i do is get them little mini stick it notes evertime I come across a word I don't know, I pop a stick it note underneath the new word, write the word on the stick it note.

Then when I find it in the dictionary I highlight the word so I know I've come across it before. God I sound like a write geek ha ha but it makes me happygeek
magnificent1rascal
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 1:02:12 PM

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HoneyBee000 wrote:
Then when I find it in the dictionary I highlight the word so I know I've come across it before. God I sound like a write geek ha ha but it makes me happygeek


HoneyBee,

I come from a family of word geeks, and I'm proud of it! My grandfather had to drop out of school when his mother died, which happened to be when he was in sixth grade. He decided to teach himself, in a way, by reading the dictionary. He would read until he reached a word he didn't know, and then he would use that word until it became ingrained in his memory. He learned at least one new word a day that way. As a child, I thought he must have gone to college to have the vast vocabulary he did, until my mother explained how he'd done it.

I love your challenge, and I'll be participating in it as soon as I find time to read something!


Maggie Rascal
nicola
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 10:22:30 PM

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I rarely come across a cromulent word I don't know the meaning of these days, but great thread!
Guest
Posted: Friday, December 17, 2010 11:11:18 AM

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magnificent1rascal wrote:
HoneyBee000 wrote:
Then when I find it in the dictionary I highlight the word so I know I've come across it before. God I sound like a write geek ha ha but it makes me happygeek


HoneyBee,

I come from a family of word geeks, and I'm proud of it! My grandfather had to drop out of school when his mother died, which happened to be when he was in sixth grade. He decided to teach himself, in a way, by reading the dictionary. He would read until he reached a word he didn't know, and then he would use that word until it became ingrained in his memory. He learned at least one new word a day that way. As a child, I thought he must have gone to college to have the vast vocabulary he did, until my mother explained how he'd done it.

I love your challenge, and I'll be participating in it as soon as I find time to read something!


Your story reminds me of my Grandma's mother; she randomly opened the dictionary at any page and look for a word un-known to her. A lot like your Grandfather's method. Great idea :)
DirtyMartini
Posted: Friday, December 17, 2010 11:21:11 AM

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Cromulent: definition: 1.Fine, acceptable or normal; excellent, realistic, legitimate or authentic

My sentence...

"Until today, I would have thought a cromulent was a type of English breakfeast pasty but now I know better."


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DirtyMartini
Posted: Friday, December 17, 2010 10:09:28 PM

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eyrie: a nest of an eagle or other bird...

Heck, I read it today in one of Pete's poems...I always need a dictionary when I read his stuff...

Sentence..."Pete is the only guy I know who could use a word like eyrie in a poem and make it sound good."


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Guest
Posted: Monday, December 20, 2010 5:27:25 PM

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Reading money stuff came across this one:

Disintermediation
Cutting out the middleman. Disintermediation has become a buzz word in financial services in particular, as competitive and technological changes have done away with the need for established intermediaries.
TopThis
Posted: Tuesday, December 21, 2010 10:18:11 AM

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PROCLIVITY (noun): an inclination or predisposition toward something; especially : a strong inherent inclination toward something objectionable

Synonyms: affection, affinity, aptitude, bent, bias, bone, devices, disposition, genius, habitude, impulse, leaning, partiality, penchant, predilection, predisposition, inclination, propensity, tendency, turn

Sentence: Her proclivity to meticulousness ensured every demand had been met.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, January 06, 2011 4:24:51 PM

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Very hard for me because I read voraciously and my vocabulary is extensive. I came across this word today in a book I'm reading. They explained the meaning within the book by mocking the character who used it.

Hudibrastic(adjective) - Meaning - of, or relating to a style of English verse that mocks heroic verse.

The hudibrastic has been traditionally used for satire. Jonathan Swift, for example, wrote nearly all of his poetry in hudibrastics!
SweetPenny
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 11:19:45 AM

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Honeybee, this thread actually gave me the inspiration for my new story. Thanks!
DirtyMartini
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 12:29:14 PM

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SweetPenny wrote:
Honeybee, this thread actually gave me the inspiration for my new story. Thanks!


Let me guess, you're going to write a whole story using words that nobody knows???


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SweetPenny
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 1:21:44 PM

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DirtyMartini wrote:
SweetPenny wrote:
Honeybee, this thread actually gave me the inspiration for my new story. Thanks!


Let me guess, you're going to write a whole story using words that nobody knows???


It's already up. Go see for yourself.
DirtyMartini
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 1:40:50 PM

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SweetPenny wrote:
DirtyMartini wrote:
SweetPenny wrote:
Honeybee, this thread actually gave me the inspiration for my new story. Thanks!


Let me guess, you're going to write a whole story using words that nobody knows???


It's already up. Go see for yourself.


I did as told...clever story, btw...

What happened to Miss Bee...did she buzz off???
I got no place to post bee pictures now...




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SweetPenny
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 1:42:36 PM

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myself
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 2:26:09 PM

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it's not a new word to me but, i did just take the time the other day to learn what it meant : )


Logistics (the management of transportation including movement to transformation) -this is my take on the word

"Logistics is considered to have originated in the military's need to supply themselves with arms, ammunition and rations as they moved from their base to a forward position. In ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine empires, military officers with the title Logistikas were responsible for financial and supply distribution matters.

The term logistics comes from the Greek logos (λόγος), meaning "speech, reason, ratio, rationality, language, phrase", and more specifically from the Greek word logistiki (λογιστική), meaning accounting and financial organization. The word logistics has its origin in the French verb loger to lodge or to quarter. Its original use was to describe the science of movement, supplying & maintenance of military forces in the field. Later on it was used to describe the management of materials flow through an organization, from raw materials through to finished goods." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logistics#Origins_and_definition

edit -forgot the sentence lol -here's two

I manage the logistics of transportation at the bus station.
Logistics helps me understand the process of refining.

Torture the data long enough and they will confess to anything.
DirtyMartini
Posted: Monday, January 10, 2011 2:59:00 PM

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SweetPenny wrote:


Thanks...I need a score-card to keep track of people deleting their accounts and coming back...icon_smile


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DirtyMartini
Posted: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 6:43:48 PM

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Wag: A humorous or droll person; a wit.

"Heck, I've been on the planet almost 50 years and never heard the word 'wag' before...now I find out I might be one..."


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DirtyMartini
Posted: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 5:08:11 AM

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Blancmange: is a sweet dessert commonly made with milk or cream and sugar thickened with gelatin, cornstarch or Irish moss,[1] and often flavored with almonds. It is usually set in a mould and served cold

"I just added the word 'blancmange' to my vocabulary thanks to Lush Stories, can't wait to go out and use it."


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Guest
Posted: Thursday, January 27, 2011 11:06:44 AM

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SweetPenny wrote:
Honeybee, this thread actually gave me the inspiration for my new story. Thanks!


Hmmmm I'm very pleased about that! :)
Guest
Posted: Thursday, January 27, 2011 11:10:53 AM

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DirtyMartini wrote:
Blancmange: is a sweet dessert commonly made with milk or cream and sugar thickened with gelatin, cornstarch or Irish moss,[1] and often flavored with almonds. It is usually set in a mould and served cold

"I just added the word 'blancmange' to my vocabulary thanks to Lush Stories, can't wait to go out and use it."



I thought there was a spelling mistake, but I do want to point out that this word is not pronounced as it is written.

Bla>mange Well that's how we would say it in the UK.

Not Blanc which means white in french, do not pronounce it like that ha ha.
nicola
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2011 1:17:24 AM

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Sobriquet - it's a variant of nickname apparently. One of 3 I couldn't figure out in the Sydney Morning Herald crossword today.
Guest
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2011 3:42:45 AM

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nicola wrote:
Sobriquet - it's a variant of nickname apparently. One of 3 I couldn't figure out in the Sydney Morning Herald crossword today.



How do I pronounce it? I have trouble with new words when I come across them, sometimes I can't figure out how to say the word and if I can't say it I'm less likly to use it!
Guest
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2011 6:21:48 AM

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HoneyBee000 wrote:
nicola wrote:
Sobriquet - it's a variant of nickname apparently. One of 3 I couldn't figure out in the Sydney Morning Herald crossword today.



How do I pronounce it? I have trouble with new words when I come across them, sometimes I can't figure out how to say the word and if I can't say it I'm less likly to use it!


I suggest you try it like this: so brie kay -- but run it all together, sobriekay. At least that is how it's pronounced in French. Dictionary.com gives this pronunciation guide to it, which is close to my attempt at explaining it: soh-bruh-key

Ok HB, now just lean down close to the screen, because I'm whispering it to you, so you can actually hear it.

Sobriquet.

There. Didn't that sound lovely? ;-)
Guest
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2011 6:27:45 AM

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gypsymoth wrote:
HoneyBee000 wrote:
nicola wrote:
Sobriquet - it's a variant of nickname apparently. One of 3 I couldn't figure out in the Sydney Morning Herald crossword today.



How do I pronounce it? I have trouble with new words when I come across them, sometimes I can't figure out how to say the word and if I can't say it I'm less likly to use it!


I suggest you try it like this: so brie kay -- but run it all together, sobriekay. At least that is how it's pronounced in French. Dictionary.com gives this pronunciation guide to it, which is close to my attempt at explaining it: soh-bruh-key

Ok HB, now just lean down close to the screen, because I'm whispering it to you, so you can actually hear it.

Sobriquet.

There. Didn't that sound lovely? ;-)


hahahahaha nice one Gypsy hee hee Brilliant! laughing6
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