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Phrases you wish people would get right Options · View
nicola
Posted: Sunday, October 17, 2010 3:49:30 AM

Rank: Matriarch

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Location: The Orgasmatron
"I could care less"

The right phrase is:

"I couldn't care less".

If you could care less, then you obviously do care somewhat.

"Less then" as well. It's "less than".

Thank you icon_smile
sprite
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 10:26:59 AM

Rank: Her Royal Spriteness

Joined: 6/18/2010
Posts: 14,610
Location: My Tower, United States
For all intents and purposes NOT for all intensive purposes :)

http://www.lushstories.com/stories/hardcore/west-coast-games-part-one-the-beach.aspx
MrNudiePants
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 10:37:20 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/10/2009
Posts: 2,141
Location: United States
"And so forth, and so on."


And so forth... AND so on?

Guest
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 9:55:31 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
The use of Noone. Instead of no one. As in "No one cares about me."


Anyways. No s please. "Anyways, I just wanted to say hello."
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 10:16:07 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
chefkathleen wrote:
Anyways. No s please. "Anyways, I just wanted to say hello."


I can understand you point, however, the example you used is dialogue and therefore should be given a little more leeway. It's just a fact that people talk that way, unforturnately.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 11:42:29 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
Unfortunately being the key word. Mispronunciation of words is a pet peeve of mine.
I cringe when I hear someone say height as hei-th.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 12:06:36 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
chefkathleen wrote:
Unfortunately being the key word. Mispronunciation of words is a pet peeve of mine.
I cringe when I hear someone say height as hei-th.


I have an acquaintance who pronounces 'clothes' as 'closes'.

It makes my head hurt to hear that.

By the way; "acquaintance". That is one mean word to spell! lol
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 2:40:07 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
gypsymoth wrote:
chefkathleen wrote:
Unfortunately being the key word. Mispronunciation of words is a pet peeve of mine.
I cringe when I hear someone say height as hei-th.


I have an acquaintance who pronounces 'clothes' as 'closes'.

It makes my head hurt to hear that.

By the way; "acquaintance". That is one mean word to spell! lol


Thanks gawd for spell check. God is hard to spell too. 6
WellMadeMale
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 6:13:08 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,299
Location: Cakeland, United States
Can I aks you a question?

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
magnificent1rascal
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 1:13:00 AM

Rank: Divine Rapscallion

Joined: 8/15/2010
Posts: 3,018
Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
New-cue-lar

angry9

Maggie Rascal
snowluvr
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 5:31:06 PM

Rank: Rookie Scribe

Joined: 10/13/2010
Posts: 3
Location: New England
sugarbabe
Posted: Thursday, October 21, 2010 11:07:30 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/30/2010
Posts: 691
Location: northeast, United States
I cringe when I hear someone say "TRUST ME"

sex is like a joke...it's only good if you get it


Guest
Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 3:45:17 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
When people use the verb 'to OF' - could OF, should OF, would OF and so on - I feel as if I want to strike them down like a righteous Nemesis!

I also hate it when someone writes 'TOW the line'.

Memo to snowlover - I think you'll find that 'gesundheit' is German for 'good health', like an English speaker saying 'bless you' when someone sneezes, because your soul was thought to be in danger.
obscura
Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 7:20:34 AM

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Joined: 9/10/2010
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Location: Zef Side
'Yin/yang', not 'ying/yang.'

'A whole other', not 'a whole nother.'

'As long as', not 'so long as.'

'Let it be', not 'leave it be.' Just like the Beatles song suggests.

Excetera...

Oh no wait, I mean, et cetera.

magnificent1rascal
Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 11:04:51 AM

Rank: Divine Rapscallion

Joined: 8/15/2010
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Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
obscura wrote:
'Yin/yang', not 'ying/yang.'

'A whole other', not 'a whole nother.'

'As long as', not 'so long as.'

'Let it be', not 'leave it be.' Just like the Beatles song suggests.

Excetera...

Oh no wait, I mean, et cetera.


To my knowledge, 'so long as' and 'leave it be' are both valid expressions.

Maggie Rascal
obscura
Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 5:37:17 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/10/2010
Posts: 143
Location: Zef Side
magnificent1rascal wrote:
To my knowledge, 'so long as' and 'leave it be' are both valid expressions.


'So long as' is not in SPEU hence I automatically assume its wrong. But I guess 'as...' can be used the same as 'for the duration' and 'so...' can be used as a conditional, like 'provided that'.

The verb of leave is 'to go away from', and let is to allow or permit. 'Leave it be' is a tautology, just like 'free gift' or 'the reason why'.

But I am no English professor and I guess its all in the context, so I stand corrected.

magnificent1rascal
Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 6:44:30 PM

Rank: Divine Rapscallion

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Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
obscura wrote:
magnificent1rascal wrote:
To my knowledge, 'so long as' and 'leave it be' are both valid expressions.


'So long as' is not in SPEU hence I automatically assume its wrong. But I guess 'as...' can be used the same as 'for the duration' and 'so...' can be used as a conditional, like 'provided that'.

The verb of leave is 'to go away from', and let is to allow or permit. 'Leave it be' is a tautology, just like 'free gift' or 'the reason why'.

But I am no English professor and I guess its all in the context, so I stand corrected.


Oh, I'm certainly no English professor; I was simply sharing what I thought was correct. Your reasoning against 'leave it be' is sound. 3601

Maggie Rascal
Guest
Posted: Sunday, October 24, 2010 4:08:27 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,409
He was going to try and have sex with her.

"try and" should be "try to"

He was going to try to have sex with her.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Monday, October 25, 2010 9:10:55 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,299
Location: Cakeland, United States
Throw out the gantlet or Run the gauntlet?



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
frenchtoastman
Posted: Sunday, December 05, 2010 2:24:44 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 7/13/2010
Posts: 29
Location: a state of bewilderment, United States
One blunder that I've seen quite a bit -- and ONLY in erotic fiction, for some inexplicable reason -- is the 2-in-1 word "eachother."

A ridiculous word that used to be quite common in smutty paperback novels (back when you could find such things in every local convenience store) is the adjective "cuntal." As in "Bill buried his face in her cuntal split." I'm guessing this one was coined by someone who didn't have sex very often, if ever.

A controversial confession: I've always hated the use of the word "cum" when taken to mean "orgasm," as in "When Bill ate Annie, tongue flicking at her clitoris like a velvet chainsaw, he made her cum so hard that she died." Some of you may scream in outrage, but the correct word in that context is "come," damn it.

(We need someone to rewrite the old Lenny Bruce song so it goes "Cum is a Substance, Come is a Verb.")
SweetPenny
Posted: Sunday, December 05, 2010 10:25:30 PM

Rank: Moderator

Joined: 6/15/2010
Posts: 1,271
Location: State of Confusion
frenchtoastman wrote:

A controversial confession: I've always hated the use of the word "cum" when taken to mean "orgasm," as in "When Bill ate Annie, tongue flicking at her clitoris like a velvet chainsaw, he made her cum so hard that she died." Some of you may scream in outrage, but the correct word in that context is "come," damn it.

(We need someone to rewrite the old Lenny Bruce song so it goes "Cum is a Substance, Come is a Verb.")


I don't know how accurate it is, but Wiktionary disagrees with you.

Noun

cum

1. (slang) Male semen.
2. (slang) Female ejaculatory discharge.

Synonyms

* (Semen): jizz, spunk

Verb

to cum (third-person singular simple present cums, present participle cumming, simple past came or cummed, past participle came, cum or cummed)

1. (slang) To have an orgasm; to ejaculate or to feel the sensation of an orgasm.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 6:10:06 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,299
Location: Cakeland, United States
I have heard play-by-play announcers broadcasting NFL football games, saying something like this, before:

"The Steelers really need to get untracked soon and get back to playing football, before the game gets out of hand."

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Untracked (indicates an informal meaning which is opposite that used above), however...untracked seems to me...to be synonymous with derailed.

The train needs to become untracked before it can proceed further. I don't think so.

I need a referee's opinion.



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
nicola
Posted: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:51:11 PM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,548
Location: The Orgasmatron
I think they meant to say "back on track" and it came out wrong Wmm icon_smile
Ziptie477
Posted: Tuesday, January 04, 2011 12:02:57 AM

Rank: Rookie Scribe

Joined: 7/6/2010
Posts: 6
Location: Zushi
I am surprised that no one mentioned the infamous animal, alot... instead of the correct use " a lot" ..
rxtales
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 11:20:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 11/28/2008
Posts: 2,589
Location: Newcastle, United Kingdom
I always get the expression "play it by ear" wrong and say "play it by year"

myself
Posted: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 12:25:29 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 3/17/2010
Posts: 966
Location: .showyourdick.org/
rxtales wrote:
I always get the expression "play it by ear" wrong and say "play it by year"



I think you're related somehow : )

alright/all right- cool

Torture the data long enough and they will confess to anything.
Sunlover
Posted: Sunday, January 23, 2011 8:55:41 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 1/22/2011
Posts: 11
Location: Las Vegas
I second the concept of the earlier post that we should distinguish between the narrative and the dialog. The phrase being used incorrectly in dialog may be exactly what the writer intends in order to show us more about the character in the story. Think of Italian mafioso dialog in the Godfather movies as just one of many examples.
GirlyWorld
Posted: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 8:43:48 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 7/27/2010
Posts: 112
Location: Paris
Irregardless of other people's opinions, I apprecified all the examples d'oh!

I've never heard anyone use the second one, except in a comedy sketch about "Bushisms". Still, I think it would be great to hear it in real life, even if only once.
Eutopia
Posted: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 6:32:05 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 3/30/2010
Posts: 31
Same Difference does not mean 'same thing'. Same difference refers to two subject matters which are not equal yet share similar values.

For instance: Apples & Oranges. Both are fruits, but are not equal.

Bob: I love Apples.
John: Don't you mean Oranges?
Bob: Same Difference


>:I Going to go rub this in my mothers face now, it has always annoyed me the way she says "same difference" instead of "same thing."
_mal_
Posted: Thursday, March 03, 2011 7:24:08 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 11/27/2010
Posts: 191
Location: Somewhere, United States
Not really a phrase, but still something that irks me...

"that that"

Technically, it's correct in English (I suppose... I don't know of anything that says it's incorrect) but it always makes my mind stumble over the sentence (and mouth, if I read aloud). I usually have to backtrack and reread the sentence to make sure it's correct or that the person hasn't made a typo or some other grammar error.

It happens to me very occasionally and I always rewrite the sentence. I wish others would do the same.

It's a weird thing. We find ourselves writing it but logically we know a "that that" isn't necessary -- we can say the same thing using one "that" or none at all. I say axe it.
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