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Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:04:22 AM

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During committee testimony this week in Austin, a Texas senator interrupted a Spanish speaker and telling him he should "be speaking in English" during a committee hearing.

Antolin Aguirre of the Austin Immigrant Rights Coalition was testifying against Senate Bill 9 that would help crack down on illegal immigrants in Texas. Aguirre spoke through an interpreter even though he had been in the U.S. since 1988.

Two minutes into Antolin Aguirre’s testimony, Sen. Chris Harris, a Republican from Arlington, interrupted asking Aguirre’s interrupter, "Did I understand him correctly that he has been here since 1988?" Harris asked. "Why aren’t you speaking in English then?"


Do you think he he was right for this exchange or is it racist??

Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:05:16 AM

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What are you talking about?
Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:06:47 AM

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had to edit the what i posted

Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:08:49 AM

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From Drudge this is the rest of the article

Through his interpreter, Aguirre said Spanish is his "first language and since it is his first time giving testimony he would rather do it in Spanish."

"It is insulting to us," Sen. Harris fired back. "It is very insulting. And if he knows English, he needs to be speaking in English."

The fiery exchange happened on Monday during a Senate Transportation and Homeland Security Committee hearing. Law makers were hearing testimony on the purposed Senate Bill 9 – The so-called sanctuary cities bill. The bill would allow local law enforcement officials to check a suspect’s immigration status.

Supporters of Senate Bill 9 have said it would help crack down on illegal immigrants. Opponents argue that it will do little to help border security and that it’s instead based on racism.

Despite the blow-up The Texas Senate passed the bill Wednesday. It now goes to the House with a vote expected in the next few days.

Read more: #ixzz1PXgPhvzA
LadyX
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:19:22 AM

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It's political theater. I don't know if Chris Harris is really a bigot or not, but he knew that it would score major points with his bigoted constituents if he asked that question when given the opportunity. As we all know, it drives some people absolutely nuts that some immigrants can spend decades in the US without feeling comfortable (or choosing) to speak English, and for some reason, those people tend to be Republican, and tend to drive a really hard line when it comes to issues of immigration.

Make no mistake, this movement toward tougher immigration laws is tinged with more than a little racism. Sure, there are many out there who will disagree with that, and it's true that not every individual who wants to see the border tightened and the illegals thrown out is racist, but we're kidding ourselves if we allow ourselves to believe that it's simply about law and order (and not the way our prejudices view law and order through a racial lens).

latinfoxy
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 9:29:16 AM

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With this comment i am about to make i may angry my fellow Latins over here.... that said i do believe that if you are choosing to live in another country you should learn the language that is speak in that country, im not saying loose your culture or change yourself to fit that country society but you shouldnt expect that country to change for you, so yes if you want to live there you should speak their language.

About this particular case both of them where doing it for shock value in my opinion, im pretty sure Aguirre knows English very well and im sure Harris was just being a dick. To be honest i think Aguirre did it wrong, he knew he was speaking to a bunch of Republicans that hates imigrants, so he should speak perfect English to them and proof to them that he is a very well educated and prepared person and prove them wrong that every imigrant is just a bordom to US society and they are only there to have 20 kids and make the goverment pay for it.

Im totally against this law i do think its racist and is giving permision to be judgmental against looks.
Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 11:28:40 AM

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i live in a spanish speaking state (new mexico) and it doesnt bother me to hear spanish or see spanish signs at the Home Depot. My daughter will go to a spanish immersion school when shes 5, which offers an elective of Arabic in 4th grade, which she will also take. i think we should all be multi lingual if at all possible.

that said...i do think if you are going to live in another country you should endeavor to learn the language...its fun and you wont look like and idiot trying to order dinner :)
Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 1:02:47 PM

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LittleMissBitch wrote:

that said...i do think if you are going to live in another country you should endeavor to learn the language...its fun and you wont look like and idiot trying to order dinner :)


Or ask where the bathroom is. Remember Steve Martin? "Casa de pee pee"
Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 1:08:04 PM

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chefkathleen wrote:
LittleMissBitch wrote:

that said...i do think if you are going to live in another country you should endeavor to learn the language...its fun and you wont look like and idiot trying to order dinner :)


Or ask where the bathroom is. Remember Steve Martin? "Casa de pee pee"



hahahaaa yesss! was that Three Amigos???
lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 1:09:43 PM

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LittleMissBitch wrote:
chefkathleen wrote:
LittleMissBitch wrote:

that said...i do think if you are going to live in another country you should endeavor to learn the language...its fun and you wont look like and idiot trying to order dinner :)


Or ask where the bathroom is. Remember Steve Martin? "Casa de pee pee"



hahahaaa yesss! was that Three Amigos???


There are a plethora of good lines in Three Amigos!





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
MrNudiePants
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 5:57:20 PM

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lafayettemister wrote:
LittleMissBitch wrote:
chefkathleen wrote:
LittleMissBitch wrote:

that said...i do think if you are going to live in another country you should endeavor to learn the language...its fun and you wont look like and idiot trying to order dinner :)


Or ask where the bathroom is. Remember Steve Martin? "Casa de pee pee"



hahahaaa yesss! was that Three Amigos???


There are a plethora of good lines in Three Amigos!


"How can you, Jose, tell me, El Guapo, that I have a plethora, when indeed you do not even know what a plethora is...?"


That said...

I think if a person intends to make a foreign country his permanent home, he should learn the language as promptly, and use it when protocol calls for it. Name one country other then Great Britain where I could go as an English-speaking person, and not have to learn the native language to get along. Can you imagine moving to France and never learning French? Or Mexico, and Spanish? Sure, I could limp along using only English, but it wouldn't be right to expect the people there to make their business or government offices multi-lingual just to suit my lack.

I agree that this whole affair was merely political grandstanding, and think that this was one occasion where "playing politics" should take a back seat to getting business done.

Rembacher
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 7:18:07 PM

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MrNudiePants wrote:
That said...

I think if a person intends to make a foreign country his permanent home, he should learn the language as promptly, and use it when protocol calls for it. Name one country other then Great Britain where I could go as an English-speaking person, and not have to learn the native language to get along. Can you imagine moving to France and never learning French? Or Mexico, and Spanish? Sure, I could limp along using only English, but it wouldn't be right to expect the people there to make their business or government offices multi-lingual just to suit my lack.


It was my understanding that this man was using an interpreter, so I don't see how the comment of "it wouldn't be right to expect the people there to make their business or government offices multi-lingual just to suit my lack" applies. And secondly, the US has no official language because it could never be decided which language that should be, so why does anyone have to learn any particular language? People are given the freedom to do business in whatever language they choose.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 7:30:00 PM

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If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
MrNudiePants
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:14:19 PM

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Jebru wrote:
MrNudiePants wrote:
That said...

I think if a person intends to make a foreign country his permanent home, he should learn the language as promptly, and use it when protocol calls for it. Name one country other then Great Britain where I could go as an English-speaking person, and not have to learn the native language to get along. Can you imagine moving to France and never learning French? Or Mexico, and Spanish? Sure, I could limp along using only English, but it wouldn't be right to expect the people there to make their business or government offices multi-lingual just to suit my lack.


It was my understanding that this man was using an interpreter, so I don't see how the comment of "it wouldn't be right to expect the people there to make their business or government offices multi-lingual just to suit my lack" applies. And secondly, the US has no official language because it could never be decided which language that should be, so why does anyone have to learn any particular language? People are given the freedom to do business in whatever language they choose.


I was speaking in generalities, but okay. I'll play. Imagine appearing before a French governing body with the intent of telling them how to handle their official business, and not deigning to speak French, but requiring the aid of an interpreter to do so. They'd escort you out of the building. As far as an "official language", it's commonly understood that the language we use in official government affairs is English. Our laws are written in English. Our legal reference books are written in English. It may not be "official", but if you want to study law, or medicine, or engineering, or any other advanced field you had better be able to speak English. If you want to go into politics, it may help to be multi-lingual, but one of those languages had better be English. Immigrants to this country who refuse to learn English generally tend to stay confined to local "Chinatown" type areas, while their children go out into the country and become more prosperous than their non-English-speaking parents, and their grandchildren (in many cases) can't even be bothered to learn their mother tongue..

Sure, they can have the freedom to speak whatever language they want. They don't HAVE to learn English if they don't want to. But they'll be forever disadvantaged if they choose not to.

akwildman
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 8:23:08 PM

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When in Türkiye, I did not have to press 1 for Türkish. When in Germany, I did not have to press 1 for Deutsch, either. So, just why in the h-e-double toothpicks do I have to press 1 for English in the good ole US of A??? It just aint right.

I honestly wish the idiots in DC would pass a resolution stating that English IS the official language of the United States! As I said above, I hate having to press 1 for English in the US! The fact that California has the drivers license test in what 10-15 different languages is just too much! All the traffic signs are in English, and the test should be too! If I wanted to order a meal in Turkiye or Germany, I learned enough of the local language to be able to. Just my opinion!

*****Sleep peacefully tonight, your Air Force is protecting you!*****
cyrwr3gmail
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 9:01:11 PM

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There's no official languages in the US, speak and learn whatever you like if you feel that is just appropriate and sufficient ! :)
tomlando
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 9:03:09 PM

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I really wonder what will happen, maybe in 30 or 40 years from now, when the hispanic heritage will be the majority of the population. Will Spanish then be the official language?
I feel that Mr Aguirre was obviously addressing spanish voters rather than the Senate. The free advertising ploy, though hardly unprecendented, appears to have worked well for him.
Rembacher
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 9:51:48 PM

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Can anyone tell me why Antolin Aguirre was testifying? I've tried to find it, but all I see is a bunch of comments on Senator Chris Harris's comments, no actual back story to how the situation came about. From what I read, Mr. Aguirre was testifying before the Senate for the first time, and chose to do so through an interpreter because he was more comfortable in Spanish. Surveys have found that people fear public speaking more than death. So, for someone making an important presentation before a government body, I can certainly understand why Mr. Aguirre would want to make sure he said everything he meant to say, and also appeared confident and knowledgeable, rather than nervous.

I'm not sure that he was telling them what to do, rather than voicing his opinion of a government bill, something I believe he is constitutionally permitted to do. I'll admit to not knowing a whole lot about how other countries handle seeking outside advice, so I can't comment on France, but I do know that when it comes to international diplomacy and conducting business between two countries, the use of an interpreter is not seen as a sign of disrespect, rather a necessary tool to ensure that information is not lost because of a language barrier.
Guest
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 10:08:40 PM

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tomlando wrote:
I really wonder what will happen, maybe in 30 or 40 years from now, when the hispanic heritage will be the majority of the population. Will Spanish then be the official language?
I feel that Mr Aguirre was obviously addressing spanish voters rather than the Senate. The free advertising ploy, though hardly unprecendented, appears to have worked well for him.


well im not sure why spanish would become official when english isnt now...and ive seen lots of european advertising where they were having to select a language on a machine or whatever and being multi lingual and multi literate is very common in europe yeah?
dannydeboy
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 10:13:49 PM

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questo è fondamentalmente il razzismo e non un punto politico. ora sono in inglese ma mi parlano molte lingue e credo che il senatore è ancora rasist.
dannydeboy
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 10:14:37 PM

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now for those not blessed with italian.

this is basically racism and not a political point. now i'm english but i speak many languages and i think the senator is still rasist.
Juicyme
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 12:11:13 AM

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Going back to the original question first, I think that Aguirre was right. Speaking before the senate you should use which ever language you're most comfortable with. For the Senator to interrupt him, was rude any way you look at it. Just rude. Most of us it has taken us the majority of our lives to learn English. We were taught at home, at school and in college. That takes most people 24 years of their to become fluent enough in the English language to even consider appearing before the senate (not to mention the time it takes to get rehearsed and learn political terms and jargon).

Now on to the bigger question, should everyone in the US know how to speak English. In an ideal world everyone would learn English, however, as previously pointed out the US does not have an official language, it's just assumed to be English. Furthermore, who is going to pay to teach immigrants or nonnative speakers English???? It cost money that many adults don't have so they use their children or friends as their translator. Also just because you live in America doesn't mean that you will pick up the English language fluently. The reason I say this is because there are illiterate people in America who get by just fine without reading.

Also what opportunities does a non English speaker miss out on that English speakers have? And do you take every opportunity that's presented to you in life? People have been communicating for years without using the same language.
rxtales
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 1:29:22 PM

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I find it funny that so many Americans get upset about people not learning to speak English while they are living in the US. I have been to countries which are popular places for US expats to live, and they aren´t able to speak the language.

I live in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. This town relies very heavily on American tourists, so a lot of the mexicans here speak English. It´s still Mexico though, and most people speak Spanish. There are a lot of American expats that live here, and the majority don´t speak a word of Spanish. I know several Americans who have been here 20+ years and can´t speak simple Spanish.
MrNudiePants
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 1:53:20 PM

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Jebru wrote:
Can anyone tell me why Antolin Aguirre was testifying? I've tried to find it, but all I see is a bunch of comments on Senator Chris Harris's comments, no actual back story to how the situation came about. From what I read, Mr. Aguirre was testifying before the Senate for the first time, and chose to do so through an interpreter because he was more comfortable in Spanish. Surveys have found that people fear public speaking more than death. So, for someone making an important presentation before a government body, I can certainly understand why Mr. Aguirre would want to make sure he said everything he meant to say, and also appeared confident and knowledgeable, rather than nervous.

I'm not sure that he was telling them what to do, rather than voicing his opinion of a government bill, something I believe he is constitutionally permitted to do. I'll admit to not knowing a whole lot about how other countries handle seeking outside advice, so I can't comment on France, but I do know that when it comes to international diplomacy and conducting business between two countries, the use of an interpreter is not seen as a sign of disrespect, rather a necessary tool to ensure that information is not lost because of a language barrier.


The issue is this: In Texas border towns, they have a big problem with illegal immigrants from Mexico. These Mexicans cross the border and cause crimes, deal drugs, assault people, and generally act like hoodlums. The Texas government wants to pass a law giving the police there authority to stop anyone they want to, and ask for identification. If they find someone that's an illegal immigrant, that person will be taken into custody. Mexican immigrants there, both legal and illegal, don't like this law because they feel it gives free rein to the police to harass anyone with brown skin - which likely is what will happen.

I also live in an area with illegal immigration problems. I personally don't have a problem with police asking someone for identification, depending on how it's handled. If the policeman is polite and respectful, takes the ID and does his inquiries in a professional fashion, then I think it's fine. If the policeman acts like a thug, handcuffs his "suspects", and generally terrorizes them until the ID check is complete, than that thug has no business being a cop.

In this incident, the Texan Senate committee was hearing testimony from the public on whether or not they (the citizens) felt that this bill was a good idea or bad. Evidently, when the Senator heard that Mr. Aguirre had been a resident of Texas since 1988, he felt that Mr. Aguirre should have had enough time to learn English, and should have addressed the Committee in English. He felt that by doing so in Spanish, Mr. Aguirre was insulting the Committee, and voiced his displeasure.

This has nothing to do with "international diplomacy" or "conducting business between two countries." It's strictly a Texan affair, conducted in Texas, by Texan politicians and Texan residents.

Let me redefine my question for you: Suppose I move to France, and live there for twenty-three years. Suppose I refuse to learn enough French to make conversation possible. Suppose I go to a meeting of a French government body, where they're discussing the passing of a French law. Suppose I refuse to speak to that council in French, but instead try to instruct them on why that law is a bad law through an interpreter. Do you think they'll give me even a moment's consideration? Of course not.

Whether Mr. Aguirre meant to be insulting or not is known only to Mr. Aguirre. It's obvious that the Texan Senator thought he did.

MrNudiePants
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 1:55:33 PM

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rxtales wrote:
I find it funny that so many Americans get upset about people not learning to speak English while they are living in the US. I have been to countries which are popular places for US expats to live, and they aren´t able to speak the language.

I live in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. This town relies very heavily on American tourists, so a lot of the mexicans here speak English. It´s still Mexico though, and most people speak Spanish. There are a lot of American expats that live here, and the majority don´t speak a word of Spanish. I know several Americans who have been here 20+ years and can´t speak simple Spanish.


If I was to move to Mexico and become a permanent resident there, I'd make it my business to learn the language. I wouldn't even consider otherwise. The thought just doesn't make sense to me. I apply the same moral guidelines to someone that moves to America and becomes a permanent resident. They should make their best attempt at learning English, even if they never use it at home or among friends. Just because.

rxtales
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 2:20:20 PM

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MrNudiePants wrote:
rxtales wrote:
I find it funny that so many Americans get upset about people not learning to speak English while they are living in the US. I have been to countries which are popular places for US expats to live, and they aren´t able to speak the language.

I live in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. This town relies very heavily on American tourists, so a lot of the mexicans here speak English. It´s still Mexico though, and most people speak Spanish. There are a lot of American expats that live here, and the majority don´t speak a word of Spanish. I know several Americans who have been here 20+ years and can´t speak simple Spanish.


If I was to move to Mexico and become a permanent resident there, I'd make it my business to learn the language. I wouldn't even consider otherwise. The thought just doesn't make sense to me. I apply the same moral guidelines to someone that moves to America and becomes a permanent resident. They should make their best attempt at learning English, even if they never use it at home or among friends. Just because.


I agree. Some attempt should be made. Some people just aren´t very good languages. I can pick them up pretty quickly, but I am sure if I moved to Thailand or China or some place I would struggle for a while.

This is a weird place though. I also find a lot of the expats here don´t like Mexican. A lot of the American landlords here will only rent to other foreigners and won´t let you have Mexicans over. Okay, maybe a lot is a bit of an exaggeration. But still, I don´t understand why they would move to Mexico...

I recently did some work with the Gringo Gazette, a newspaper for english speakers here. The editor told me she wouldn´t print anything about events that Mexicans were involved in because the gringos then wouldn´t like it.

Sorry, was on a bit of a tangent there
Rembacher
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 4:57:30 PM

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MrNudiePants wrote:
Let me redefine my question for you: Suppose I move to France, and live there for twenty-three years. Suppose I refuse to learn enough French to make conversation possible. Suppose I go to a meeting of a French government body, where they're discussing the passing of a French law. Suppose I refuse to speak to that council in French, but instead try to instruct them on why that law is a bad law through an interpreter. Do you think they'll give me even a moment's consideration? Of course not.

Whether Mr. Aguirre meant to be insulting or not is known only to Mr. Aguirre. It's obvious that the Texan Senator thought he did.


Thanks for the info, I wasn't sure whether he was testifying in an open forum, or was invited to speak specifically because of his work with immigrants. I still have two issues with your example aside from the obvious difference that France actually has an official language, where the USA does not. 1) I do not believe that France would ignore a speaker specifically because he or she chose to use an interpreter to address them, regardless of how long the speaker had been in the country. 2) Since when was the standard for US actions what France does? What happened to all those freedoms you talk about in other threads? Isn't American the land of freedom, where your rights are protected, including the right to democratic representation? Or does that only apply to white, English-speaking people?
MrNudiePants
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 9:24:29 PM

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Jebru wrote:
MrNudiePants wrote:
Let me redefine my question for you: Suppose I move to France, and live there for twenty-three years. Suppose I refuse to learn enough French to make conversation possible. Suppose I go to a meeting of a French government body, where they're discussing the passing of a French law. Suppose I refuse to speak to that council in French, but instead try to instruct them on why that law is a bad law through an interpreter. Do you think they'll give me even a moment's consideration? Of course not.

Whether Mr. Aguirre meant to be insulting or not is known only to Mr. Aguirre. It's obvious that the Texan Senator thought he did.


Thanks for the info, I wasn't sure whether he was testifying in an open forum, or was invited to speak specifically because of his work with immigrants. I still have two issues with your example aside from the obvious difference that France actually has an official language, where the USA does not. 1) I do not believe that France would ignore a speaker specifically because he or she chose to use an interpreter to address them, regardless of how long the speaker had been in the country. 2) Since when was the standard for US actions what France does? What happened to all those freedoms you talk about in other threads? Isn't American the land of freedom, where your rights are protected, including the right to democratic representation? Or does that only apply to white, English-speaking people?


Don't get me wrong - I would oppose forcing him to learn English. If he wants to limit his usefulness in this country, then that's his choice. But in my opinion, when addressing a matter of law that's been written in English, and when addressing a body of governing Senators that speak English, it would be polite to do so in English. Even if you're English isn't perfect, at least it would make your passion and convictions clear. I think doing so in Spanish was rude, and at least one of the Senators agrees with me.

Rembacher
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 10:47:00 PM

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MrNudiePants wrote:
Jebru wrote:
MrNudiePants wrote:
Let me redefine my question for you: Suppose I move to France, and live there for twenty-three years. Suppose I refuse to learn enough French to make conversation possible. Suppose I go to a meeting of a French government body, where they're discussing the passing of a French law. Suppose I refuse to speak to that council in French, but instead try to instruct them on why that law is a bad law through an interpreter. Do you think they'll give me even a moment's consideration? Of course not.

Whether Mr. Aguirre meant to be insulting or not is known only to Mr. Aguirre. It's obvious that the Texan Senator thought he did.


Thanks for the info, I wasn't sure whether he was testifying in an open forum, or was invited to speak specifically because of his work with immigrants. I still have two issues with your example aside from the obvious difference that France actually has an official language, where the USA does not. 1) I do not believe that France would ignore a speaker specifically because he or she chose to use an interpreter to address them, regardless of how long the speaker had been in the country. 2) Since when was the standard for US actions what France does? What happened to all those freedoms you talk about in other threads? Isn't American the land of freedom, where your rights are protected, including the right to democratic representation? Or does that only apply to white, English-speaking people?


Don't get me wrong - I would oppose forcing him to learn English. If he wants to limit his usefulness in this country, then that's his choice. But in my opinion, when addressing a matter of law that's been written in English, and when addressing a body of governing Senators that speak English, it would be polite to do so in English. Even if you're English isn't perfect, at least it would make your passion and convictions clear. I think doing so in Spanish was rude, and at least one of the Senators agrees with me.


And I'm still not getting how this is rude, when he was using an interpreter. He was still communicating the same meanings in the same tones he would have if he had used English, not Spanish. With Spanish however, he got to feel more comfortable, and confident with his speech.

I understand if he had been speaking Spanish without an interpreter how that would be rude, I have to deal with that often in my retail job, and at school. In both settings people I am around will have a conversation with me, then switch to a language I can't understand, talk for a bit, then switch back to English to resume talking to me. But that's not what we are talking about here. He had an interpreter, so the Senators were not at all in the dark about what was being said.
Magical_felix
Posted: Sunday, June 19, 2011 12:06:20 PM

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While English is not the official language of the United States it is the de facto language. Just like spanish isn't the official language of Mexico either. I would never move to a country with a language I didn't speak. Life is hard enough, couldn't imagine having such a hurdle.

What the senator did was probably meant to belittle the guy. I can't see any other reason for it. He may not be racist, just frustrated with people who move to a country and don't bother to assimilate properly. This is the immigrants fault but also the United State's fault. It's so damn easy for an illegal to come here and live for thirty plus years never knowing a word of English. If we really think that people coming over from Mexico and living and working here is such a problem, why don't we really try to make a secure border? Look at south Korea and that DMZ they built... Now that is one country that is serious about keeping the population of one country out of theirs.

But of course wether these immigrants speak English or not shouldn't matter to us. Especially if you're in agriculture, own a construction business, hotel business, restaurant business or stay at a hotel, eat at restaurants, buy produce and meat at the supermarket etc... Everyone benefits from them being here. Because of them things are cheaper for us. Employers get away with paying them less than an American worker and sometimes the immigrant does better work and is fearful of taking sick days or messing up in any way. Their children will learn English and like nudie said, their grandchildren will probably not know their native tongue. It will always be this way as long as we let them keep coming in. To belittle someone that is more than welcomed here is hypocritical by the senator. If they really wanted to get them out they could, but they won't because they know how important they are to our economy. So it's best to just shut the hell up about it and worry about other things instead of being all butt hurt that Juan and Jose down the street point at a #2 instead of saying number two in English when they go to MacDonalds. If it's such a huge problem get the military to conduct raids of every damn business in the USA and fine the hell out of any employer hiring illegal immigrants. But seriously do it. Not just half ass it so they never get rid of them. Didn't we round up the Japanese fairly well during WW2? why would this be any different?



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