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Charging By The Download Options · View
Guest
Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2008 9:05:29 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 472,793
NEW YORK (AP) -- Time Warner Cable will experiment with a new pricing structure for high-speed Internet access later this year, charging customers based on how much data they download, a company spokesman said Wednesday.

The company, the second-largest cable provider in the United States, will start a trial in Beaumont, Texas, in which it will sell new Internet customers tiered levels of service based on how much data they download per month, rather than the usual fixed-price packages with unlimited downloads.

Company spokesman Alex Dudley said the trial was aimed at improving the network performance by making it more costly for heavy users of large downloads. Dudley said that a small group of super-heavy users of downloads, around 5 percent of the customer base, can account for up to 50 percent of network capacity.

Dudley said he did not know what the pricing tiers would be nor the download limits. He said the heavy users were likely using the network to download large amounts of video, most likely in high definition.

It was not clear when exactly the trial would begin, but Dudley said it would likely be around the second quarter. The tiered pricing would only affect new customers in Beaumont, not existing ones.

Time Warner Cable is a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc., the world's largest media company.

nicola
Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2008 10:19:36 PM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 24,872
Location: Sydney, Australia
Probably not a great thing for the vast majority of users, especially those of us who are on day and night.

Teh interweb is doomed by the greedy fat cats sad1
Vermin28
Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2008 10:21:42 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 1/14/2008
Posts: 16
In Oz they have a similar set up already but what they do is sell you a high speed account based on say 40gB a month total browsing downloads everything and once you exceed 40gB your access drops to dial up speed for the rest of the month and resets to high speed after 31 days or a month have passed it works quite well
KnightOfPassion
Posted: Friday, January 18, 2008 2:36:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 3/2/2007
Posts: 48
I think all this crap won't last more than the next year or two. As our global data infrastructure improves, we're going to reach the point where information transfer will be - like phone calls now - effectively free. Of course, that won't stop people trying to make money out of it, but I think that within the next ten years we're going to achieve geek nirvana: constant connection to our online life, at speeds which exceed anything a normal person could use, for free.

Seriously, in 2018, if I'm not sitting by my pool streaming four channels of HD-video porn onto my laptop, there's going to be trouble!

And then, the revolution! ;)


Knight Of Passion: The Man, The Legend, The Blog - and now, The Podcast!
Deadly
Posted: Friday, January 18, 2008 2:54:12 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 11/25/2007
Posts: 166
All the Australian ISPs do their broadband accounts on monthly download size and speed. You pay more for higher speed and more for high download limits. They range from 300MB per month at little more than dial up speed for a few bucks to unlimited T1s at a fortune. Most people use 20GB, 40GB, or 60GB downloads at speeds of 256 or 512.

But then we still have phone calls based on distance using the same old formulas as when they were all operator connected.Boo hoo!
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