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Buz
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 1:46:10 PM

Rank: The Linebacker

Joined: 3/2/2011
Posts: 5,819
Location: Atlanta, United States
Thanks to CurlyGurly I had a question answered on The Forum that really helps me!!!! Thanks!

I have dyslexia which makes spelling correctly a constant challenge. I often do not recognize the spelling error no matter what, though I can spell the word orally correct every time. Blue type is always a challenge, especially light blue. Brown works great for me. Unfortunately blue is much more popular for use on the internet and web design.

Thank goodness my mother is a school teacher and knew how to help me adjust in school. I graduated college and am actually taking post graduate classes (mostly one at a time.)

I have no doubt there are other Lush members that have dyslexia.

But just to let everyone know we dyslexics actually have a very prestigious membership club. Just because we have difficulty spelling and so forth we are certainly not stupid.

Here is a list of famous dyslexics present and past:

Steve Jobs, Pablo Picasso, John Lennon, Tom Cruise, Orlando Bloom, Walt Disney, Cher, Thomas Edison, Babe Ruth, Whoopi Goldberg, Leonardo da Vinci, Steven Spielberg, General George Patton, Muhammed Ali, Thomas Jefferson, John F. Kennedy, Henry Ford, Sir Winston Churchill and Alexander Graham Bell.

I just corrected more than a dozen mistakes (that I eventually caught) before I posted this. If you see any more let me know and I will go back and edit this post. In fact if you ever see any typo in one of my post I would really appreciate you contacting me so I can go back and correct it.

Thanks,
Buz

Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:12:08 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,383
You're welcome, Buz. As I mentioned, I thought "Quick Reply" was the only way to post on the forums for a long time. It took forever before I actually noticed the "Post Reply" button, so you're not the only one missing things. Couldn't figure out how people were changing fonts and posting videos. Embarassed

Thanks for giving the information about dyslexia and some of the things you have to struggle with. I have never had a problem reading your posts. They are usually very well put together.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:18:24 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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i had no idea that dyslexics had colors that made it easier to read and write in that is so fascinating. i have been in class with some and the teachers were always quietly accommodating so as not to embarrass the student but good for you for putting yourself out there and for being such an accomplished writer. you go man!
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:25:36 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,383

I think spelling errors are never a big deal, as the eye naturally will correct it so that the brain understands what is being conveyed.

I think in many of the posts on here, it's the punctuation and grammar that are something else entirely.

Buz ..... you write so well, that one would never know the struggles you have had.

Big Hugs
magnificent1rascal
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:27:48 PM

Rank: Divine Rapscallion

Joined: 8/15/2010
Posts: 3,018
Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
Buz, I saw your post in the other forum and I wanted to say a big THANK YOU for the incredible effort you put forth to make your messages clean and tidy. I have never had any trouble reading any of your posts.

I realize what a challenge dyslexia can pose. The fact that I had no inkling until today that you suffer from it, even after reading so many of your posts, says a lot about you and your perseverance. You are a great example and role model.


Maggie Rascal
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:35:08 PM

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I do not have dyslexia buz and yet i still have botched up posts so like mag said cudos to you for making it impossible to tell you suffered until we were told. Sorry the brown's not very brown but i do hope it helps
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:51:02 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,383
Hey Buz, I am in agreement, I wouldn't have known either.

I agree with what Yahtzee said - I know that I often type my words incorrectly teh instead of the, that sort of thing - my fingers just do it and people will automatically correct that.

It's the long, run-on sentences and lack of grammar that seem to be a problem for most...

Keep up the good work!
Mistress_of_words
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 4:02:03 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/14/2011
Posts: 591
Location: At my keyboard, writing stories for you
Hey Buz, good on you for overcoming. Some people would use dyslexia as an excuse not to make an effort but I would have had no idea you had trouble. If you ever need someone to proof read your stories or anything, let me know.

I agree that in most cases spelling errors aren't a big issue, the meaning is usually still obvious. I struggle with a lack of or incorrect punctuation in posts I read sometimes because the punctuation changes the meaning of the sentence. Big blocks of text with no paragraph breaks are also hard to read, because it all just blurs together.

I don't know a lot about dyslexia. With reading different colours, do the colours that are difficult or helpful vary from person to person?

Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 4:39:13 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,383
Buzz, it's nice to meet a fellow sufferer, seems that Dyslexia and creatvity can go hand in hand sometimes, I tried the colour glasses when younger and they weren't for me. Seemed it was a case of perciverance that got me over the line to a decent level of ability with grammer and spelling.

It still tricks me every once in a while, walked into a hospital lift and read the "Smoking Not Permited" sign as "Smoking Permited", was thinking what kind of hospital was I in while rereading and then having a laugh at myself.

That to me seems to be the key, being able to take it slow reread and try not to rush things. Not always possible but the best way, well for me anyway.

So I believe anyone with Dyslexia can do anything they want, I'm researching and starting to write a book right now, feel sorry for the editor eventually, but know I can do it.

Thanks again for starting this thing off, there are more people out there with learning difficulties than most people realise, modern technology makes it alot easier to cover it up, but there is nothing as helpful as a good old fashion dictionary.
rxtales
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 4:52:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 11/28/2008
Posts: 2,589
Location: Newcastle, United Kingdom
I like to think I put the sexy in dyslexia.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 5:45:00 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,383
I heard Cher in an interview one time say that she used an eye patch. I can't remember if it's supposed to cover the dominate eye or not. Of course she liked wearing it saying that it was roguish and cool.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 7:50:12 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,383
I too am of the dyslexic nation and also am color blind.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 8:02:20 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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lone wolf i have a serious question for you: Does being colorblind make your dyslexia any worse? it seems like from what buz has told me that it would but idk does it? man that really sucks good for you for all for being so strong, for writing such great material and for trying to live normal lives sorry if this question is to prying.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 8:14:51 PM

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bigguns wrote:
lone wolf i have a serious question for you: Does being colorblind make your dyslexia any worse? it seems like from what buz has told me that it would but idk does it? man that really sucks good for you for all for being so strong, for writing such great material and for trying to live normal lives sorry if this question is to prying.


Before I write or type maybe the case. I do try to proof read before I turn in or post. Now my big issue being color blind is when there is a car or truck that has lights all over or when it rains at night I have a hard time of focus. If that makes any sense.
Simply_Susan
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 9:45:43 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 7/9/2011
Posts: 254
Location: Somewhere out here...send a map I\'m lost again.
Thank you Buz. I too have dyselxia. The years before finally finding out what was going on, I was labeled with the "doesn't try hard enough"..."not as smart"..blah blah blah. I also spend time re-reading posts before I post them, just to assure myself at this point.
As for the colorblind question, there are people who actually take in information better when the color is something besides black and white. My daughter is also dyselxic (its inherited folks) and we have gone though several different avenue to help her, its never allowed as an excuse to simply not do something. We just find a new way around it.

Hell...I couldn't tell left from right without long serious thought, until I got my first wrist tattoo. Only my mom (who also lived with dyslexia) was the only one who caught onto why I did it.

I was the kid next door's imaginary friend.
Jingle
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 1:48:46 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 164
Location: In my favourite blankey.
I think dyslexia takes a unique form for each person, right? Or it seems that way, at any rate.


Numbers are my issue. In math class I would open my book and literally be asleep on it in 2 minutes. I was 18 and going through adult education when a teacher (not even the school's math teacher, oddly enough) pulled me aside, took a look at how I work, and taught me how to do algebra with coloured pencils. In five minutes she fixed what years of schooling and teachers could not figure out. By writing out each step and using colours to highlight what particular part I was working on, the confusion stopped.


I think the best thing that can happen to dyslexia is for more and more people to be open about it. It's something that doesn't advance until we have a look at the problem in a new way. The math teachers I had been dealing with were all looking at my problem in the traditional way, and I was going nowhere. This other teacher took a moment to think outside the box and changed my life with what she discovered.

As for using dyslexia as an excuse... Sometimes people use it as an explanation, and that gets misunderstood as using it for an excuse. If someone points out a mistake of mine, I'll apologise, maybe make a joke about being dyslexic, and it's not because I'm using it as an excuse to get away from trying harder. It's letting people know what's going on because I don't want to be seen as an idiot; I want them to understand there's a valid reason behind the mistakes that has nothing to do with my intelligence or my ambition.

It's actually been my experience that dyslexic people are incredibly smart. Just look at the people in this thread! ;)

rxtales
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 4:27:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 11/28/2008
Posts: 2,589
Location: Newcastle, United Kingdom
Jingle wrote:
I think dyslexia takes a unique form for each person, right? Or it seems that way, at any rate.



Yeah it does. For me, it really only effects me when I read out loud. When I read I don´t follow the words in the same way most people do, my eyes are all over the page. When I read to myself my brain puts it all together rathar slowly, but when it comes to reading it out loud it can´t do it quick enough. So when I am reading to someone it really sounds like I don´t know how to read at all.

It effects my brother´s short term memory (almost non-existent) and his speech as well as mixing up words and numbers and such.
Buz
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 5:42:46 AM

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Joined: 3/2/2011
Posts: 5,819
Location: Atlanta, United States
I don't know if being color blind could make dyslexia worse. I just have a much more difficult time deciphering type that is printed in blue, made worse on a monitor or anything that has light behind it.

I am sure being color blind would create other problems such as reading traffic signals. I would think that the person would then learn which light to go or stop on by its vertical order on the light.


overmykneenow
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 6:08:59 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/8/2010
Posts: 1,022
Location: United Kingdom
As part of web accessibility, designers are meant to allow users to be able to change colours of fonts and backgrounds in their browsers specifically to help those with dyslexia and related conditions

Buz, if you use Firefox it's certainly worth using the options to control screen colours to whatever you find easiest to read: Tools>Options>Content>Colours - be sure to uncheck the box that allows sites to choose their own colours

Hope that helps



Warning: The opinions above are those of an anonymous individual on the internet. They are opinions, unless they're facts. They may be ill-informed, out of touch with reality or just plain stupid. They may contain traces of irony. If reading these opinions causes you to be become outraged or you start displaying the symptoms of outrage, stop reading them immediately. If symptoms persist, consult a psychiatrist.

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Dudealicious
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 7:09:35 AM

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Joined: 11/12/2010
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Location: The center of the universe, Canada
Buz, much like many have said in this thread if you wouldn't have pointed it out we would have never known. Your posts are to the point and very well written!

Words being spelled improperly we can all get around, but your punctuation is damn near perfect which makes your posts clear and concise. I have a hard enough time posting a response in here at times, now to know you have to edit and proof read everything a few times makes me respect you even more.

To all the dyslexics out there in Lush land and beyond clapping

The night that changed my life, a four part series of a married man lusting after his co-worker

Guest
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 8:44:51 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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Good for you in facing the challenge head on. I have only knowingly come across one dyslexic person and she always used to get her d and b mixed up. I am glad that people are finally coming to realise that this is a problem and not, as you said, because you are stupid.

I would also like to echo an earlier comment and say that if you need me to proof read any of your stories then I would be quite happy to. I did this for another Lush person the other day and really enjoyed it.

Now I have got to go and read your stories.

xx
Jingle
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 6:09:11 PM

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Location: In my favourite blankey.
Buz wrote:
I don't know if being color blind could make dyslexia worse. I just have a much more difficult time deciphering type that is printed in blue, made worse on a monitor or anything that has light behind it.

I am sure being color blind would create other problems such as reading traffic signals. I would think that the person would then learn which light to go or stop on by its vertical order on the light.


I know for me it would, lol. Colours help me pick out details, and it's loads of details that make my brain start skipping.

If seeing certain colours is hard, maybe being colourblind would help? Anxious

LusciousLola
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 6:26:19 PM

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Dyslexia is an extremely common condition, affecting 1 in 8 people, quite likely more than that. Many have it and don't know it. It manifests itself differently in each individual. Many people figure out little tricks that help them and for some eye therapy is the answer. Often times, people with dyslexia spell phonetically, which can be a good clue towards diagnosing.
Naughtygrl73
Posted: Saturday, October 15, 2011 6:54:06 AM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 5/21/2011
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Location: The Naughty Mansion, Australia
My two eldest boys are bright and intelligent children but they have encountered great difficulty in learning to read and write. Many a teachers comments has been " he is a bright child, he should be doing better if only he would try harder and concentrate more". I took them both to have their eyes tested only to be told that they had no visual problems but they need to concentrate and they would do alot better.

This was a great source of frustration for me as I had worked with my boys and you only had to watch them to see how hard they tried to read.
The final straw for me was when my youngest son came to me asking if fire fighters needed to read, when I asked him why he wanted to know this, he answered that he thought that if they didnt, then perhaps that was a job he could do. I was heart broken hearing that at the age of 7 he was already giving up and thinking that he would never be able to be what he wished. This lead me to research their problem and I finally found a place that could help my boys.

Upon testing they were both diagnosed with Scotopic sensitivity or Irlen Syndrome. This is a problem with the efficient processing of visual information not an optical problem. The most common symptoms include poor spelling, slow reading rate, inaccurate reading and the list goes on.

Listening to my boys describe what they saw when they looked at a page had me speachless that they could read at all, Where most people see a page of the individual written word, both my boys see an unbroken line of letters, the lines on the page move up and down and words fade or disappear completely sometimes even seeing a flashing or sparking of bright lights behind the words. These symptoms can be made worse by white paper with black words and fluorescent or bright lighting

It was such a relief to have an answer, and while they will always have this problem the solution was a simple as coloured lenses. Each person is different and the lenses range in colours from yellow, pink, red, geen, blue, brown and every shade in between.

Since they have been diagnosed my boys have improved to such an extent that my eldest is now in a program for gifted students and my younger son who had much more severe symptoms has gone from level 12 to level 21 in reading in the space of 6 months.
I will be having my younger 2 children tested once they have reached school age as it does run in families



ArtMan
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 1:28:41 PM

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In real life I work in a creative field where the percentage of dyslexic people is higher than most I bet. I have found that they tend to be very artistic/creative in some form and most I know have higher than average intelligence. They might work and develop things a little differently but give them their space and allow them to do things the way they need to and it is usually well worth it.

I have also been amazed at the high number of dyslexic musicians who can play music by ear and actually prefer not to read music.




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Guest
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:57:47 PM

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I actually did a research paper about Dyslexia, I ended up reading that sometimes if you write words down with a certain colored backround, then it can help them to see it better and easier.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, November 22, 2011 2:51:27 AM

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I also have dyselxia but it was recognised early in my school years.
I had great support from my family and teachers so I feel as if I have continued to improve throughout my life which makes me feel more confident about the condition.
Head
Posted: Tuesday, November 22, 2011 11:36:25 AM

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I know this might be a strange question to ask but, how do you know if you have dyslexia ? This is not a wind up, i am being totally serious. Is there a test or something you can take ?
the reason i am asking is, a few weeks ago i had a friend to sort out my cctv and computer in my shop, it took him about three days in total, while he was here working he noticed a lot of things about my behavior and exellent writing skills( my handwriting looks as though i am writing with 5 broken fingers, and sometimes i cannot even understand what i have written myself). He himself, his brother and Mother have dyslexia, and his brother also has, i cant honestly remember what he called it, but its when you cant concentrate and get side tracked easily and easily distracted.
Which he said is exactly what i do !!!! He asked if i had ever been tested for any of them, i replied no theres nothing wrong with me.
Having thought more about it, and he knowing a lot more than me about these things, makes me think, i cant spell, i cant count, i am havent got a clue without a calculator (great when you sell things for a living) , i miss letters out of words and sometimes whole words out of sentances, i have a very short attention span and my mind just wanders off, i will start one job then go on to start another 3 or 4, and then remember about the first, but the biggest problem i have is reading, i try to read a lot, but cant read fiction books, and where it takes most people 2 days to read a book it will take me at least 2 weeks, i'v always just put this down to being a slow reader ?
After reading these posts though, i dont think i have a problem with colours, unless i'v just adapted unknowingly.
So if anyione knows of a web site that has some sort of test, please can you let me know. Thanks
Guest
Posted: Saturday, November 26, 2011 2:11:04 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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Don't know where you are int he world but here in the Uk, kids that are thought to have dyslexia have a dyselxia test and assessment and then go on the see a psychologists if need be.
Don't know how it works if you are adult.
My dyslexia has improved a lot over the years but I found the biggest challenge was more to do with having the self confidence to write.
My spelling is really bad at times and sometimes I still 'block out' when writing but if you keep at it, you will improve.

Just don't let others drag you down if you have trouble reading or writing. A lot of people don't understand what it's like to have to really struggle with things which others seem to find really easy and their lack of awareness I find causes me to get stressed which in turn, makes the condition worse.
poizenivy
Posted: Friday, December 02, 2011 10:54:02 PM

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Location: In a suspended state of permanent horniness, Unite
I have dyslexia and ADHD... I also have my undergrad in English lit and a Masters in Education... I deal with the challenges daily but have come to embrace them as well.

Sex is not the answer. Sex is the question. "Yes" is the answer. ~Swami X

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