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Prison; revenge or rehabilitation? Options · View
elitfromnorth
Posted: Friday, April 27, 2012 7:48:41 AM

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So what should we have prisons for? Is it just to lock people up and make sure they're not a threat to society for as long as they are in there? Do we feel safer if a person is locked up for 15 years instead of 5? Has the prison system become a sort of "society's revenge" on the purpotrator where the sole reason is to make him/her suffer? I'm not talking about the mass murderers and those that deserve to be sentenced to life without parole. I'm thinking about those that go to jail for burgerly, drug related crimes, manslaughter and so forth. I saw an article on CNN that 60% of those that were sent to jail in the US gets sent back to jail on a later time. Is this a problem? Should something be done to prevent people from becoming repeat offender and going in and out of the gates as bell boy in a hotel? I'm not saying what's right and wrong, I'm just curious what you guys think dontknow

"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
Buz
Posted: Friday, April 27, 2012 8:20:54 AM

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Joined: 3/2/2011
Posts: 5,789
Location: Atlanta, United States
We do have a major prison problem in the USA. Far too many citizens are incarcerated and especially far too many black people. There is an injustice going on. The worst offense to this was started in 1971 when Richard Nixon declared the war on drugs. Every president and congress since then has continued this farce. Approximately the same number of blacks, whites, ad hispanics are arrested for possessing and selling drugs but especially blacks get sentenced to prison. Prison does not rehabilitate, instead it hardens people into criminals. Right now the USA has by far the highest percentage of its population imprisoned than any other modern industrialized nation. Drug offenders are the vast majority. Up until 1971 the USA did not rate any higher than other nations for incarceration.

We obviously have a real problem with our justice/prison system that needs to be changed.

I personally have already contacted my congressman and senators to complain and demand change. I would love to see more people demand that we get real change and rectify this injustice!

American citizens should check into becoming active in the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union).

Ruthie
Posted: Friday, April 27, 2012 11:14:49 AM

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Location: United States
I'm not sure that society has the right to punish people, or a responsibility to rehabilitate criminals. I'm also not sure that most criminals can be rehabilitated. We have way too many people in jail as a result of the war on drugs. We need to rethink our policy about drugs in general. Legalization would eliminate a lot of problems that are the direct result of criminalization of drugs such as gang wars, crimes to get money to buy drugs and also corruption caused by the bribing of politicians and law enforcement to turn a blind eye.

Many of the crimes that are committed are directly related to drugs, either the laws against drugs or crimes committed by addicts to buy drugs. If we spent as much money fighting addiction as we do drug trafficking, we might be able to eliminate a lot of reasons for that kind of crime. We should address the problems caused by drug abuse, but not by putting users in jail. That's a waste of time and money. We need to decide which crimes we won't tolerate as a society. Victim-less crimes such as drug possession and prostitution should be taken off the books. We don't have a responsibility to protect our citizens from themselves either.

Maybe a person should have one chance at rehabilitation. A first offender, or a person who commits a non-violent crime out of need or desperation, should be given a second chance, education, and whatever help they may need. Repeat offenders, on the other hand, are predators. All predators need to be removed from society, we don't need them. People who commit violent crimes against persons, rape or murder, for instance, should be permanently removed from society. Our only responsibility toward them is to protect ourselves from them.

Society in general needs to be improved. We all need to be less greedy and self involved. We need to care about each other more than we do. We need to think of society as a big family with responsibilities for each other, including the responsibility to protect ourselves from people who don't want to be part of society but just to steal from it. I don't see that happening though. We've had thousands of years to build a just society and haven't managed it yet. We need to work on changing what we can though.

Society does have a right to protect itself from predators, of course. Prison serves the purpose of segregating people from society who can't live within societies rules. Executions would serve the same purpose, of course, but that's a different debate.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2012 11:07:56 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,289
Location: Cakeland, United States
There is no rehabilitation provided to any inmates in any state or federal prison inside the United States. There may be 'classes' or education provided, but most of that is of an extremely menial level.

Removing the thousands of convicted drug users/abusers from the prison population would be a major start. So, I'm all for decriminalizing street and prescription drug use/abuse. Take the money which is now slotted for prison stays for those people and put it into drug rehab for all those caught dealing or using.

Prison should be for those who commit violent crimes against other humans. And some of those people can be rehabilitated, but you'd have to do extensive and much more psychological testing than is currently afforded and provided to weed those people out from the rest of the non-violent yet equally prosecuted and sentenced 'criminals'.

One of the major reasons for recidivism is when a person is released from prison, he or she is labeled for the rest of their natural life with a large scarlet letter. A felony conviction is pretty much the end of the line for that person, for them to ever 'get' a job again in their life...where they might make anything above minimum wage, if they can even get a job, period.

There's a lot of uneducated men and women in our US prisons. That's a prime reason they chose to do something criminal in the 1st place. They weren't smart enough or didn't think with enough long-range intellect about the possible ramifications of their actions. They were desperate enough to commit whatever crime they committed.

There are thousands of mentally ill people in prisons. These are people we as a society have failed. Plain and simple.

As it stands right now, all state prisons are just warehouses for those in society who are deemed to be ill fits for being around the rest of us.

The violent offenders... toss 'em away. I doubt seriously that there can be any rehabilitation for murderers, rapists, child molesters or arsonists. And even if they are 'rehabbed'...I could give a fuck less. I don't want those fuckers out wandering the general populace with the risk that they could ever repeat or escalate their horrendous previous antisocial behavior.

Burglars and thieves can be rehabbed. But they, like the drug users and dealers...require education and opportunity... after they've served their penalty phases of 1 to 10 years depending on the severity of their crimes committed against society.

The felony tag perpetuates the penalty forever for the great majority of those who have already 'served' the time penalty which society deemed necessary - to fit their crime.

Release a felon to society and 9 out of 10 times, you're going to see that person back in prison within 3 years. Where he or she can really learn how to become a much more vicious criminal - just to survive the jungle that is prison.



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
Guest
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2012 11:23:22 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 534,753
Some form of deterrent against criminal behavior helps a society not descend into anarchy, however, the incarceration of criminals rarely leads to rehabilitation. These days prisons are merely "zones" of continued criminal activities, particularly as:
a) gangs exist in prison and can control gang members outside the prison as well
b) prisoners are exposed to other criminals which leads to their "education" about future criminal activities when they are released
c) "For profit" private prison entrepeneurs use prison labor which allows additional criminal activity to occur (credit card theft, etc.)

The management of prisons is rife with abuse on many levels, whether through corrupt officials, guards, contraband, etc.

In far older times, criminal punishment had a very public face. Public humiliation and obvious identification of the criminal in society may seem brutal to our modern sensibilities, but did, in many cases, force a kind of rehabilitation or, at least, provide more protection to other members of that society. Symbolic mutilation, branding, and/or being forced to wear an identifying symbol or letter at all times assured that members of society knew what someone had done.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2012 2:57:11 PM

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If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
nazhinaz
Posted: Sunday, April 29, 2012 1:37:26 AM

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Joined: 1/16/2010
Posts: 293
Location: Longview, United States
The concept of imprisioning people evolved on retribution first.
But later it evolved further, taking it away from retribution to security and safety of society.
It may be of interest that societies did not have a prision, although retributive punishments were there in Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Now that societies have prisions based on social security, we need to look at the issue of druggists from that angle.
Driving is not restricted unless it becomes a concern for social security. Drunk Driving is not permissible under this concept, although drinking alcohal is allowed.
Druggists, if they are not a menace for social security maybe allowed; but the limits where it tresspasses the limit and becomes a social menace has, for present no alternative but to imprision them.
Rehabilition of criminals is a relatively newer concept and methodologies to implement rehabilation in fields of drug menace is needed to be developed soon.
I do agree that a whole lot of people, especially of productive age are behind bars in USA.
We do need to think about developing rehabilitative methodologies to overcome the problem and put these productive people to take care of their families, children and society at large.
Guest
Posted: Sunday, April 29, 2012 11:46:34 AM

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Quote:
There's a lot of uneducated men and women in our US prisons. That's a prime reason they chose to do something criminal in the 1st place. They weren't smart enough or didn't think with enough long-range intellect about the possible ramifications of their actions. They were desperate enough to commit whatever crime they committed.


The argument with this thought though is that they had the same opportunities as everyone else. The public school system is open to all. So do we blame teachers for not doing their job in educating these people well enough so therefore they turned to crime? Every prison has an educational system within it's system as well. Once inside they can choose to get their GED or even a higher education. They all have access to books and computers. They can learn a trade to use on the outside once released. Even if uneducated they know the difference between right and wrong. They have the free choice to exercise their right to use the programs at their fingertips. Or they can lift weights, and get their three hots and a cot and say fuck it and perpetuate the welfare/food stamp legacy that most of them have been brought up with. After all that's easier than actually having to work at something or achieve anything. In other words, how bad do you want it?
WellMadeMale
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2012 12:00:15 PM

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Joined: 9/30/2009
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Location: Cakeland, United States
chefkathleen wrote:


The argument with this thought though is that they had the same opportunities as everyone else. The public school system is open to all. So do we blame teachers for not doing their job in educating these people well enough so therefore they turned to crime? Every prison has an educational system within it's system as well. Once inside they can choose to get their GED or even a higher education. They all have access to books and computers. They can learn a trade to use on the outside once released. Even if uneducated they know the difference between right and wrong. They have the free choice to exercise their right to use the programs at their fingertips. Or they can lift weights, and get their three hots and a cot and say fuck it and perpetuate the welfare/food stamp legacy that most of them have been brought up with. After all that's easier than actually having to work at something or achieve anything. In other words, how bad do you want it?


These are all partial myths which I too, once owned. The actuality is far different than anything you might see on television, ChefK. There are two levels of incarceration in the United States. One is at the federal prison level, where there are quite a bit more extra-curricular opportunities inside as you've noted.

At the state level..it's pretty close to a dungeon. 3 hots? lol, whatever. A comfy cot? Scratch that myth. Education beyond GED. There are no college level courses if that's what you're implying.

Vocational training? Not anymore. Costs too much. For instance, I know in Missouri, each inmate is given a roll of toilet paper and expected to last 3 weeks. One small bar (hotel courtesy size) every two weeks. The gruel which passes for sustenance @ meal time...I wouldn't try to feed to a dog, literally. You or I wouldn't even think about trying to put that crap in our mouths if we had a choice (and we do).

You can find anything in the food served to you, made by prison inmates (with axes to grind or just to be assholes). Pubic hair, pieces of asphalt, rocks, rubber bands, carpet, used TP... you name it. Imagine the worst shit you could find in a meal prepared by murderers and rapists who are NEVER getting out of prison (but they got a cushy kitchen job) cuz they sucked some guard's dick or fucked the heifer guard every other weekend.

The reality is so much worse than really...anything you can imagine.

So you get your G.E.D. and released after 36 or 48 months (with time off for 'good behavior', meaning you didn't get into any self-preservation fights to extend your original sentence) and you go back out to the world armed with knowledge and a felony.

But the local municipal garbage dump isn't hiring. The tire shop is laying off. And you ain't getting a job working with the public, a cash register or anywhere which requires even a simple background check to make sure you're not a convicted (gasp) drug user.

It is pretty much self perpetuating and once you are in the machine getting ground down for the amusement of guards (who all volunteer to work in that environment for $8 to $14 an hour)... what person would choose to work in such an environment... ask yourself that!

Such a convicted person is fuckered...

They are not on easy street, Chef.

Hell, they'd rather be in a war zone, with automatic weapons and MRE's, and anything to relieve the incessant boredom, broken up by moments of sheer terror at the thought of being someone or some group's - little buttfuck / dick eating toy.

Just a walk in the park! confused5

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
elitfromnorth
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2012 3:37:40 PM

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Joined: 2/12/2012
Posts: 1,620
Location: Burrowed, Norway
chefkathleen wrote:


The argument with this thought though is that they had the same opportunities as everyone else. The public school system is open to all. So do we blame teachers for not doing their job in educating these people well enough so therefore they turned to crime?


So what about those that doesn't do well in theoretical subjects? You have a lot of kids that struggle to write a good paper and don't find interest in books or maths, but if you give them an old car they'll dig into it with more enthusiasm than a nerdy kid who gets an equation. But how many schools will adjust their schedule to take care of these kids, other than call them dumb? Is it any wonder these kids drop out of high school when it's all about theory? How many places will hire a stranger that's a high school drop out apart from McDonalds?

And then you have the kids that have unstable homes. Abusive parents or parents that doesn't give a shit. Victims of bullies and so many other things that adds additional challenges on kids. Hell, I know how much my parents splitting up affected my schoolwork when I was in my mid teens. What about those that have worse conditions than I had. Is it any wonder many of these kids drop out and realise that the only way they can survive is becoming criminals and joining gangs?

No, not everyone can be saved, but you need to remember that there are still individuals in prison that just wants a chance they were never really given.

"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
Ruthie
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2012 3:42:42 PM

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Joined: 10/21/2010
Posts: 2,363
Location: United States
WellMadeMale wrote:


These are all partial myths which I too, once owned. The actuality is far different than anything you might see on television, ChefK. There are two levels of incarceration in the United States. One is at the federal prison level, where there are quite a bit more extra-curricular opportunities inside as you've noted.

At the state level..it's pretty close to a dungeon. 3 hots? lol, whatever. A comfy cot? Scratch that myth. Education beyond GED. There are no college level courses if that's what you're implying.

Vocational training? Not anymore. Costs too much. For instance, I know in Missouri, each inmate is given a roll of toilet paper and expected to last 3 weeks. One small bar (hotel courtesy size) every two weeks. The gruel which passes for sustenance @ meal time...I wouldn't try to feed to a dog, literally. You or I wouldn't even think about trying to put that crap in our mouths if we had a choice (and we do).

You can find anything in the food served to you, made by prison inmates (with axes to grind or just to be assholes). Pubic hair, pieces of asphalt, rocks, rubber bands, carpet, used TP... you name it. Imagine the worst shit you could find in a meal prepared by murderers and rapists who are NEVER getting out of prison (but they got a cushy kitchen job) cuz they sucked some guard's dick or fucked the heifer guard every other weekend.

The reality is so much worse than really...anything you can imagine.

So you get your G.E.D. and released after 36 or 48 months (with time off for 'good behavior', meaning you didn't get into any self-preservation fights to extend your original sentence) and you go back out to the world armed with knowledge and a felony.

But the local municipal garbage dump isn't hiring. The tire shop is laying off. And you ain't getting a job working with the public, a cash register or anywhere which requires even a simple background check to make sure you're not a convicted (gasp) drug user.

It is pretty much self perpetuating and once you are in the machine getting ground down for the amusement of guards (who all volunteer to work in that environment for $8 to $14 an hour)... what person would choose to work in such an environment... ask yourself that!

Such a convicted person is fuckered...

They are not on easy street, Chef.

Hell, they'd rather be in a war zone, with automatic weapons and MRE's, and anything to relieve the incessant boredom, broken up by moments of sheer terror at the thought of being someone or some group's - little buttfuck / dick eating toy.

Just a walk in the park! confused5


Most of the so called "country club" prisons are in the federal system. Our local county jail only serves two meals a day, there is no air-conditioning, and the inmates are only allowed thirty minutes of visitation a week, including the ones awaiting trial. Conditions in jails and state prisons are bad, but the issue is the purpose of prison. What do we do with people who don't follow societies rules?

Guest
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2012 6:30:21 PM

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I never said they were on easy street Jeff. But I do know people that work in the local level jails county and the prisons. Stark has a couple of good friends of mine working there as guards, cooks, nurses and secretaries. I know what most of the gen pop will have you believe and what actually happens in them. As for them not being able to get jobs, it's all in how bad they want one, what kind of work they're willing to do and how hard they have to work to do it which make their minds up for them. A lot of prisons are different than local jails. But they, the prisoners, all have access to things that can better their lot in life if they want it. At least in Florida, Texas and Ohio. That's the ones I'm more familiar with. Don't know a damn thing about country club jails except what I've seen in the paper and on tv.

Quote:
So what about those that doesn't do well in theoretical subjects? You have a lot of kids that struggle to write a good paper and don't find interest in books or maths, but if you give them an old car they'll dig into it with more enthusiasm than a nerdy kid who gets an equation. But how many schools will adjust their schedule to take care of these kids, other than call them dumb? Is it any wonder these kids drop out of high school when it's all about theory? How many places will hire a stranger that's a high school drop out apart from McDonalds?


They don't have to adjust their schedules to each student. They have counselors and teachers and programs for them either in the local schools or in trade/technical schools.
As for the "unstable" home. How long are they going to be able to use that excuse? All the way up to their late teens and early twenties? Teachers offer to guide them to the right venues. Most or a good portion of them choose not to take it.
DLizze
Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 3:11:05 AM

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Joined: 4/23/2011
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Conditions in the Maryland State system are not quite as bad as wellmademale has said, but his description certainly applies to all 23 county and the Baltimore City lockups.

However. as I understand it, the original question was, "are prisons becoming places for retribution instead of rehabilitation?"
My reply to that is , "No. They are not BECOMING places of retribution; that is what they always have been."

One of the biggest problems with the entire US enforcement and judicial system is that it has to be self-perpetuating in order to survive. There is no incentive to "win" any of the so-called "war on" programs in this country, becasue if they were won, the program would end, and hundreds of people would have to find other employment.

"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
lafayettemister
Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 7:58:52 AM

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Location: Alabama, United States
Prison has become our throw away society. We send guys (and women) in there and they come out better criminals. We all know rape and beatings are common, and we are ok with that because the "deserve" it. Guards look the other way, wardens allow it, society condones it.... laws are made to be broken in prison. But what does that teach the prisoners? They go back on the outside with an even greater distrust of police and the system. They know the laws don't pertain to them, so they disregard the law. And it isn't just rapists and child molestors that get raped. It's the thieves, marijuana dealers, drunk drivers, tax evaders.... all who will be back out in a few short years. If we want our prisoners to be law abiding citizens, then we need to practice what we preach while they're incarcerated.

Prisoner life should be hard, it should suck, and it should make a person NEVER want to go back to prison. But it should be lawful. They should have the same personal guarantees of safety as everyone else. If they feel disposable on the inside, they'll feel disposable on the outside. There is nothing to gain by putting a guy with a 3year sentence anywhere near a guy with a life sentence. The lifer has nothing to lose by making the 3 year guy's life miserable. Anyone in prison with the chance to get back to society should be MADE to learn a trade or to gain some sort of education. Wanna workout? Fine, you can earn an hour of gym time by spended an hour in the classroom or reading a book.

Punishment for breaking laws and rules should be swift and severe. I remember a few years ago a prison would suspend a prisoners cafeteria time and serve him The Loaf instead. It served all nutrional needs and was healthy. But it didn't taste very good and it was boring. Prisoners were horrified to be put on the loaf and would straigthen up real quick when they got it. However, "prisoner rights advocates" claimed it was unfair treatment and had that prisons most effective means of behavior modification stopped. And crime/rulebreaking in that prison shot up through the roof. Pfft.

Prisons are necessary, but if we would use them properly we'd be able to stop the cycles of crime. Or at least significantly slow it down. The fact of the matter is, most prisoners are going to rejoin society. If he comes out no different or no better or worse than he went in, how do we expect him to act any differently when he comes out?





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:53:07 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
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Quote:
One of the biggest problems with the entire US enforcement and judicial system is that it has to be self-perpetuating in order to survive. There is no incentive to "win" any of the so-called "war on" programs in this country, becasue if they were won, the program would end, and hundreds of people would have to find other employment.


Therein lies the rub.
allinabout18times
Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 9:13:53 AM

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Joined: 2/2/2011
Posts: 53
We, the United States, rank with Iraq, Iran, China and Afgan as the countries with the highrst death rates via capital punishment.
In addition, approximately 80% of all incarcerated people are there for drug offenses. Our record as a country for 'rehabilitation' is abysmal with regard to any type of drug rehab. Those systems where there are drug rehab programs have a much lower rate of repeat offenders. If we want to change the prison system many things must be done:
1. Drug rehabilitation;
2. Increased job opportunities, especially in the inner cities;
Oh hell, this is senseless. I think I'm 'preaching to the converted'.



"If you don't do the roadwork in the dark of the morning, you get found out under the bright lights." Joe Frazier
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 1:55:37 PM

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allinabout18times wrote:
We, the United States, rank with Iraq, Iran, China and Afgan as the countries with the highrst death rates via capital punishment.
In addition, approximately 80% of all incarcerated people are there for drug offenses. Our record as a country for 'rehabilitation' is abysmal with regard to any type of drug rehab. Those systems where there are drug rehab programs have a much lower rate of repeat offenders. If we want to change the prison system many things must be done:
1. Drug rehabilitation;
2. Increased job opportunities, especially in the inner cities;
Oh hell, this is senseless. I think I'm 'preaching to the converted'.



Or we could actually do something to deter crime. Obviously, Old Sparky didn't do it and neither does the drug cocktail that they use now.
A reform on our drug laws should help for the 80%. As for the other 20? How about like some other countries with a lot of sand in the streets? Steal something? Get your hand cut off. No appeals, no questions. Bye bye hand. Sometimes it takes a barbaric response to a barbaric act. Does it or does it not?
CharlotteRusse1
Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 9:04:10 PM

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Sorry you won't get many takers on Imposing Sharia law here...

We need to get rid of for-profit prison outsourcing. It doesn't save money and it invites corruption.

Writer of amateur erotica since 2011..See the latest at:

DLizze
Posted: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 8:09:16 AM

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"The lifer has nothing to lose by making the 3 year guy's life miserable."
True. But my question is this: Why is there such a thing as a "lifer"? If someone is so eggregiously incorrigible as to constitute a permanent danger to society as long as he or she is living, why are we warehousing him? Life imprisonment is a stupid sentence from the point of view of society as a whole. It's only possible reason is punishment and retribution, and it's cost far outweighs it's value. This, of course, leads to the question of why we have prisons at all. As I see it, there are only a few reasons for imprisoning someone: first, it stops him or her from doing the same thing again during the period of incarceration; and, second, it punishes him or her, presumably as an incentive to not repeat the offense; and, third, it serves as a disincentive to others, who might be tempted to try the same thing. I am reminded of a Navy Recruit Training Command instructor who told us, "punishment, to be effective, must be both cruel and unusual." He was specifically referring to the punishments spelled out in the Uniform Code of Military JUstice, but he had, I think, a valid point.


"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
ArtMan
Posted: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 8:14:29 AM

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The American prison system is a farce. There is and has never been rehabilation. We imprison people for long sentences that really only need a quality drug treatment program. Once felons have served their sentence they return to society as hardened criminals.

You are invited to read Passionate Danger, Part II, a story collaboration by Kim and ArtMan.
http://www.lushstories.com/stories/straight-sex/passionate-danger-part-ii.aspx

Guest
Posted: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 8:52:10 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 534,753
Here in Britain, running prisons for profit was abolished in the victorian times I believe. It's making a come back as the government seem to be selling off prison so they can be run by private companies. Bad idea imo.
In prison you can get educational classes or gain a skill which can be useful for when you leave, this is a great idea as it literally gives some people a second chance of gaining these skills which they can use once released.
They also do courses to help challenge the behaviors that caused the inmate to be inprisoned in the first place.

The sentences here for some crimes are not long enough and of course, you will get a large number of people who will spend years in and out of the prison system.

ArtMan
Posted: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 9:05:11 AM

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American prisons are a bastion for homosexual rape, drugs, and murder. New prisoners must join some kind of gang in order to survive the violence. That means they must either be dominant or submissive. Submissives usually must act as sex slaves for the dominant ones. The gangs are all based on racial/ethnic lines. The Aryan Brotherhood, a violent white supremicist/separatist group uses prison as its main avenue to recruit members. The other gangs are all Black gangs or all Latino gangs.

Prisons do offer educational classes and prisoners can get high school diplomas or college degrees, but precious little is done to rehabilitate them from re-entering a life of crime. The constant violence and rape insures that they will be hardened criminals once they are released.

You are invited to read Passionate Danger, Part II, a story collaboration by Kim and ArtMan.
http://www.lushstories.com/stories/straight-sex/passionate-danger-part-ii.aspx

mercianknight
Posted: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 9:59:34 AM

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Posts: 2,029
Location: whispering conspiratorially in your ear, Bermuda
I do not lament the demise of the brutal and often biased system of punishing felons, however, I despair for the failure of the modern system where incarceration is seen as an expensive means to an end. As with a child, punishment must be meted with the aim of teaching a life lesson and thereby, hopefully, prevent recidivism.

My dream? Keep some prisons for the plain evil. For the rest, indentured servitude until one's debt is paid off. If you commit a crime you 'belong' to the victim until you satisfy whatever terms laid down by the court. Not easy to explain here, and is fraught with dangers in our complex society, however, a simple example is thus:

If you break a window then you must work off the cost of the damage plus compensation as set down by the court within a given timeframe and based upon set hourly rates of pay e.g. mowing the victims lawn could pay off the costs within 2 weekends. Failure to adhere to the indenture would have escalating consequences to encourage compliance i.e. start with a public flogging for first breach; branding for a second and then inquisition style incarceration for a third.

Too extreme? Cheaper on the tax payer. And for victims who do not want to confront or ever see their assailants again, then the felon is assigned to (local) government servitude for a similar time period.

Now my beloved tree-hugging libertarians - what say you? bootyshake

"Whoa, lady, I only speak two languages, English and bad English." - Korben Dallas, from The Fifth Element

"If history repeats itself, and the unexpected always happens, how incapable must man be of learning from experience?" - George Bernard Shaw
LadyX
Posted: Thursday, May 03, 2012 3:50:00 PM

Rank: Artistic Tart

Joined: 9/25/2009
Posts: 4,827
mercianknight wrote:


what say you?


You would fit right in with most Islamic regimes. I hear it works pretty well for them, so long as you don't mind women getting raped, then prosecuted for being raped...but hey, those annoying vegetable thieves did get their hands lopped off, so we can all drink to that. Who really gives a damn about human rights anyway?
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, May 04, 2012 3:32:12 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,289
Location: Cakeland, United States
Merc, I had no idea that you were so... medieval.

How delicious.

I say we bring back public floggings, public stockading, as well as making everyone convicted of misdemeanors (why limit this to class A/B/C felons) wear special neon orange shirts or yellow shoes to identify their behavior to the rest of society.

Convicted sexual predators shouldn't be the only people enjoying such advertisement.



If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
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