Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

w00t! Precedent established Options · View
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, May 04, 2012 3:19:04 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,281
Location: Cakeland, United States
Judge rules - An IP-Address does not identify a person (or a bit-torrent pirate)!

A landmark ruling in one of the many mass-BitTorrent lawsuits in the US has delivered a severe blow to a thus far lucrative business.

Among other things, New York Judge Gary Brown explains in great detail why an IP-address is not sufficient evidence to identify copyright infringers.

According to the Judge this lack of specific evidence means that many alleged BitTorrent pirates have been wrongfully accused by copyright holders.

The History of File-Sharing Just to point things out for the audience.

Filesharing has come a long way, and with it, many industries have been born.

While it provides challenges to many of the big media conglomerates, it undoubtedly enriched the lives of many independent creators. Distribution is no longer something for the happy few, which shows as tens of thousands of artists share their work for free online every year.

Filesharing as a technology is good. Let’s make sure it stays around so that we may continue to share our thoughts, ideas, and art in order to better ourselves, our communities, and our earth. Anyone who is against that must obviously dream of world destruction, or at the least, wish for human progress to stop.


If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, May 04, 2012 7:13:32 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,281
Location: Cakeland, United States
Now if the US Senate just has enough common sense to reject CISPA... I might start to feel like I truly live in the land of the free - America, again. Notice who wants it to pass and who says it is a worthless piece of privacy busting shit.

CISPA would "waive every single privacy law ever enacted in the name of cybersecurity," Rep. Jared Polis, a Colorado Democrat and onetime Web entrepreneur, said during the debate. "Allowing the military and NSA to spy on Americans on American soil goes against every principle this country was founded on."

Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and author of CISPA, responded by telling his colleagues to ignore "all the things they're saying about the bill that are not true." He pleaded: "Stand for America! Support this bill!"
Says the uber patriot as he wraps himself and his ideals in the flag.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
charmbrights
Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2012 2:55:42 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 192
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
CISPA doesn't matter, does it? Either it passes or it doesn't, but that will only change actions already taken by your government from hidden-and-illegal to hidden-and-legal. There is ample evidence that the US Government, in particular the Executive, does what it pleases irrespective of the law. The latest obvious example is Guantanamo, where US law applies, unless you are an inmate.

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) on charmbrights.webs.com/novels.htm.
nicola
Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2012 4:44:29 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,416
Location: The Orgasmatron
AOL give out the same IP to thousands of customers.

Until there's a unique identifier for each machine, it's never going to be cut and dried. Even then, a person can claim someone else was using their machine anyway (if it were a one off incident).

Gav told me they are planning on doing something to identify individual pc's now, that's going to hurt the people who are happy stealing movies / music / stories / anything on the web.

charmbrights
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2012 2:29:18 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 192
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
nicola wrote:
AOL give out the same IP to thousands of customers.

Until there's a unique identifier for each machine, it's never going to be cut and dried. Even then, a person can claim someone else was using their machine anyway (if it were a one off incident).

Gav told me they are planning on doing something to identify individual pc's now, that's going to hurt the people who are happy stealing movies / music / stories / anything on the web.

I also use an ISP which has dynamic IP allocation - but - the ISP knows exactly which PC is on-line via a particular IP at any given moment, otherwise they couldn't send each individual packet to the correct PC (see note below), or (more importantly for the ISP) bill the time/traffic to the right customer. Therefore, with considerable effort, the PC using any IP at any known moment can be identified. For which purposes the government will deem it worth the effort involved is a matter for them. Clearly Joe Public will think it was worthwhile to track terrorists, but my bet is that the vice squad will decide that porn user tracing is also worthwhile, if only because it is their job, similarly with the copyright fraud police.

My question is "If porn is corrupting those viewing it, how are the vice police protected from being corrupted?"

Note: Yes, I know about promiscuous read.

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) on charmbrights.webs.com/novels.htm.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2012 11:04:33 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,281
Location: Cakeland, United States
nicola wrote:
AOL give out the same IP to thousands of customers.

Until there's a unique identifier for each machine, it's never going to be cut and dried. Even then, a person can claim someone else was using their machine anyway (if it were a one off incident).

Gav told me they are planning on doing something to identify individual pc's now, that's going to hurt the people who are happy stealing movies / music / stories / anything on the web.



How to identify each unique device on any network. There is a lot of harvesting occurring across the internet.

Just be aware that you are not as hidden as you think you are...unless you're really going out of your way to jump around and conceal.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
pb69
Posted: Thursday, May 31, 2012 4:50:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 8/4/2010
Posts: 68
Location: United States
charmbrights wrote:
I also use an ISP which has dynamic IP allocation - but - the ISP knows exactly which PC is on-line via a particular IP at any given moment, otherwise they couldn't send each individual packet to the correct PC (see note below), or (more importantly for the ISP) bill the time/traffic to the right customer. Therefore, with considerable effort, the PC using any IP at any known moment can be identified. For which purposes the government will deem it worth the effort involved is a matter for them. Clearly Joe Public will think it was worthwhile to track terrorists, but my bet is that the vice squad will decide that porn user tracing is also worthwhile, if only because it is their job, similarly with the copyright fraud police.


I was once employed at a nationwide ISP here, in the United States. We were required by federal law to retain, for no less than 24 months, the records linking each user to the assigned dynamic IP address as well as the start and stop times for that allocation. More than once my employer was subpoenaed by law enforcement to provide this information for specific user(s) over a specific time period. coffee

I rather doubt any of these subpoena were to track terrorists.

WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, June 01, 2012 5:56:13 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,281
Location: Cakeland, United States
nicola wrote:
Gav told me they are planning on doing something to identify individual pc's now, that's going to hurt the people who are happy stealing movies / music / stories / anything on the web.


You Will Never Kill Piracy, and Piracy Will Never Kill You

Short of passing a law that allows the actual blacklisting of websites like China and Iran,
there is no legislative solution. That’s what SOPA and PIPA were attempting to do, but it
so obviously trampled on the First Amendment, it was laughed out of existence as the
entire internet protested it.


The only other thing you could get the internet to agree on was if they tried to institute a ban on cat pictures.


Currently, if you own a cell phone which is turned on/activated - your expectations of privacy are already merely an illusion.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, June 01, 2012 6:06:58 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,281
Location: Cakeland, United States
We are all, all ready fucked and we didn't even know it. evil5

So we can get off the electronic grid? Nah, they got those bases covered too.

The former NSA official held his thumb and forefinger close together: “We are that far from a turnkey totalitarian state.”

In secret listening rooms nationwide, NSA software examines every email, phone call, and tweet as they zip by.

If ya can't beat 'em... pay someone to do it for you.
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.