Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

The Rise of Logical Punctuation Options · View
nicola
Posted: Wednesday, April 04, 2012 6:15:15 PM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 24,850
Location: Sydney, Australia
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/the_good_word/2011/05/the_rise_of_logical_punctuation.single.html

This is how I was taught English in school (in the UK).

US English differs regarding punctuation, however both forms are equally valid in my opinion.

Of course I am biased a little towards the "British" method, it makes more sense to me.
DirtyMartini
Posted: Sunday, April 08, 2012 7:51:04 PM

Rank: Purveyor of Poetry & Porn

Joined: 10/19/2009
Posts: 5,720
Location: Right here on Lush Stories...
nicola wrote:


US English differs regarding punctuation, however both forms are equally valid in my opinion.



I had no idea there was a difference actually...dontknow

Then again, don't go by me...I'm admittedly clueless about stuff like this...


You know you want it, you know you need it bad...get it now on Amazon.com...
Lush Erotica, an Anthology of Award Winning Sex Stories

DLizze
Posted: Sunday, April 08, 2012 10:04:23 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,501
I was educated in US public schools. I was taught that if the quotation marks were to denote a title, the period belongs outside, but if the quotation marks were for dialogue, uinless followed by a clause such as he said, the period belongs inside the quotes, because it is the end of the spokenb sentence. - (Incidentally, I find all that very logical, so wonder why the author of the article felt the need to point out logic in punctuation as if it were something new.)

"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
nicola
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2012 9:17:15 PM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 24,850
Location: Sydney, Australia
sprite
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2012 9:20:59 PM

Rank: Her Royal Spriteness

Joined: 6/18/2010
Posts: 13,596
Location: My Tower, United States
this is a porn site, damn you! quit trying to edjumacate us!
nicola
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2012 9:39:55 PM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 24,850
Location: Sydney, Australia
"I've been confusing myself over this for 30 years, I need closure!" Said Nicola. evil4

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style#Quotation_marks

Quote:
Punctuation inside or outside

On Wikipedia, place all punctuation marks inside the quotation marks if they are part of the quoted material and outside if they are not. This practice is sometimes referred to as logical quotation. It is used here because it is deemed by Wikipedia consensus to be more in keeping with the principle of minimal change. This punctuation system does not require placing final periods and commas outside the quotation marks all the time, but rather maintaining their original positions in (or absence from) the quoted material.

Correct:

Arthur said, "The situation is deplorable and unacceptable."

(The period is known to be in the source.)

Correct:

Arthur said that the situation was "deplorable".

(The period is known not to be in the source, its presence in the source is uncertain, or its coverage within the quotation is considered unnecessary.)

Correct:

Martha asked, "Are you coming?"

(The question mark belongs inside because the quoted text itself was a question.)

Correct:

Did Martha say, "Come with me"?

(The very quote is being questioned, so the question mark belongs outside; any punctuation at the end of the original quote is omitted.)

When a quoted sentence fragment ends in a period, some judgment is required: if the fragment communicates a complete sentence, the period can be placed inside. The period should be omitted if the quotation is in the middle of a sentence.

Correct:

Martha said, "Come with me", and they did.

If the sequence of juxtaposed punctuation marks seems distracting or untidy, try an acceptable alternative.

Correct:

Martha said, "Come with me" (and they did).
Shylass
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 2:14:34 AM

Rank: Gingerbread Lover

Joined: 1/6/2012
Posts: 3,591
Location: Trumpton, United Kingdom
You said "Come". kekekegay

Having been brought up in England at the top of the class for English, it was a nasty bump when I spent a senior year in US high school "Advanced English". It was so advanced, I had no idea what they were talking about. tard Everything they were wanting me to write was Gobbledygook. Where I was taught, they concentrated on writing Bollocks. Two entirely different languages.



Ut incepit fidelis, sic permanet.

***
********************************CLICK THE BANNERS TO BUY THESE WILLY-STIFFENING BOOKS!********************************
nicola
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 3:44:57 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 24,850
Location: Sydney, Australia
Different rules for different folks.

UK English has always made the most sense to me. It's logical.
Shylass
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 9:59:34 AM

Rank: Gingerbread Lover

Joined: 1/6/2012
Posts: 3,591
Location: Trumpton, United Kingdom
nicola wrote:
Different rules for different folks.

UK English has always made the most sense to me. It's logical.




Ut incepit fidelis, sic permanet.

***
********************************CLICK THE BANNERS TO BUY THESE WILLY-STIFFENING BOOKS!********************************
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.