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What have you read, that you've never forgotten? Options · View
nicola
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 12:38:50 AM

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I read a book a long time ago related to achieving happiness.

The gist of the entire book can be summed up by the following sentence.

Write down everything you enjoy doing in your life, and then try and do as many things on the list as possible each day. That's it. The simplicity is brilliant.

They can be simple things:

Taking a bath
Having a glass of fine wine
Eating a good meal
An embrace from your lover (and more)
A walk along the beach

And so forth.

Each time I'm a little low, I remember that book and the advice therein.

What have you read that you've never forgotten?



MrNudiePants
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 6:36:13 AM

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Location: United States
I read a book that was published back in the early years of the 20th century. It was about auto-hypnosis, and was probably one of the first self-help books ever written. It's where I first read the phrase, "Day by day, in every way, I am getting better and better." (Repeat 20 times a day. You'll feel better. It actually works. Don't know how.)

She
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:13:37 AM

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Location: Europe
Nicola I read book you are talking about.
..each day do a little bit of everything.
..work a little, sleep a little, have fun, learn, clean a little...
simpicity -underrated word



"Every tragedy must bring some changes, if not tragedy happend for nothing" by Paulo Coelho
(quote (translation) is not right but the meaning is there)

and

..fox said to him: "Look with your heart not with your eyes" from Little Princ by Antoine de Saint-Exupe

NoahBody
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:45:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 7/19/2010
Posts: 73
Location: The hills of TN
The Happy Hooker by Xavier Hollander
The book that gave me my very first orgasm ever...
Skipping school, lying in bed, and shooting sperm across my stomach
(I didn't even have to touch myself)
Guest
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 12:51:39 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
dancenude A Different Loving by Gloria Brame. I had already been in the lifestyle for eight years, but reading it sure helped Me understand other aspects of it, as well as helping Me understand things about Myself as well as getting a better understanding of the way I thought about things.

Before that The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe. Out of all the things I've ever read I probably remember the bulk of this poem better than anything, no doubt due to the fact that it has been read over so many times on various movies and television shows.

-MV



German poster for one of many film versions of Poe's The Raven.
LadySharon
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 2:24:01 PM

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Posts: 2,121
Location: The Tundra, United States
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. What had happened to her in her early years really shaped who she later became.

The Roommates Trilogy:
Roommates with Benefits
Roommates with Benefits: Snowed In
Roommates with Benefits: The Working Vacation is now available for your reading pleasure

Latest poem, Longing, is out now!

College Sex:



New story now available!
Guest
Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010 2:38:12 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
"Your Erroneous Zones", Wayne Dyer.

It's about the the ways you were taught to think as you grew up, and how they don't work anymore.

"The essence of greatness is the ability to choose personal fulfillment in circumstances where others choose madness."
Guest
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2010 4:58:55 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
There is so many book's that I'll never forget: the two books that I had read to my kid's that are special to me are Commotion in the Ocean and So Much, they make me feel good and just thinking about them cheers me up.
The Diary of Ann Frank I read this when I was 11 and I'll never forget how her life compared to me at that age, and also this is when I became more interested in keeping a diary.
I remember reading a paper back book biography about Priscilla Presley there was a part in the book that I'll never forget, it was the moment when she heard that Elvis had died. It was so well described in the book that at the age of 16 I was sobbing and I still have the image in my head that she described.
The Boy In The Blue Stripped Pyjamas by Michael Morpurgo, OMG, what a book. This is meant for children and you'll have to read it I beg you, read it right to the end and tell me what you think. The reason I don't tell you what it's like as this Author leaves the blurb off this book so you have no idea what it might be about.
Alone on the wide wide sea by Michael Morpurgo, Loved this book so much.
All these books leave me with a certain phrase in my mind.

'Live in the moment'
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2010 8:33:42 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
I read Mark Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson a very long time ago, and have never, ever, forgotten the following scene, and the blend of humour and wisdom it contains:

Quote:
In that same month of February, Dawson`s Landing gained a new citizen. This was Mr. David Wilson, a young fellow of Scotch parentage. He had wandered to this remote region from his birthplace in the interior of the State of New York, to seek his fortune. He was twenty-five years old, college bred, and had finished a post-college course in an Eastern law school a couple of years before.

He was a homely, freckled, sandy-haired young fellow, with an intelligent blue eye that had frankness and comradeship in it and a covert twinkle of a pleasant sort. But for an unfortunate remark of his, he would no doubt have entered at once upon a successful career at Dawson`s Landing. But he made his fatal remark the first day he spent in the village, and it "gaged" him. He had just made the acquaintance of a group of citizens when an invisible dog began to yelp and snarl and howl and make himself very comprehensively disagreeable, whereupon young Wilson said, much as one who is thinking aloud:

"I wish I owned half of that dog."

"Why?" somebody asked.

"Because I would kill my half."

The group searched his face with curiosity, with anxiety even, but found no light there, no expression that they could read. They fell away from him as from something uncanny, and went into privacy to discuss him. One said:

"`Pears to be a fool."

"`Pears?" said another. "Is,I reckon you better say."

"Said he wished he owned halfof the dog, the idiot," said a third. "What did he reckon would become of the other half if he killed his half? Do you reckon he thought it would live?"

"Why, he must have thought it, unless he IS the downrightest fool in the world; because if he hadn`t thought it, he would have wanted to own the whole dog, knowing that if he killed his half and the other half died, he would be responsible for that half just the same as if he had killed that half instead of his own. Don`t it look that way to you, gents?"

"Yes, it does. If he owned one half of the general dog, it would be so; if he owned one end of the dog and another person owned the other end, it would be so, just the same; particularly in the first case, because if you kill one half of a general dog, there ain`t any man that can tell whose half it was; but if he owned one end of the dog, maybe he could kill his end of it and--"

"No, he couldn`t either; he couldn`t and not be responsible if the other end died, which it would. In my opinion that man ain`t in his right mind."

"In my opinion he hain`t gotany mind."

No. 3 said: "Well, he`s a lummox, anyway."

"That`s what he is;" said No. 4. "He`s a labrick--just a Simon-pure labrick, if there was one."

"Yes, sir, he`s a dam fool. That`s the way I put him up," said No. 5. "Anybody can think different that wants to, but those are my sentiments."

"I`m with you, gentlemen," said No. 6. "Perfect jackass--yes, and it ain`t going too far to say he is a pudd`nhead. If he ain`t a pudd`nhead, I ain`t no judge, that`s all."

Mr. Wilson stood elected. The incident was told all over the town, and gravely discussed by everybody. Within a week he had lost his first name; Pudd`nhead took its place. In time he came to be liked, and well liked too; but by that time the nickname had got well stuck on, and it stayed. That first day`s verdict made him a fool, and he was not able to get it set aside, or even modified. The nickname soon ceased to carry any harsh or unfriendly feeling with it, but it held its place, and was to continue to hold its place for twenty long years
.
LusciousLola
Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2010 2:42:11 PM

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Location: Island of tranquility
There are many that have made a lasting unforgettable impact on my life. The first one that comes to mind is "The power of intention" by Dr. Wayne Dyer. My copy has key points highlighted and has been read numerous times.
SilverArdorDragon
Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2010 3:16:25 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/7/2009
Posts: 1,774
Location: Helena, Montana, United States
There's nothing I can say about this poem other than it's stayed in my heart since the first time I read it.
It has spoken in a different way to everyone I know who's read it.



What I Want?

Another world...
Is where I want 2 go!
Another life...
Is what I want 2 show!
Another face...
Is what I want 2 feel!
Another card...
Is what I want 2 deal!
Another person...
Is what I want 2 be!
Another lover...
Is what I want 2 see!
Another hand...
Is what I want 2 hold!
Another business...
Is what I want 2 fold!
Another sickness...
Is what I want to end!
Another strait line...
Is what I want to bend!
Another power...
Is what I want to have!
Another lucky number...
Is what I want to grab!
Another time...
I don't know what I want?

~ Jeff Hardy ~
Double-deviance
Posted: Saturday, July 31, 2010 10:40:40 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 3/23/2010
Posts: 26
Location: East Midlands, United Kingdom
One that springs to mind that ive read time and again is, Stephen king's Rose madder. Exceptional read for me and, one i read at least every 2years max.

Just this one off the top of my head. I wont mention some shocking things ive read on here, they have stayed with me in my mind too, but not in the topic question way.haha..

And somewhere, between when you said “I would never leave you”....And when you said “I can’t stay here anymore”....My heart got caught in the crossfire of all your words....
SweetPenny
Posted: Sunday, August 01, 2010 8:17:55 PM

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Joined: 6/15/2010
Posts: 1,271
Location: State of Confusion
"It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere." -- A quote by Agnes Repplier
Jonesy
Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2010 1:23:22 PM

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Joined: 4/26/2010
Posts: 5
Location: United Kingdom
As an English Literature student, I read all the time but the top 10 books (in no order) that have stayed with me ever since are as follows:-

1. Pride and Prejudice- Jane Austen
2. Bridget Jones's Diary- Helen Fielding
3. His and Hers- Mike Gayle
4. About A Boy- Nick Hornby
5. The Rules of Attraction- Bret Easton Ellis
6. The Beach- Alex Garland
7. The Eyre Affair- Jasper Fforde
8. Lady Chatterley's Lover- DH Lawrence
9. Boyracers- Alan Bisset
10. The History Boys- Alan Bennett

"I think it's important to listen to the people that know us best, if you do, you might get to rock" (JD from Scrubs)
"I'm not mad. I'm just...well, differently moralled, that's all." Thursday Next in Jasper Fforde's novels ♥
"First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do"
“Dear News 24, go to bed!
SilverArdorDragon
Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2010 2:02:11 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/7/2009
Posts: 1,774
Location: Helena, Montana, United States
A book I read thats I've never forgoten is 'Obisdean Butterfly' by Laurell K. Hamillton. It's not that it's a very profound book or anything like than, it's just that it took me three or four attempts to read it.
BBB856
Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2010 3:33:04 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/16/2009
Posts: 311
The Hobbit -- JRR Tolkien, made to read it by my English Teacher at school and never forgot it.

The Rats -- James Herbert, given this book just after I joined the Army and could not put it down. It helped given me something to fill those times when on guard with nothing to do between patrols.
BBB856
Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2010 3:36:40 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/16/2009
Posts: 311
I'm not really religous, but I have never forgoten this poem, it has given some comfort it some very bad times.

Footsteps In The Sand

One night a man had a dream.
He dreamed he was walking along the beach with the LORD.
Across the sky flashed scenes from his life.
For each scene, he noticed two sets of footprints in the sand:
one belonging to him, and the other to the LORD.

When the last scene of his life flashed before him
he looked back, at the footprints in the sand.
He noticed that many times along the path of his life
there was only one set of footprints.
He also noticed that it happened at the very lowest and saddest times of his life.

This really bothered him and he questioned the LORD about it:
"LORD, you said that once I decided to follow you,
you'd walk with me all the way.
But I have noticed that during the most troublesome times in my life
there is only one set of footprints.
I don't understand why when I needed you most you would leave me."

The LORD replied:
"My son, My precious child, I love you and I would never leave you,
During your times of trial and suffering,
when you see only one set of footprints, it was then that I carried you."

Author unknown
nicola
Posted: Thursday, August 12, 2010 4:28:13 AM

Rank: Matriarch

Joined: 12/6/2006
Posts: 25,531
Location: The Orgasmatron
Jonesy wrote:
As an English Literature student, I read all the time but the top 10 books (in no order) that have stayed with me ever since are as follows:-

1. Pride and Prejudice- Jane Austen
2. Bridget Jones's Diary- Helen Fielding
3. His and Hers- Mike Gayle
4. About A Boy- Nick Hornby
5. The Rules of Attraction- Bret Easton Ellis
6. The Beach- Alex Garland
7. The Eyre Affair- Jasper Fforde
8. Lady Chatterley's Lover- DH Lawrence
9. Boyracers- Alan Bisset
10. The History Boys- Alan Bennett


Nice list icon_smile

Alan Bennett is a fantastic playwright.
skiierman
Posted: Thursday, August 19, 2010 10:39:50 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 6/7/2010
Posts: 14
The first book that really truly amazed me was The Three Muskateers by Alexander Dumas. Since then I have read everything Dumas has written.

another story that I found great was The Seventh Scroll by Wilbur Smith
Guest
Posted: Saturday, August 21, 2010 11:50:51 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401

Like many of us here, I have read a lot!

Two books come to mind immediately.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower
by American novelist Stephen Chbosky. It was published in 1999. The story is narrated by a teenager who goes by the alias of "Charlie"; he describes various scenes in his life by writing a series of letters to an anonymous person, whom he does not know personally. Brilliant!

The Holy Man by Susan Trott was published in 1995. A parabolic gem about a spiritual teacher who resides in a no-frills monastery. Simply - timeless. I have given as gifts this book to a number of special people in my life.

Van
magnificent1rascal
Posted: Tuesday, August 24, 2010 1:27:58 PM

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Joined: 8/15/2010
Posts: 3,018
Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
nicola wrote:
What have you read that you've never forgotten?


I'm sure there are others, but these are what most readily come to my mind: The Pearl and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, and The Other by Thomas Tryon.

Maggie Rascal
magnificent1rascal
Posted: Tuesday, August 24, 2010 1:30:54 PM

Rank: Divine Rapscallion

Joined: 8/15/2010
Posts: 3,018
Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
VanGogh wrote:
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by American novelist Stephen Chbosky. It was published in 1999. The story is narrated by a teenager who goes by the alias of "Charlie"; he describes various scenes in his life by writing a series of letters to an anonymous person, whom he does not know personally. Brilliant!


I heartily agree!

Maggie Rascal
sprite
Posted: Friday, September 24, 2010 10:19:38 AM

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Joined: 6/18/2010
Posts: 14,590
Location: My Tower, United States
Lucky by Alice Sebold - funny, but this is a book i just finished, rather then one that has held me in it's grip for years or possibly decades. That said, it had a profound effect on me and i can't imagine forgetting the impact... It's a memoir of her life as a freshman at Syracuse University in NY during which she was sexually assaulted, how she and everyone around her dealt with it, and the subsequent trial. it's insightly, brutal, honest, sometimes funny, moving, and it left a mark i can't even begin to explain. NOT an easy read. i found myself having to read it in bits, sometimes only a page at a time, but it's really an amazing book, and one that i foresee wanting to pick up again and again as the years go by, in fact, i am considering taking a deep breath and re-reading it.

classic reads : Alice in Wonderland, which is special to me and i keep close at hand to just read through at leisure. i've read this tale literally hundreds of time over the years, and each time it opens up a magical world to me. i guess i am a bit obsessed, you could say. :)

Lord of the Rings and EBBurroughs John Carter books: these are why i read and write. they were introduced to me, by my mom and dad when i was very young and started the ball rolling.



http://www.lushstories.com/stories/hardcore/west-coast-games-part-one-the-beach.aspx
Butterfly
Posted: Friday, September 24, 2010 11:11:50 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 11/21/2008
Posts: 1,238
Location: fluttering about
I'm with you on that Sprite, I have always held "Alice and Wonderland" near and dear to my heart since I was a young girl.

A couple others that have always stuck with me:

"Where the Red Fern Grows" ( a wellspring of emotions, for me anyway)
"To Kill a Mockingbird" (well, it's a classic of course lol, a great one)
A lot of other classics I love.

"Bastard out of Carolina" by Dorothy Allison, a good book I read back in the 90's that I couldn't put down, wellspring of emotion here too; anger, sadness, hopefullness, some laughter...and the outcome of the ending was satisfying.
Basically about a young girl born out of wedlock, the young mother wasn't able to name a father so 'illegitimate' was put on the birth certificate. The mother tries to get that changed without success and so begins the ups and downs of their lives together...the main part of the story (after her first husband dies in a car crash) is concerning the next man she ends up seeing. Turns out to be a real charmer (sarcasm) and makes 'Bones' life a living hell. Anyway, I won't give any more detail if anyone decides to check it out.
DBarclay
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 11:05:42 AM

Rank: Mr Nobody

Joined: 2/28/2008
Posts: 946
Location: Florida, United States
I will never forget where they weigh the whales .....
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 4:26:35 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
The Complete Walker series from Colin Fletcher.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, November 11, 2010 1:03:46 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
nicola wrote:
Jonesy wrote:
As an English Literature student, I read all the time but the top 10 books (in no order) that have stayed with me ever since are as follows:-

1. Pride and Prejudice- Jane Austen
2. Bridget Jones's Diary- Helen Fielding
3. His and Hers- Mike Gayle
4. About A Boy- Nick Hornby
5. The Rules of Attraction- Bret Easton Ellis
6. The Beach- Alex Garland
7. The Eyre Affair- Jasper Fforde
8. Lady Chatterley's Lover- DH Lawrence
9. Boyracers- Alan Bisset
10. The History Boys- Alan Bennett


Nice list icon_smile

Alan Bennett is a fantastic playwright.


Have you read 'Talking Heads' Alan Bennett the first book it has several monologues and they are a gem to read every single one.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2010 12:00:55 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
I can remember a lot of sentences of tales written by Borges, even whole paragraphs.

One of the best ones is : "copulation and mirrors are abominable, both multiply the numbers of man"
Guest
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2010 12:26:57 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
bikebum1975 wrote:
The Complete Walker series from Colin Fletcher.


Ooops Biker dude, ha ha ha ha I thought that said The Complete Wanker LOL I'am under the influence of being over worked and tired ha ha.
Guest
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2010 2:28:06 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 537,401
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