Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

What have you read, that you've never forgotten? Options · View
Eutopia
Posted: Saturday, January 22, 2011 6:52:51 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 3/30/2010
Posts: 31
The first 'Big Girl' book I read, and the book that catapulted me into my love or reading for the rest of my life. The book I recommend to damn near every parent to get their kid to read, or even them.

The Day My Bum Went Psycho by Andy Griffiths.

Everyone else has mature books and I've got this one.
OTL
Still a child at heart, it seems.
GemGeekett
Posted: Monday, January 24, 2011 3:18:46 PM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 11/25/2010
Posts: 1,142
Location: A dark, warm and comfortable place, Canada
I can't even remember the name of the book, but when I was a kid there was a book in my school's Library about a girl who was orphaned, her title and fortune stripped away but came back to claim it all. "The Wolves of...... Hall". (If anyone know what the Hell I'm talking about please let me know ;) )

"The Forest of Mirrors" scene in the C.S Lewis's Magician's Nephew.

Several China-centric Books - Wild Swans, The Woman Warrior and The Rape of Nanking

And just becaise I'm a food brat - one copy of this book lives on my nightstand and the other in my kitchen
"In the Devil's Garden - A sinful History of Forbidden Food"
KillianRussell
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:56:36 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 2/1/2011
Posts: 23
What never left me was the Dick and Jane books that infected me as a with a need to read
Guest
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 6:08:26 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
dancenude Okay, once I was in a truck stop rest room and on the wall someone had written, "Alexander The Great, took a shit here in 88!" A little below that someone else had written, "I saw you take that shit! NOW PUT IT BACK!"

I loved it so much I put it in a scene from the first novel I ever wrote, Whispers Of Darkness (still unpublished).

lol

-Master Vyle
Guest
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 12:09:00 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
"The Alchemist" By Paulo Coelho

When we least expect it, life sets us a challenge to test our courage and willingness to change; at such a moment, there is no point in pretending that nothing has happened or in saying that we are not ready. The challenge will not wait. Life does not look back. A week is more than enough time for us to decide whether or not to accept our destiny.”
MinaMiranda
Posted: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 11:13:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 3/29/2011
Posts: 71
GemGeekett wrote:
I can't even remember the name of the book, but when I was a kid there was a book in my school's Library about a girl who was orphaned, her title and fortune stripped away but came back to claim it all. "The Wolves of...... Hall". (If anyone know what the Hell I'm talking about please let me know ;) )

"The Forest of Mirrors" scene in the C.S Lewis's Magician's Nephew.

Several China-centric Books - Wild Swans, The Woman Warrior and The Rape of Nanking

And just becaise I'm a food brat - one copy of this book lives on my nightstand and the other in my kitchen
"In the Devil's Garden - A sinful History of Forbidden Food"


Sounds like "The Wolves of Willoughby Chase" by Joan Aiken?

I think my richest reading experience ever - you know the kind where you are holed up somewhere comfortable and nothing in the world around you matters as much as the novel you hold in your hands - has to be Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.

I have loved so many books, and learned so much from stories.

About A Boy (Nick Hornby) has a passage within it that once got me out of a very dark place, which I will always be grateful for. I love Nick Hornby - he gets accused of a certain bleakness but he really does tell it like it is, he's not selling you a happy ending but not one devoid of hope either. He puts the ultimate meaning of the story entirely in your hands. I don't know many authors who can do that.

Stock answer to most forum questions:
Some do, Some don't

Love blindsides us all.
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, March 30, 2011 6:29:34 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
Markings, by Dag Hammarskjold, gifted to me by first first (much older) lover. Hammarskjold was Secretary General of the UN from 1953-1961 when he was killed in a plane crash. Markings is a collection of his reflections, poems, and so on. As a late teen, it was an important book to me. I sometimes gift it to students now, and it seems still to touch a chord.
Espresso
Posted: Wednesday, March 30, 2011 7:04:08 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/22/2011
Posts: 938
Location: United States
Jonesy wrote:
As an English Literature student, I read all the time but the top 10 books (in no order) that have stayed with me ever since are as follows:-

1. Pride and Prejudice- Jane Austen
2. Bridget Jones's Diary- Helen Fielding
3. His and Hers- Mike Gayle
4. About A Boy- Nick Hornby
5. The Rules of Attraction- Bret Easton Ellis
6. The Beach- Alex Garland
7. The Eyre Affair- Jasper Fforde
8. Lady Chatterley's Lover- DH Lawrence
9. Boyracers- Alan Bisset
10. The History Boys- Alan Bennett
PandP and Bridget are on my favorites list. And LOVE the movie About a boy I have to read the book soon...


There are two books that stick have stuck with me : The Color purple by Alice Walker and Carrie by Steven King. Two women in tragic, devastating situations. But one finds some kind of peace, the other just haunted me when I read it as a kid. Both made me want to write.

Check out my tumblr and follow me: indecentespresso
myself
Posted: Saturday, April 02, 2011 2:53:25 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 3/17/2010
Posts: 966
Location: .showyourdick.org/
Wish I had the book -Monte Walsh, by Jack Schaefer and could find the quote if it's there, right near the end, that summed up the life of a great horseman : )


I say -if I could find the quote because -the understanding happened in a flash but needed the entire tale to understand

Torture the data long enough and they will confess to anything.
jermeister
Posted: Tuesday, March 13, 2012 10:49:18 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 2/23/2012
Posts: 25
Apaches by Lorenzo Carcaratcha.For a very gross bad reason.
The bad guys were delivering drugs in dead babies.I'll never ever forget that as long as I live.sad10 sad10

Never take life seriously.Nobody gets out alive anyway.
Go Cardinals 2011 World champs/IH8DCUBS
Mary Rebecca H---------2/4/52 -8/20/09 You'll always be missed
1curiouscat
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 8:02:19 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/25/2011
Posts: 1,144
Location: São Paulo , Brazil


I read this book as a teenager - It was my first interaction with real emotions. Emotions that were not inocent and childish.
It open my mind somewhat.



Overwhelming Reality

From Across the Room
TJRogue
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 9:56:06 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/2/2011
Posts: 139
Location: Midwest
It's hard to come up with a short list, and I know that in writing this off the top of my head that I am going to miss something and wonder what I was thinking in forgetting it. I love to read, both history and biography, and novels. So here is a short and very partial list of the most memorable books that I have read. And if you are interested in history that reads like a novel, pick up Nicholas and Alexandra (see below), the tale of the last Tsar of Russia, his overthrow and the murder of his entire family in the communist revolution. A gripping and tragic tale. As for lighter reading that is memorable, then I would recommend anything written by Alan Furst (for those looking for well written historical fiction of spies in the World War II and prewar period – full of shadows, vivid images, and fabulous writing that puts you right in the scene).

A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens
Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austin
To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
Nicholas Nickleby, by Charles Dickens
Lighter reading: novels by Alan Furst (see above)
Nicholas and Alexandra, by Robert K. Massie
God and Gold: Britain, America, and the Making of the Modern World, by Walter Russell Mead
The Rape of Nanking, by Iris Chang
Who Are We? ,by Samuel P. Huntington
Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire, by Richard B. Frank
Flyboys: A True Story of Courage, by James Bradley

sexyeyes37
Posted: Saturday, May 12, 2012 6:32:38 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 3/13/2012
Posts: 599
Location: United Kingdom
Seven minutes by Paulo Coehlo,he is a Brazilian author and in each book he tells a story,but also makes you question certain things that you wouldn't think about.

sexyeyes37
HollyShamrock
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2012 5:54:11 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 4/30/2012
Posts: 14
Location: United Kingdom
One if my favourites has to be I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith. I think I randomly found it in a book shop one day. I totally fell in love with the setting, the wistfullness of Cassandra and all the drama with the Americans that went on throughout.

It was probably the first book that I have read more than once.
DLizze
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2012 9:39:34 AM

Rank: Story Verifier

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,495
I don't know that I can state specifically one book that was a life-changer for me. I can remember many, beginning when I was three, and my mother read to me four books by A.A.Milne: When We Were Very Young, Now We Are Six, Winnie The Pooh, and The House At Pooh Corner.

The Summer of my fifth birthday, my mother read Tom Sawyer to me. That instilled in me a love of Mark Twain such that I took his preface to Huck Finn to heart, and was angered when it was ignored by Lit teachers who proceeded to parse and to read into the book things which I felt (and still feel) the author never intended to be searched out. Ripping apart Huck Finn in the tenth grade was my first experience with tearing an author's work apart, and it instilled in me a healthy wariness of those who would assay to dissect any author's work. ( That served me well in college; once I figured out the professor's point of view, I was able to easily parrot whatever he or she wanted me to "see" in any piece of literature, without agonizing over the supposed moral implications)

EDIT: My mother, in a moment of exasperation, once said of me, "My son is nothing if not independent."

When I was in ninth grade, we had some sort of final examination. I recall neither the question nor my answer, but what I vividly recall is my teacher's marginal note to my answer, written in red pencil: "Read Plato's Republic". I did the following Summer, and have read it several times since.



"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
clum
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2012 9:42:19 AM

Rank: Clumeleon

Joined: 5/13/2011
Posts: 3,702
Location: Edinburgh, United Kingdom


The lion is most lionlike when he roars.
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 3:21:07 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082

"The World is Made of Glass" by Morris West.
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 4:52:27 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
The thoughts and eye opening ideas that have shaped me come from many sources! From where I started to where I am now is the result of many authors from the most liberal to the most conservative. Perhaps bipolar in life and in belief!
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 4:54:15 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
I am a man, if you prick us do we not bleed?
curiosziti
Posted: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 12:47:15 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 5/7/2010
Posts: 38
Erotic story about a prince and some non-royalty lady he lured to his bed. I can't recall the entire thing but I remember he teased her with ice cubes on her tits & pussy.
For somebody who grew up on Nancy Drew & parents/school approved literature, coming across that kind of story was a welcome shock. I found it one summer when I was made to clean the spare room recently vacated by a house guest.
Guest
Posted: Saturday, September 08, 2012 10:20:40 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
my fav reads are "doctors","a walk to remember",particularly,the second one,when iam in college,my friend gave me and said,ur kind of story dude,can finish in a day,i started in the evening,so engrossed in it.i forgot my dinner and finished by 4am in the morning,i was so sad,i forgot the time and roamed on the campus,sat at my volleyball court,feeling the sadness,as it is a sunday,no college,i came to my senses by 11am that day.i still can remember every detail.i have read so many after that,but never felt this much,may be,too big or too busy to acknowledge my feelings
RumpleForeskin
Posted: Sunday, September 09, 2012 3:40:42 PM

Rank: The Right Rev of Lush

Joined: 7/3/2009
Posts: 2,834
Location: Lost in the ozone somewhere east of Luckenbach Tx,
Narresh, I'm familiar the "A Walk To Remember" the best-seller by Nicholas Sparks but not one by, Doctor. . Can you give more details?

glasses8

Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwords. - ROBERT HEINLEIN

REUNITINGhis need, her want, in a cab -- my contest entry

FROM:
Becky -- FOR: Matt -- With Love:
a Festive contest winner – honest

HOW HUMANS DO IT: a fish-eye view of sex an Editor's Pick - no kidding
jollylolly
Posted: Sunday, September 09, 2012 6:19:56 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/24/2012
Posts: 332
Location: Texas, United States

I read this when I was in elementary school, it absolutely fascinated me.
TheDevilsWeakness
Posted: Sunday, September 09, 2012 10:39:21 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 7/19/2011
Posts: 1,265
Location: I'm the girl that your father hoped he could date.


Piers Anthony's Xanth "Trilogy" enamored me until he hit about the 18th book... I had to give up after that.
Spider Robinson's Callahan Chronicles had me hooked from the very start and I still reread it at least once a year. I'd love to find Callahan's bar and go for an Irish Coffee.

Both these series of books are punny as hell, and I love them for it. happy8

Shylass
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2012 5:55:50 AM

Rank: Gingerbread Lover

Joined: 1/6/2012
Posts: 3,591
Location: Trumpton, United Kingdom
"The Magic Faraway Tree" books, by Enid Blyton. I still read them now. They gave me escape, friends, and exploration of the world not just in my imagination, but real life too. I discovered that the written word can be just as real as reality, and provide comfort, excitement, fear, and the whole range of human emotions. Her simple stories made me want to be able to evoke that kind of joy and discovery too.

Ut incepit fidelis, sic permanet.

***
********************************CLICK THE BANNERS TO BUY THESE WILLY-STIFFENING BOOKS!********************************
Milik_Redman
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2012 6:02:24 AM

Rank: Internet Philosopher

Joined: 8/14/2009
Posts: 3,685
Location: somewhere deep under the Earth, United States
The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore...

A true masterpiece. This poem instilled a love of poetry into me that has served me well over the years.

“It is a great thing to know your vices.”
― Marcus Tullius Cicero




http://www.lushstories.com/stories/cheating/a-trans-atlantic-affair.aspx
Buz
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2012 6:12:26 AM

Rank: The Linebacker

Joined: 3/2/2011
Posts: 5,144
Location: Atlanta, United States
Damn I've gone blank. Oh yea...Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.

I have written a new poem. It is called 'Long Twisty Woman.'
You can read it at: http://www.lushstories.com/stories/erotic-poems/long-twisty-woman.aspxx
Also, if you wish, check out my co-authored a story with the wonderful DanielleX. It is called 'Focus on Sex.'
You can read it at: http://www.lushstories.com/stories/quickie-sex/focused-on-sex-1.aspx

principessa
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2012 9:15:57 AM

Rank: Sophisticate

Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 3,867
Location: Canada
Jane Austen: Emma, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Persuasion
Gustave Flaubert: Madame Bovary
Thomas Mann: Buddenbrooks, Death in Venice
Henry James: Portrait of a Lady, The Bostonians
Joseph Heller: Catch 22
Tolstoy: Anna Karenina
E.M. Forster: A Passage to India, Room with a View, Howard's End
Evelyn Waugh: Brideshead Revisited
Kazuo Ishiguro: The Remains of the Day
Irene Nemerovsky: Suite Francaise (a book written during WW II by a woman who did not survive the war - its manuscript was only discovered and published a few years ago)

I love reading and could probably list fifty more books that stayed with me, but those are the first that came to mind.

Guest
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 11:46:02 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 470,082
narresh wrote:
my fav reads are "doctors","a walk to remember",particularly,the second one,when iam in college,my friend gave me and said,ur kind of story dude,can finish in a day,i started in the evening,so engrossed in it.i forgot my dinner and finished by 4am in the morning,i was so sad,i forgot the time and roamed on the campus,sat at my volleyball court,feeling the sadness,as it is a sunday,no college,i came to my senses by 11am that day.i still can remember every detail.i have read so many after that,but never felt this much,may be,too big or too busy to acknowledge my feelings
doctors by eric seagel,i think so,i read 10yrs back,borrowed from a friend
Kal-El85
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 6:10:10 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/22/2010
Posts: 2,295
Location: Philadelphia, United States
Surrender The Dark by L.A. Banks
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.