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lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 10:59:18 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/4/2010
Posts: 6,447
Location: Alabama, United States
Republican Governor Bobby Jindal and The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists promote making Birth Control an Over-The-Counter purchase.

Pros:

Gets politics and religion out of the equation.
Makes it available 24/7 to women, like Plan B.
100% freedom of choice

Cons:

Will allow some women to not get their yearly gyno examination thus possibly missing a health problem
Cost to purchase OTC could be higher. (although lower premium may offest) According to an AP article the cost for uninsured purchase of BC is $16.

===================

What do you think?






When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
elitfromnorth
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 12:08:13 PM

Rank: Brawling Berserker

Joined: 2/12/2012
Posts: 1,635
Location: Burrowed, Norway
Question; in a state that has age of consent as 18, will a 16-17yo be able to either go to their doctor and get the pill or in the case of this being a law go straight to the pharmacy and get one?

Second, I'm not a doctor but I've heard that there are several complications that is affiliated with the pill and that there are many different varities. So is it so that when you first get the pill the doc looks at your medical history and then says "Yeah, this is the pill you're gonna do" or is it just "I need the pill!" "What colour you want it in?".

"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 12:14:21 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/4/2010
Posts: 6,447
Location: Alabama, United States
elitfromnorth wrote:
Question; in a state that has age of consent as 18, will a 16-17yo be able to either go to their doctor and get the pill or in the case of this being a law go straight to the pharmacy and get one?

Second, I'm not a doctor but I've heard that there are several complications that is affiliated with the pill and that there are many different varities. So is it so that when you first get the pill the doc looks at your medical history and then says "Yeah, this is the pill you're gonna do" or is it just "I need the pill!" "What colour you want it in?".



I'm not a doctor either, but here's what the ACOG says on the matter of side effects of the pill...

Safety of Over-the-Counter Medications

No drug or intervention is completely without risk of harm. For example, common nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, have documented adverse effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding. These effects may occur even at doses used for prophylaxis of cardiovascular disease (11). Additionally, over-the-counter use of acetaminophen is linked to serious liver damage (12). Safety concerns about OCs frequently focus on the increased risk of venous thromboembolism. However, it is important to understand that the rate of venous thromboembolism for OC users is extremely low (3–10.22/10,000 women-years) (13, 14) and to put this risk in context by recognizing the much greater risk of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy (5–20/10,000 women-years) or in the postpartum period (40–65/10,000 women-years) (14). Overall, the consensus is that OC use is safe (15–17).





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
crazydiamond
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 12:19:00 PM

Rank: Clever Gem

Joined: 7/17/2011
Posts: 2,293
Location: Exactly where I should be!, Canada
lafayettemister wrote:
Republican Governor Bobby Jindal and The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists promote making Birth Control an Over-The-Counter purchase.

Pros:

Gets politics and religion out of the equation.
Makes it available 24/7 to women, like Plan B.
100% freedom of choice

Cons:

Will allow some women to not get their yearly gyno examination thus possibly missing a health problem
Cost to purchase OTC could be higher. (although lower premium may offest) According to an AP article the cost for uninsured purchase of BC is $16.

===================

What do you think?


They could regulate it.
Here in the UK, birth control of any type is entirely free and confidential to get. They easily regulate women getting checkups etc, by making it available through dedicated birth control clinics and keep a record. When you return to get more they simply check your history and when you see the clinic nurse or doctor if need be, they do all needed checkups and examinations. In fact they even go as far as posting a reminder that you are due a smear test in an unmarked envelope.

*EDIT- actually, I should also mention, that even when regulated, unless the individual is willing to actually take that free service, it isn't all rosy. I say this because although all birth control is free and easily available to ALL, England does also have th highest teen pregancy rate in Europe, as far as I know.

elitfromnorth
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 12:21:12 PM

Rank: Brawling Berserker

Joined: 2/12/2012
Posts: 1,635
Location: Burrowed, Norway
crazydiamond wrote:


They could regulate it.
Here in the UK, birth control of any type is entirely free and confidential to get. They easily regulate women getting checkups etc, by making it available through dedicated birth control clinics and keep a record. When you return to get more they simply check your history and when you see the clinic nurse or doctor if need be, they do all needed checkups and examinations. In fact they even go as far as posting a reminder that you are due a smear test in an unmarked envelope.


Careful. With your attitude you're dragging American into communism where the big bad federal government regulates stuff evil4

"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 12:56:58 PM

Rank: Alpha Blonde
Moderator

Joined: 2/17/2010
Posts: 6,618
Location: Your dirty fantasy
elitfromnorth wrote:


Second, I'm not a doctor but I've heard that there are several complications that is affiliated with the pill and that there are many different varities. So is it so that when you first get the pill the doc looks at your medical history and then says "Yeah, this is the pill you're gonna do" or is it just "I need the pill!" "What colour you want it in?".


If it does go OTC, pharmacists will be recommending the variety/brand and you can bet the drug companies will be influencing ($$) these decisions in the background so for the most part, they'll be the ones deciding which pills are pushed more than others. There are some differences between BC pill choices but luckily none so vastly different that it's going to make much of a difference for the patient other than regimens and placebo-intervals. And if they're having tolerance issues with one brand, they can always switch to another.

The bigger issue I see is that kids who become sexually active are just reaching for the BC-pills and Plan-B and bypassing the condom aisle altogether. STDS are on the rise for younger age demographics. In the UK, young people aged 16-19 years are the highest risk age group for being diagnosed with certain STDs. That's kind of a scary stat. And those cold hard facts are often part of the counselling you get from your doc when they give you the prescription, as well as being the kind of things picked up with yearly pap test.

lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 1:12:38 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/4/2010
Posts: 6,447
Location: Alabama, United States
Dancing_Doll wrote:


If it does go OTC, pharmacists will be recommending the variety/brand and you can bet the drug companies will be influencing ($$) these decisions in the background so for the most part, they'll be the ones deciding which pills are pushed more than others. There are some differences between BC pill choices but luckily none so vastly different that it's going to make much of a difference for the patient other than regimens and placebo-intervals. And if they're having tolerance issues with one brand, they can always switch to another.

The bigger issue I see is that kids who become sexually active are just reaching for the BC-pills and Plan-B and bypassing the condom aisle altogether. STDS are on the rise for younger age demographics. In the UK, young people aged 16-19 years are the highest risk age group for being diagnosed with certain STDs. That's kind of a scary stat. And those cold hard facts are often part of the counselling you get from your doc when they give you the prescription, as well as being the kind of things picked up with yearly pap test.


That's a good point. Although, it's really the same thing now except doctors are doing the pushing as they receive pressure from the same drug companies.

Maybe BC should be priced just a few dollars higher than condoms? I don't know the answer to that part of the equation. If this were to take effect, it wouldn't be perfect.







When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
crazydiamond
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 1:21:46 PM

Rank: Clever Gem

Joined: 7/17/2011
Posts: 2,293
Location: Exactly where I should be!, Canada
lafayettemister wrote:


That's a good point. Although, it's really the same thing now except doctors are doing the pushing as they receive pressure from the same drug companies.

Maybe BC should be priced just a few dollars higher than condoms? I don't know the answer to that part of the equation. If this were to take effect, it wouldn't be perfect.



I do know at the same clinics I metioned above, they deal out a bag full of condoms with every visit as well. Weather you want them or not, and gently encourage that you take them, or ask for them later at the other "STI" clinic hahahahaha.

Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2012 1:25:54 PM

Rank: Alpha Blonde
Moderator

Joined: 2/17/2010
Posts: 6,618
Location: Your dirty fantasy
lafayettemister wrote:


That's a good point. Although, it's really the same thing now except doctors are doing the pushing as they receive pressure from the same drug companies.



Pharmacists are a lot easier to 'buy' than the docs. They aren't typically used to getting as heavily courted by the pharma machine (so they're more eager), nor do they have the same governing rules of regulation in place. They would likely very much welcome the attention.

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