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Horror genre has been killed Options · View
seeker4
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 2:27:13 PM

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artistmda wrote:
I've read through this thread and many people are commenting on how cheaply made movies are now. That's true, but horror has always been cheaply made. You will never find a horror movie with an Iron Man like budget - especially in this economy. I agree pg13 horror should be banned. It fits the "Two things that don't go together make a good band name" rule. There are good movies out there but they are harder to find in this online generation, much like music.


Exactly. Look at Night of the Living Dead. Packs more intensity and story than many of the modern big budget zombie flicks and Romero and some friends made it for $114000.

Oh, and it would likely get a PG-13 today, given that there isn't much explicit gore.




One of my rare forays into poetry: An intimate moment surrounded by the sounds of the night

Sounds of the Night

This interview is for a rather different sort of job

Interview with Tina




Guest
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 3:11:25 PM

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seeker4 wrote:


Exactly. Look at Night of the Living Dead. Packs more intensity and story than many of the modern big budget zombie flicks and Romero and some friends made it for $114000.

Oh, and it would likely get a PG-13 today, given that there isn't much explicit gore.




I totally agree. I think a good pg13 horror movie could be made, the only real issue is once you've eliminated too much gore, the movie becomes a "thriller/drama/suspense" film and nearly leaves the horror genre. The horror genre's budget has been effected the least with this economy.
paul_moadib
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 4:00:33 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:


Oh my god - YES! I couldn't remember the name of this one because I saw it so many years ago, but it's always been stuck in my head as a great horror film. As soon as you wrote "this is a french movie", I knew it had to be the same one. The ending was so unexpected. This was a really cool little flick. High Tension. Gotta see it again. :)


Try:Inside (French title - À l'intérieur)

Not great but there are few movies as bloody as this.
seeker4
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 7:47:23 PM

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artistmda wrote:


I totally agree. I think a good pg13 horror movie could be made, the only real issue is once you've eliminated too much gore, the movie becomes a "thriller/drama/suspense" film and nearly leaves the horror genre. The horror genre's budget has been effected the least with this economy.


Gore =/= horror for me. I'm old-fashioned that way. 1963's The Haunting (based on Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House) is definitely horror and yet it's all psychological. And my favorite slasher films are Hitchcock's Psycho and Carpenter's Halloween, both having gore but far less of it than most of their successors.



One of my rare forays into poetry: An intimate moment surrounded by the sounds of the night

Sounds of the Night

This interview is for a rather different sort of job

Interview with Tina




Metilda
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 11:47:15 PM

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I don't scare easy - so horror just lost it's appeal . . . the genre is just full of recycled themes and concepts - there's very little that's new.

seeker4
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 7:05:33 AM

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Metilda wrote:
I don't scare easy - so horror just lost it's appeal . . . the genre is just full of recycled themes and concepts - there's very little that's new.


You know, I felt that way about written horror in the mid-eighties. I'd burned out on King and Straub and other bestselling horror. I actually went back and focussed on Victorian, Edwardian, and pulp horror for a while (M.R. James, H. P. Lovecraft, Arthur Machen, William Hope Hodgson) and found some stuff that didn't necessarily scare me, but definitely gave me the creeps. Eventually, Clive Barker's The Books of Blood and Damnation Game came along and I discovered some other modern horror writers like Britain's Ramsey Campbell who were writing stuff that similarly gave me the creeps. And that's what I really look for in a good horror story. It doesn't have to scare the crap out of me and leave me shivering under the covers. It just has to unsettle me and leave me thinking about it for a time afterwards.

I will concede that literary horror tends to be better at this than horror movies, which seem to thrive on cheap thrills.


One of my rare forays into poetry: An intimate moment surrounded by the sounds of the night

Sounds of the Night

This interview is for a rather different sort of job

Interview with Tina




Metilda
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:03:12 AM

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seeker4 wrote:


You know, I felt that way about written horror in the mid-eighties. I'd burned out on King and Straub and other bestselling horror. I actually went back and focussed on Victorian, Edwardian, and pulp horror for a while (M.R. James, H. P. Lovecraft, Arthur Machen, William Hope Hodgson) and found some stuff that didn't necessarily scare me, but definitely gave me the creeps. Eventually, Clive Barker's The Books of Blood and Damnation Game came along and I discovered some other modern horror writers like Britain's Ramsey Campbell who were writing stuff that similarly gave me the creeps. And that's what I really look for in a good horror story. It doesn't have to scare the crap out of me and leave me shivering under the covers. It just has to unsettle me and leave me thinking about it for a time afterwards.

I will concede that literary horror tends to be better at this than horror movies, which seem to thrive on cheap thrills.


Yes - it takes more than 2 hours of thrill kill drama or even hauntings to get under my skin.

Books - yes - books definitely do it. It's the world I create in my head . . . lol - I tend to avoid them :)

Jack_42
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 9:33:41 AM

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Most so called horror movies aren't really frightening just nauseating with graphic detail like watching some surgery in a documentary. I like some of the old gothic style ones but strictly for laughs with outrageous references like ''The Prince of Darkness.'' (good name for a band). Since the cold sweats of the lived through small hours of my divorce no piece of film can really frighten me ever again. I like spoof horror and can visualize a scene where the horrible thingy - werewolf or whatever is getting ever closer and the victim is in a car but instead of frantically failing to start the engine she can't get her seat belt fastened. :)
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 5:49:54 PM

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Discretion is advised.



And, "Funny Games" was awesome as well. That new Purge film looks trite and too much of a soap box film.

Just scare me without me laughing at you. O Hictchcock, Hitchcock! Wherefore art thou Hitchcock?
Kitanica
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 11:21:21 PM

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Im just going to make a full transition to videogames. Videogame horror>>>>>>>>>>>> movie horror
the immersion and interactivity of games is just superior.

Higher budget, better quality, more scares.

Guest
Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013 3:34:03 PM

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Hooray for filmaking!
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, June 14, 2013 8:36:20 AM

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paul_moadib wrote:


Try:Inside (French title - À l'intérieur)

Not great but there are few movies as bloody as this.


Thanks! I put it on my list of 'to see' flicks. :)

Guest
Posted: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 1:06:01 PM

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Metilda wrote:
I don't scare easy - so horror just lost it's appeal . . . the genre is just full of recycled themes and concepts - there's very little that's new.


Many people have shared this sentiment by I find it bit of an easy way out. There is a reason there are 1,000's of zombie movies. ZOMBIES ARE AWESOME! Sure there are many tired and overused tropes in horror, but they are everywhere. Romantic comedies (a true dead genre) - lets make a new movie now! Guy meets girl. He's kinda loserish but she has her act together, how will they make it work? They are so different! Hilarity ensues. She gets mad at him, he holds up a boombox and publicly humiliates himself, all in the name of love. 15 years ago, you could attach Sandra Bullock to this and it would've made $100 million.

Genre cliches are everywhere. Not just horror.
seeker4
Posted: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 1:15:32 PM

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artistmda wrote:


Genre cliches are everywhere. Not just horror.


The problem in horror is that once something becomes cliché, it ceases to be scary or shocking. I haven't found zombies (the carnivorous variety, at least) scary since about 1980. Sure, some interesting things have been done with them by way of social analysis and commentary, but that's not scary or shocking as good as it is. Now, subverting the cliché or perhaps spinning it a new way can bring the shock back. David Wellington did this with his Laura Caxton novels. He took the vampire almost all the way back to its folkloric roots as a nasty, pest-ridden walking corpse and in doing so, made them objects of horror again.

In fantasy, the problem is somewhat the same. Strange creatures and magic cease to be objects of wonder after the 50th clichéd Tolkien knock-off. Again, it takes a new take or a subversion of a cliché to put the magic back into fantasy. Clive Barker, IMHO, did this with his early fantasies like Weaveworld and Imagica (and did it for horror, too, with the Books of Blood).


One of my rare forays into poetry: An intimate moment surrounded by the sounds of the night

Sounds of the Night

This interview is for a rather different sort of job

Interview with Tina




Emerys
Posted: Friday, June 28, 2013 10:37:13 PM

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I thought "Poultrygeist: Night of the Chicken Dead" was rather frightening. Whistle




Kitanica
Posted: Saturday, July 06, 2013 6:26:47 PM

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Is Europa report out yet?

Edit: nvm it is.
Guest
Posted: Saturday, July 06, 2013 9:39:51 PM

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Horror movies are cheaper to make. That is why there are so many pieces of crap. Plus, there are never any good actors in these types of movies.
Kitanica
Posted: Sunday, July 07, 2013 1:03:03 AM

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captainkirkland wrote:
Horror movies are cheaper to make. That is why there are so
many pieces of crap. Plus, there are never any good actors in these types of movies.


That's not true, some good actors start out in horror. Like Bradley Cooper, Jennifer aniston, Kevin bacon. Tons of cheap low budget horror movies had big names and were great movies despite being low budget. the problem is the people making terrible movies like paranormal activities producers who then make 6 shitty versions of that film. there was 3-4 of those and then they had Chernobyl diaries then something terrible after that. It even goes up the totem pole to high budget. Ridley scotts Prometheus was shit. It had good actors and lots of money thrown at it and Ridley directed the hell out of it and fassbender gave a great performance. The problem was Damon lindelofs hack script full of holes and vagueness so he could pump out a sequel instead of making a quality stand alone work of art which he's incapable of writing anyway. David fincher shot alien 3 and the studio went behind his back and changed and reshot things without telling him. it wasn't even his movie when it came out and he disowned it. it's not money or actors. It's bad scripts and producers screwing with things.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, September 03, 2013 2:39:47 PM

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how about "The Conjuring" and "Insidius" ?? don't they make u gush out blood ... there are many movies which include "The Saw" series, and "The Wrong Turn" series ...
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