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Books you've struggled through / didn't finish, and why? Options · View
nicola
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 4:20:18 PM

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I try to get through every book I buy / take out from the library, however there are some over the years I haven't finished.

"Naked Lunch" springs to mind. I could only take small "doses" of the book at a sitting, often stopping at half a dozen pages. I found it too intense to read it any other way.

Which books have you struggled through or didn't finish, and why?

book
Guest
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 4:23:40 PM

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Theres a few but the titles don't come to mind at the moment sometimes I just loose interest to read certain ones. I'm not a huge reader of novels usually for me has to be a true or fact based story to really hold my interest or a good tech type manual.
Guest
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 5:09:32 PM

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I took a English Literature course mainly because I wanted to read things I wouldn't come across by my usual interest.

I did finally finish reading; Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austin...eventually. The old fashioned english language was so hard to read.
Great Expectaions By Charles Dickens. This hurt to read. But finally I got to the last page and was really glad as the ending was just as painfull because it was so ambiguous.
Kafka on the Shore By Murakami. Not sure why I never finished this book. I think it was because it seemed like far out fantasy. I must finish it was a 20p bargin from a charity shop.
Frankenstein By Shelly, wow, did not like this from the start, many times it sent me to sleep. Reading it irritated me like an itch you can't reach. I tried and tried so hard to finish the damn book, but just couldn't.
The Rover By Aphra Behn(woman) (play script) It just seemed new and differant to me to read, untill half way through and now it's a favourite of mine. Love it!
Henry V By Shakespeare. wow megga yawns. I just found it really like a man who repeats himself and goes round and round in circles. Just didn't have the will to live to finish it. Groan.
Fathers and Sons By Turgenev. I didn't finish this book. The characters and the story it all seemed like a million decades ago and I found I could not relate to it.
Colour Purple By Alice Walker. I know this was the easiest and most enjoyable to read. Hope you've read it or maybe you will now, I think it will be one you'll finish reading Nicola.


Sorry to go on, Nic, but have you read 'By the River Piedra I sat down and Wept' By Paulo Coelho. That is a good short read.
The only two books I didn't get around to reading on that course was 'As You Like It' and 'Othello' By Shakespeare.
Guest
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 5:39:04 PM

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This is a funny thing.. now i've finished almost all of the classics without a problem.. loved them in fact Dickens, Austen, Shakespeare.. and ok I still have a very long reading list but the one book I can say that I have been trying to read for over ten years but just can't seem to get into is Stephen King's Insomnia... seriously weird book and funnily enough it puts me to sleep.. dontknow so i put it down then try again usually after a couple of years.. I swear I will finish someday.. other then that one book though there isn't a story that I wouldn't finish once started...

Working on Catcher in the Rye right now.. seems like a bit of a waste of paper to medontknow guess i'll just have to finish it..
nicola
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 6:02:41 PM

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HoneyBee000 wrote:
Sorry to go on, Nic, but have you read 'By the River Piedra I sat down and Wept' By Paulo Coelho. That is a good short read.


Yes, I have, and I've read many more of his books. The Pilgrimage was perhaps my favourite, The Alchemist was good, but I can't understand how that became so popular, I guess the simplicity won a lot of people over with that one. His books are such easy reads, I seem to recall finishing one in a sitting while on holiday.

What better place to read than on a tropical island, in a hammock, with the waves crashing nearby, and a well stocked bar not too far away!

Eroticwriter, how can you say that about Salinger's masterpiece? laughing6 I did read it when I was fairly young, when I could perhaps identify more with the characters. I might feel totally different about it if I read it again today.
Lisa
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 6:12:10 PM

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I just finished reading "Hotel Kerobokan" by Kathryn Bonella, which detailed the daily goings-on inside the Balinese prison. It was gruesome and pretty depressing in parts, so I could only manage a couple of chapters at a time. It took me over a week to get through that book.
Guest
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 6:16:28 PM

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LOL Nicola, oddly enough when i started reading the book it made me think of Mark Twain's Huck Finn.. only with better english and a little less adventure..
Guest
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 6:34:35 PM

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I started reading,"I'll Sleep When I'm Dead", the biography of Warren Zevon, and almost didn't finish it. Why? Because it was clear he was an asshole! Here's a guy that womanized, got married and had a daughter anyway, became an alcoholic who would beat his wife, had numerous affairs, and ignored his daughter. She even made a special trip to see him once and he still ignored her. So many people tried to help him (including Jackson Browne), but he never thanked them. If it wasn't a library book, I would've thrown it in the trash.
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 7:24:31 PM

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Ekhart Tolle's "A New Earth"... I tried very, very hard to get through this. I know it's a book that had a lot of name dropping on the list of "books that changed my life" for a lot of people.

I take what I read very seriously and it IS a great book to provoke thoughts... but you have to be ready for this kind of philosophizing. I did get half-way through it though before I got completely distracted.

I tried to read it last summer, which was a bad idea, because I have a very short attention span in the summer months. I'm too distracted by sunshine and patios.

I do hope to get back into it, because I feel quite guilty that it didn't change my life on the first attempt.

WellMadeMale
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 7:33:08 PM

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J.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. Shelley's Frankenstein and Stoker's Dracula.

All three of their writing styles put me to sleep before I could finish more than 40 pages.

Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
Rembacher
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 7:59:49 PM

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I'm half way through War and Peace. I haven't touched it in a few months. The reason I haven't finished it yet? I've read 600 pages, and I'm only half way through. But I do plan on finishing it eventually.
Piquet
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 2:21:56 AM

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I never got through Scott's 'Rob Roy' because I simply couldn't follow a lot of the Scottish dialect which the story contains and which Penguin Classics did not bother to explain.

Darwin's 'Origin of Species' because I felt that Charlie labours the point somewhat.

The Bible. After all the incest, death, war, inundation and destruction of the Old Testament, the New was a bit underwhelming.
dontknow


http://www.lushstories.com/stories/quickie-sex/claudia-incarnatapart-vii.aspx
nicola
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 4:14:04 AM

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Piquet, you should write more humour pieces, you have the knack.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 4:25:20 AM

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Harry Potter? d'oh! oooh gosh it's just so long and so many I'd rather watch it in the movies than reading each book...icon_smile
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 6:02:08 AM

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Among book's, I could not get through Foucault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco. It was just too entangled in mysterious hints and suggestions before getting into the story itself. It lost me, and I tried to read it at least twice, before deciding it wasn't worth the time and effort, and I actually didn't have to read it.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 6:54:19 AM

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Conan Doyle's The Hound of Vaskervilles ... laziness attack me lol
Witch and wizards, I forgot who's the writer:) I just borrowed it from a classmate for a year, again laziness attacked. So when she needed to move out from our dormitory, I gave it back to her without finishing it.
RumpleForeskin
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 8:46:56 AM

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Here are a few culprits that bring to mind the words of, Col. Kurtz: "The horror. The horror."

Contemporary writers

Dan Brown (anything) Life's too short to waste any on his stuff.

Clive Cussler: (anything) The hack's hack

Thomas Pynshon, Gravity's Rainbow: (the following is taken from, Book-A-Minute) A screaming thing comes across the sky. It's a V-2 rocket carrying twelve thousand pounds of symbolism, and it's coming down on your poor, deluded, postmodern head.


"Classic" authors

Dickens, Great Expectations/Bleak House: He could write, for instance, Tale of Two Cities, but the GE/BH ilk are too long, too slow, too boring, too bleak -- only fit for unquestioning fans of CD.

Melville, Moby Dick: (see, GE/BH) There's a reason it was a huge flop when first released. Should be approached only by Eng. Lit majors and then with caution..

Joyce, Ulysses: Never in English letters has more been said incoherently about less. Obscurantism taken to its illogical extreme.

Rumple Foreskin rr

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Feels So Right, It Can't Be WrongMore steamy, seductive, straight step-sibling sex, 2-3

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WickedShads
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 12:04:04 PM

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WellMadeMale wrote:
J.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.


Have to agree there. I read these when I was a lot younger...early teens. It took me three different occasions before I made it through the first volume. Then, after I had finally finished reading the first two, I made it about half-way through the Return of the Ring and just couldn't read it anymore. I put it down and never looked back. I enjoyed the movies though.

"I can resist everything except temptation." - Oscar Wilde
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 1:55:46 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:
Ekhart Tolle's "A New Earth"... I tried very, very hard to get through this. I know it's a book that had a lot of name dropping on the list of "books that changed my life" for a lot of people.

I take what I read very seriously and it IS a great book to provoke thoughts... but you have to be ready for this kind of philosophizing. I did get half-way through it though before I got completely distracted.

I tried to read it last summer, which was a bad idea, because I have a very short attention span in the summer months. I'm too distracted by sunshine and patios.

I do hope to get back into it, because I feel quite guilty that it didn't change my life on the first attempt.


That's when I love reading the most in the summer sun reading a book, wow I've spent many summery Saturday's wasting hours away reading ha ha then I go back inside and everything looks green haha lol
DamonX
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 10:02:15 PM

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WickedShads wrote:
WellMadeMale wrote:
J.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.


Have to agree there. I read these when I was a lot younger...early teens. It took me three different occasions before I made it through the first volume. Then, after I had finally finished reading the first two, I made it about half-way through the Return of the Ring and just couldn't read it anymore. I put it down and never looked back. I enjoyed the movies though.


Haha, same here. It took me three tries to read the first book. After I did though, I finished the other two in one try. I think i was half asleep through most them. Its a great book, its just a bit involved for an 11 year old kid when you're spending hours struggling though a 6 page poem on the history of the elves. I'm a purely non fiction guy these days.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 10:11:54 PM

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Amazon Odyssey written by Ti-Grace Atkinson, I read about 15 pages, realized she as a man hating psycho and I threw the book in the trash, the only time I ever did that. At the time I was reading books by academic and radical feminists. Don't ask.

The following is funny, fall down laughing funny, funny as hell, but it gives you an idea of why I call her a psycho. When I first read her I was taking her way to seriously.

“The price of clinging to the enemy [a man] is your life. To enter into a relationship with a man who has divested himself as completely and publicly from the male role as much as possible would still be a risk. But to relate to a man who has done any less is suicide. . . . I, personally, have taken the position that I will not appear with any man publicly, where it could possibly be interpreted that we were friends.” (Ti-Grace Atkinson, Amazon Odyssey, Links Books, 1974, pp. 90, 91)
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 11:57:54 PM

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I have promised myself, year after year to pick up a copy of great english literature such as Dickens or Shakespeare, but every year something else always comes up, or that's what I keep telling myself. So to this day, I can say the only book I have had trouble with is The Dark Tower series by Stephen King. I even forgot I had even bothered with it. I just could not get into it. dontknow
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 3:49:56 AM

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DamonX wrote:
WickedShads wrote:
WellMadeMale wrote:
J.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.


Have to agree there. I read these when I was a lot younger...early teens. It took me three different occasions before I made it through the first volume. Then, after I had finally finished reading the first two, I made it about half-way through the Return of the Ring and just couldn't read it anymore. I put it down and never looked back. I enjoyed the movies though.


Haha, same here. It took me three tries to read the first book. After I did though, I finished the other two in one try. I think i was half asleep through most them. Its a great book, its just a bit involved for an 11 year old kid when you're spending hours struggling though a 6 page poem on the history of the elves. I'm a purely non fiction guy these days.


ha ha me too...I eventually got a graphic novel version of 'The Hobbit' after struggling through the book.I couldn't bear reading any more of the lord of the rings stuff either...
LusciousLola
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 5:51:07 AM

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I have always loved reading. But, somehow I had managed to never read the Grapes of Wrath, a classic that most people read in high school. So while on a medically imposed bed rest, many years ago, I began reading this book. It was the most tragic book. I kept hoping that something would go right for this family, maybe something would get better, sadly no. Not to be. They finally arrived in CA, to more despair. My least favorite book of all time. If I had not been forced to stay in bed for weeks on end, I would not even have bothered to finish it.crybaby
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 9:29:23 AM

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nicola wrote:
I try to get through every book I buy / take out from the library, however there are some over the years I haven't finished.

"Naked Lunch" springs to mind. I could only take small "doses" of the book at a sitting, often stopping at half a dozen pages. I found it too intense to read it any other way.

Which books have you struggled through or didn't finish, and why?

book


The Thirteenth Tale, by Diane Setterfield. I got sick of the style, so "perfect", it sounded written by a computer program rather than a human being.
ReallyHard
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 6:03:24 PM

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"Ulysses" by James Joyce. I trudged my way through it, but the writing style seemed designed to block the thing from my long-term memory.

Making Do

This Old House
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 7:28:29 PM

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I didn't have any problem reading Naked Lunch, but I couldn't read Burrough's Nova Express or the Wild Boys. I enjoyed Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath too, but hated The Red Pony and The Pearl, which we were required to read in high school. It's not really a book, but I couldn't finish reading Kafka's Metamorphosis, it really creeped me out. I tried to read Ulysses but could only make it for about a hundred pages, and haven't been able to read anything by Joyce all the way through.
Chauncey
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 8:49:22 PM

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Bleak House by Dickens, dictionary Size and bleak and dull, Never finished it .
Guest
Posted: Thursday, April 01, 2010 6:53:13 AM

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ReallyHard wrote:
"Ulysses" by James Joyce. I trudged my way through it, but the writing style seemed designed to block the thing from my long-term memory.



Groan ha ha I tried that I just couldn't understand what the heck I was reading it made me have a constant frown ha ha lol
Magical_felix
Posted: Sunday, April 04, 2010 10:48:43 PM

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Most of the books by Bret Easton Ellis are tough for me to get through. I find them repetitive and tedious. I do enjoy his stories and characters though, in small portions.



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