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Saga
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 2:12:23 PM

Rank: Sergeant Turnip
Moderator

Joined: 6/7/2012
Posts: 5,468
Location: Canada
Hello, fellow foreigners!

I thought I would write a little guide that might be of assistance if English is not your first language. I have been living in Canada for ten years, but I still struggle with quite a few things when I am writing. I thought I would share some simple tips that have helped me.

First of all, if you are in the same position as I am, I would suggest you find a friend to always proofread your work before submitting a story. It is sometimes hard to catch certain errors you make on your own. If you are serious about posting stories, then find someone you trust and feel comfortable with. Have them read though your work and point out potential errors. Finally, reading your story out loud yourself will also help you "hear" issues that you might miss while just reading silently. Our brains read what we know it should be, not always what it is. This works for native English speakers, too.

Here are some common errors that we foreigners make:


Effect or affect

Effect – The result of something.

Example: The Viagra he took had an effect on his ability to have an erection.


Affect – Create a change in something.

Example: He was kissing her neck, and it was affecting her ability to concentrate.



Then or than

Then - Then is used to indicate time and a sequence of events.

Example: I was going to undress for him, and then bring out my toys.


Than – Than is used to indicating comparison.

Example: I was hornier than an eighteen year old boy.



Two, too or to

Two – Only used to describe the number 2.

Example: She had two lovely cookies.


Too – Too means "as well" or "also". It is used to explain something that is more than it should be.

Example: She was too tired to go out dancing.


To – To is used to express things.

Example: To fuck / to fight / to suck.



Accept or except

Accept – To hold something as true and to receive something willingly.

Example: I accept your invitation to partake in a threesome.


Except – Means apart from, excluding or not including.

Example: I would go with you, except I don’t trust you.



Lay or lie

Please see the link for DanielleX forum thread, where she explains it perfectly.

http://www.lushstories.com/forum/yaf_postsm1336495_Lie-versus-Lay--which-is-which.aspx#1336495



There, their or they’re

There – There is the opposite of "here". It means "in that place", not here.

Example: There is a sex shop downtown.


Their – Shows possession and ownership.

Example: Their dungeon is amazing.


They’re – Contraction of "they are".

Example: They’re horny = they are horny.



Whose or who’s

Whose – Whose means "belonging to whom?”

Example: Whose stripper was more expensive?


Who’s – Who’s is a contraction of either ‘who is’ or ‘who has’.

Example: Who’s going to go skinny dipping with me?



Your or you’re

Your – A possessive adjective. It specifies that something belongs to you.

Example: Your vibrator, your girlfriend, your ball-gag.


You’re – You’re a contraction of "you are".

Example: You’re an asshat = You are an asshat.



Lose or loose

Lose – Lose means that you have lost something, failed to keep or misplaced.

Example: If I lose this bet, I have to kiss my best friend's husband.


Loose – Loose means that something is not right or dense, free from constraint.

Example: She was now loose from her restraints.



Access or excess

Access – The right to enter or to gain entry somewhere.

Example: You need a passkey to get into the VIP section of the strip club.


Excess – Describes a quantity much larger than is needed.

Example: I am trying to lose excess weight.



Its or it’s

This one can be a bit tricky, but let me see if I can break this down a bit.


Its – "Its" is like "his" or "her". It does not have an apostrophe.

Example: "His" is used for a masculine possessor – "These are his cock rings".


"Her" is used for feminine possessor – "These are her nipple clamps".


"Its" is used for neutral possessor. "These are its batteries”.


It’s – "It’s" is short for "it is" or "it has". This is a set rule and cannot be used for anything else.

Example: It’s exciting when he calls me his good girl.


Passed or Past

Passed

The word passed is the past tense or the verb “to pass”. I pass (present tense), I passed and I have passed (both past tense) and I will pass (future tense).

Example: She passed the audition with distinction.

To pass often means to move past, and this is where confusion can arise. Of note, to pass can also mean to sail past, to fly past, to run past… etc. The method of moving is actually irrelevant. This is worth keeping in mind, because if you have to use a verb indicating motion already, then it will be partnered with past and passed. Remember, passed is the past tense of the verb to pass. This is a 100% rule. Clear as mud?

Past

The word past has several meanings (usually related to time before the present or to indicate movement from one side of a reference point to the other side.)

Some examples:

This past year was difficult in their relationship.

Don’t go past her hard limits.

A little hot tip:

Try substituting with went past. To test whether passed is correct, substitute it with “went past”. If your sentence still makes sense, then passed is the correct version.

Example:

He passed the sex shop or He went past the sex shop. See, that works.

He skipped passed the sex shop or He skipped went passed the shop. See, that does not work, so it should not be passed, but past.


I am sure there are a lot of other similar things that get mixed up. Please feel free to post any others that come to mind. I do hope this might assist a little. I tried to keep it as simple and to the point as possible.

Thanks.

Saga
Shylass
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 2:32:17 PM

Rank: Gingerbread Lover

Joined: 1/6/2012
Posts: 3,862
Location: Wiggleton, United Kingdom
What a fantastic, quick-reference resource! I know a lot of writers (myself included) will find this invaluable. Thank you!

Ut incepit fidelis, sic permanet.

***
********************************CLICK THE BANNERS TO BUY THESE WILLY-STIFFENING BOOKS!********************************
sweet_as_candy
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 2:49:06 PM

Rank: Sydney Slider
Moderator

Joined: 5/28/2012
Posts: 3,462
Location: In the library
A great resource! Thank you missy Hugs





Guest
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 2:53:38 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
English is my first language and I still think this is helpful.

Thanks
Milik_the_Red
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 3:11:52 PM

Rank: Internet Philosopher

Joined: 8/14/2009
Posts: 5,827
Location: The Citadel of my mind , United States
Nice work. I'm sure many of us could use the resource.

Surely silence can sometimes be the most eloquent of replies
- Unknown
Guest
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 5:13:54 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
I must be a foreigner because I found this very useful.
And funny. ;-)
Frank_Lee
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 7:55:12 PM

Rank:

Joined: 1/30/2010
Posts: 402
Location: Cape Verde
Beautifully done! This boils it down to some of the most common errors people make whether native speakers of English or not. They're also points that most people understand in theory, but the mistakes go by because so many people rely on their spell check to do their proofreading for them. Forget grammar check completely. It's the most worthless word processing feature there is.

Reading aloud is the best advice there is. It helps us avoid the bigger problems of the little bottlenecks we all write ourselves into occasionally. The beautiful thing about "foreign" writers is when someone turns a phrase in a way a native speaker would never think of. It's sad, though, when the fear of mistakes inhibits anyone from trying to say/express something. MUCH more important than any grammar concern is what's in your heart and imagination that needs to get out and meet the rest of the planet. Technical concerns are just to put us on the same page, as it were, and make it easy for the reader to get what we want them to.

Also, I think a lot of people in this situation end up being the target of idiots who have some kind of noodly dick ego requirement to show others just how fucking smart they are by denigrating something someone wrote because there were grammatical problems. To coin the elegant parlance of our friends in the UK, these dipwads are nothing but a bunch of wankers hell bent on wasting other people's time. Fucking tedious.

In the immortal words of the late, great Charlie Parker, "Learn the rules and then forget them."




Smoocher
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2013 9:54:23 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 12/30/2011
Posts: 5,273
Location: United States
Saga ... I wish that I had had something this simple and well explained when I was in school over 50 years ago. You have done a tremendous service for anybody that is interested in writing and still has trouble with the simple rules. Well done!!

I've asked for help on a couple of these examples just in the last few days while toiling over a writing project.

Thank you!!

Rick

http://www.lushstories.com/stories/love-stories/exit-33-trust.aspx

Master_Jonathan
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2013 6:37:17 AM

Rank: Gentleman Master

Joined: 3/6/2013
Posts: 2,838
Location: God's Deep Freezer, United States
Very informative and easy to understand saga! I know in My writing I have a problem with the its/it's thing so it is a good way to look at it. Thanks for the reference I have copied it to My computer for quick reference. Well done! :)

Banner below is a clickable link!

Poppet
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2013 6:57:36 PM

Rank: Cheeky Chick

Joined: 10/5/2012
Posts: 6,422
Location: In Your Dirty Fantasies, United States
Excellent, I like this. I know I struggle from time to time on some of these.

Guest
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2013 8:54:03 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
angel7 Thank you for the resource. Very simple, helpful, direct and easy to understand.
Saga
Posted: Tuesday, April 8, 2014 8:56:21 PM

Rank: Sergeant Turnip
Moderator

Joined: 6/7/2012
Posts: 5,468
Location: Canada
Updated with some new items.



seeker4
Posted: Thursday, April 10, 2014 8:25:26 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/17/2012
Posts: 5,747
Location: Canada
Nicely done. Some native English speakers would benefit from reading this, too, alas.


An obsession with fur, a beautiful older woman, a steamy first time.

Soft as Fur She Was ** Lush Fetish Stories Competition Runner Up **

I've been mentoring a new Lush author, sallytheslut2. Here's her first story about a young woman discovering her sexuality with an older man.

The Man That Turned Me into a Slut


Teen_lover
Posted: Thursday, April 10, 2014 10:55:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 9/5/2013
Posts: 70
Saga wrote:
Hello, fellow foreigners!

I thought I would write a little guide that might be of assistance if English is not your first language. I have been living in Canada for ten years, but I still struggle with quite a few things when I am writing. I thought I would share some simple tips that have helped me.

First of all, if you are in the same position as I am, I would suggest you find a friend to always proofread your work before submitting a story. It is sometimes hard to catch certain errors you make on your own. If you are serious about posting stories, then find someone you trust and feel comfortable with. Have them read though your work and point out potential errors. Finally, reading your story out loud yourself will also help you "hear" issues that you might miss while just reading silently. Our brains read what we know it should be, not always what it is. This works for native English speakers, too.

Here are some common errors that we foreigners make:


Effect or affect

Effect – The result of something.

Example: The Viagra he took had an effect on his ability to have an erection.


Affect – Create a change in something.

Example: He was kissing her neck, and it was affecting her ability to concentrate.



Then or than

Then - Then is used to indicate time and a sequence of events.

Example: I was going to undress for him, and then bring out my toys.


Than – Than is used to indicating comparison.

Example: I was hornier than an eighteen year old boy.



Two, too or to

Two – Only used to describe the number 2.

Example: She had two lovely cookies.


Too – Too means "as well" or "also". It is used to explain something that is more than it should be.

Example: She was too tired to go out dancing.


To – To is used to express things.

Example: To fuck / to fight / to suck.



Accept or except

Accept – To hold something as true and to receive something willingly.

Example: I accept your invitation to partake in a threesome.


Except – Means apart from, excluding or not including.

Example: I would go with you, except I don’t trust you.



Lay or lie

Please see the link for DanielleX forum thread, where she explains it perfectly.

http://www.lushstories.com/forum/yaf_postsm1336495_Lie-versus-Lay--which-is-which.aspx#1336495



There, their or they’re

There – There is the opposite of "here". It means "in that place", not here.

Example: There is a sex shop downtown.


Their – Shows possession and ownership.

Example: Their dungeon is amazing.


They’re – Contraction of "they are".

Example: They’re horny = they are horny.



Whose or who’s

Whose – Whose means "belonging to whom?”

Example: Whose stripper was more expensive?


Who’s – Who’s is a contraction of either ‘who is’ or ‘who has’.

Example: Who’s going to go skinny dipping with me?



Your or you’re

Your – A possessive adjective. It specifies that something belongs to you.

Example: Your vibrator, your girlfriend, your ball-gag.


You’re – You’re a contraction of "you are".

Example: You’re an asshat = You are an asshat.



Lose or loose

Lose – Lose means that you have lost something, failed to keep or misplaced.

Example: If I lose this bet, I have to kiss my best friend's husband.


Loose – Loose means that something is not right or dense, free from constraint.

Example: She was now loose from her restraints.



Access or excess

Access – The right to enter or to gain entry somewhere.

Example: You need a passkey to get into the VIP section of the strip club.


Excess – Describes a quantity much larger than is needed.

Example: I am trying to lose excess weight.



Its or it’s

This one can be a bit tricky, but let me see if I can break this down a bit.


Its – "Its" is like "his" or "her". It does not have an apostrophe.

Example: "His" is used for a masculine possessor – "These are his cock rings".


"Her" is used for feminine possessor – "These are her nipple clamps".


"Its" is used for neutral possessor. "These are its batteries”.


It’s – "It’s" is short for "it is" or "it has". This is a set rule and cannot be used for anything else.

Example: It’s exciting when he calls me his good girl.


Passed or Past

Passed

The word passed is the past tense or the verb “to pass”. I pass (present tense), I passed and I have passed (both past tense) and I will pass (future tense).

Example: She passed the audition with distinction.

To pass often means to move past, and this is where confusion can arise. Of note, to pass can also mean to sail past, to fly past, to run past… etc. The method of moving is actually irrelevant. This is worth keeping in mind, because if you have to use a verb indicating motion already, then it will be partnered with past and passed. Remember, passed is the past tense of the verb to pass. This is a 100% rule. Clear as mud?

Past

The word past has several meanings (usually related to time before the present or to indicate movement from one side of a reference point to the other side.)

Some examples:

This past year was difficult in their relationship.

Don’t go past her hard limits.

A little hot tip:

Try substituting with went past. To test whether passed is correct, substitute it with “went past”. If your sentence still makes sense, then passed is the correct version.

Example:

He passed the sex shop or He went past the sex shop. See, that works.

He skipped passed the sex shop or He skipped went passed the shop. See, that does not work, so it should not be passed, but past.


I am sure there are a lot of other similar things that get mixed up. Please feel free to post any others that come to mind. I do hope this might assist a little. I tried to keep it as simple and to the point as possible.

Thanks.

Saga



thank you Saga it's very helpful. Boo hoo!
Delphi
Posted: Thursday, April 10, 2014 11:10:03 AM

Rank: Nerdzilla
Moderator

Joined: 6/30/2012
Posts: 2,523
Location: United States
Saga wrote:
Updated with some new items.





LOL I see you've added one of the ones I struggle with! Thank you!

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