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SOPA/PIPA explained in one simple gif Options · View
lafayettemister
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 1:22:17 PM

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When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
WellMadeMale
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 2:05:57 PM

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Location: Cakeland, United States
Contact your US state representative and State Senators today. If you value the free internet...raise a little hell.







Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
Dirty_D
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 6:52:18 PM

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Down with Big Government!
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 8:16:35 PM

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Gotta love The Oatmeal. This entire situation is total bullshit.
Sirene_Jaune
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 8:49:03 PM

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I just watched a video about it being told by Nichole337 on youtube and the best bit I got out of it was "Say you had a photo taken with a celebrity and want to post it on line well it's just going to be you standing next to a box which says censored on it because you don't have permission to post it on the internet."

So is the US going to become like China and Malaysia which have all their internet censored? Hey even in China the infamous photo of the guy standing in front of the tank in front of Tianamen Square is censored in China.

If US goes through with it then Australia, the world will go through with it and soon will be the last generations to know what the real internet is all about.

Axl - Take a look at our piercing menu.

Daria - I don't think that's how you spell "uvula."

Axl - That's not "uvula."

From: "Daria" episode "Pierce Me"
charmbrights
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2012 1:12:42 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

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Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
Sirene_Jaune wrote:
... If US goes through with it then... the world will go through with it and soon will be the last generations to know what the real internet is all about.

How, exactly, in technical terms, are they going to censor the Cloud?

Also the Eighteenth Amendment did not go worldwide, despite the efforts of many campaigners in many countries.

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) on charmbrights.webs.com/novels.htm.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2012 2:47:32 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 671,886
I agree that stopping online piracy is a good thing, but SOPA/PIPA are going about it the wrong way. They should be targeting known individuals and prosecuting them, but of course that is very difficult, impossible some may say. Governments have always tried to ban the internet and some have had success, albeit somewhat limited, but given the worldwide outcry against SOPA/PIPA, I don't think the bill will go through. But if it does, could the whole world be put behind bars for piracy? Let's face it, everyone's done it in some form, some intentional, some not so. Piracy, nasty and unscrupulous as it is, is always going to exist, but why punish the whole world for a few people's misdeeds? Arr, my brain hurts now, time for a fight with Peter Pan.
mercianknight
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2012 8:05:22 AM

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Location: whispering conspiratorially in your ear, Bermuda
As well intentioned as they try to make it sound, SOPA/PIPA is just another camoflaged campaign by the U.S. law-makers to bully the world into doing things their way or no way. Just like their HomeLand security bull has robbed every American and Non-U.S. citizen of their basic rights of due process once you step on their soil (or into their airports), they now want to extend their reach into cyber-space. Screw them.

I hope the electorate see this for what it is and bombard their representatives with their objections. cussing

Too far? coffee

Oh, and great thread by the way. Love the Oatmeal.

"Whoa, lady, I only speak two languages, English and bad English." - Korben Dallas, from The Fifth Element

"If history repeats itself, and the unexpected always happens, how incapable must man be of learning from experience?" - George Bernard Shaw
WellMadeMale
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2012 11:59:44 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
As websites go black, Washington lawmakers react. A temporary reprieve is garnered.

You know...we need look no further than LushStories to see why the US Government overreacted as they did with regard to both these shitty pieces of proposed legislation.

Nobody here wants their work, their stories - plagiarized. Do you?

There has to be a way we can continue to place our stories on websites such as Lush (and others) where we either learn to live with the situation (while we each protect ourselves) or we piss & moan our way into circumstances with domestic and foreign governments - whose solutions are far more draconian than what you really wish to see implemented.

Charmbrights - how are 'they' going to censor the cloud? What? Think man...

If Obama or the next US President decides to pull the plug on the internet backbone and keep anyone who is not living within whatever perceived ethernet boundaries these fucktards unilaterally decide upon, they're going to cut off your access to at least 40% of the content that is currently available for you to access.

I'd say that would be pretty gawddamned effective.

I think that the LushStories web servers reside inside a data center inside the United States, but I'm pretty sure the primary owner and technical guru do not.

Imagine them (or you...or about 50% of the current membership, give or take x-amount % of us) not being able to reach this website if the USA decided to go black to the rest of the world.

It doesn't matter where you live, if you like to access USA resident websites, imagine those - gone.



Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
Guest
Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2012 4:08:03 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 671,886
Damned legislation hasn't even gone through yet and a file sharing site has already bitten the dust.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-16642369

Fugly
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 3:53:58 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/11/2010
Posts: 1,010
Gurlyboy wrote:
Damned legislation hasn't even gone through yet and a file sharing site has already bitten the dust.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-16642369



Payback is a bitch though LMAO









Buz
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 6:12:53 AM

Rank: The Linebacker
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I emailed my 2 US Senators and my US Congressman to express my opposition to these outrageous Nazi-esque bills. I made sure that if they voted to support these bills that they would lose my vote. I hope all US citizens here on Lush will do the same.

WellMadeMale
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 1:10:27 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
Not much in the form of censorship can get around private anonymous secure peer to peer vpn tunneling:

https://www.torproject.org/

Unless the physical ethernet cable is literally pulled on whatever site your trying to view.

Protect yourself as much as possible, is my motto. TOR joined the recent internet protest as well.


Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
Guest
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 9:30:46 PM

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Guest
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 8:08:27 PM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 671,886
I guess you can fight piracy without censorship.

So Mr. Leahy, what's the next excuse?

Don't worry, they will try it again. Just more subtly.
MissyLuvsYa
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 8:23:43 PM

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Joined: 3/12/2011
Posts: 550
Location: somewhere on the coast, United States
You bet your ass they will try again. Hollywood & the music industry wants these bills passed badly and they will not give up. Obama and Congress will pass the bills later if they think their poll numbers favor doing so. We need to make sure that the poll numbers do not favor them doing so. I did as Buz suggested and emailed my Senators and Congressman to vent my anger and opposition. Don't stop now. This was just the first battle.
Buz
Posted: Monday, January 23, 2012 6:08:07 AM

Rank: The Linebacker
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Location: Atlanta, United States
This war for freedom on the internet has just begun.

They will come back at us with much more intensity the next time. Be ready to hurt the software companies, the movie industry and the music industry where it hurts the most financially. We may have to boycott their products all together to get them to back off. They have a strong ally in the US federal government and most likely other federal governments, who always love the opportunity to seize more control over our lives.

WellMadeMale
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 9:11:16 AM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
Hollywood's blathering bullshit

Anti-piracy rhetoric holds that online piracy is a devastating force on the U.S. economy, responsible for the theft of between $200 billion and $250 billion per year and the loss of 750,000 good American jobs.

“These numbers seem truly dire: a $250 billion per year loss would be almost $800 for every man, woman, and child in America.

And 750,000 jobs – that’s twice the number of those employed in the entire motion picture industry in 2010,” write the economists over at Freakonomics.

These fuckers have learned a thing or two from paying attention to the Bush/Cheney Iraq rhetoric as well as the Bush/Cheney/Obama Wall Street bailout forecasting. When you have no idea of the true numbers involved...Resort to hyperbole and pull a large rabbit out of the hat.


As Mark Twain once wrote, there are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.

Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
WellMadeMale
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 12:02:39 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
More from the Dirtbag Department -

MPAA Directly & Publicly Threatens Politicians Who Aren't Corrupt Enough To Stay Bought

Reinforcing the fact that Chris Dodd really does not get what's happening, and showing just how disgustingly corrupt the MPAA relationship is with politicians, Chris Dodd went on Fox News to explicitly threaten politicians who accept MPAA campaign donations that they'd better pass Hollywood's favorite legislation... or else:

"Those who count on quote 'Hollywood' for support need to understand that this industry is watching very carefully who's going to stand up for them when their job is at stake. Don't ask me to write a check for you when you think your job is at risk and then don't pay any attention to me when my job is at stake,"

(continued on site)

Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2012 12:26:39 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
The next censorship shot over the bow. This time, via editorialized opinion in the New York Times.

Apparently we are to assume that we are not smart enough to figure out the main and feeder issues of the situation.

The <comments section> would indicate that many of us do get it.



In a blatant act of hypocrisy, Cary Sherman the chief executive of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), as well as his allies, are claiming that the public was misinformed about the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the PROTECT IP (PIPA) when they opposed those bills. As Sherman said, “misinformation may be a dirty trick, but it works.”

Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2012 1:02:55 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
Dan Kaminsky, the hacker with a conscience. How he broke and then saved the Internet. For the moment.

This is why we shouldn't fuck around with DNS to achieve SOPA/PIPA goals.

A technical story at that link, explained very well so those of us who can only use email on a computer - can understand. 20 minute read (at most).


It got worse. Most Internet commerce transactions are encrypted. The encryption is provided by companies like VeriSign. Online vendors visit the VeriSign site and buy the encryption; customers can then be confident that their transactions are secure.

But not anymore. Kaminsky's exploit would allow an attacker to redirect VeriSign's Web traffic to an exact functioning replica of the VeriSign site. The hacker could then offer his own encryption, which, of course, he could unlock later. Unsuspecting vendors would install the encryption and think themselves safe and ready for business. A cornerstone of secure Internet communication was in danger of being destroyed.

David Ulevitch smiled despite himself. The founder of OpenDNS, a company that operates DNS servers worldwide, was witnessing a tour de force—the geek equivalent of Michael Phelps winning his eighth gold medal. As far as Ulevitch was concerned, there had never been a vulnerability of this magnitude that was so easy to use. "This is an amazingly catastrophic attack," he marveled with a mix of grave concern and giddy awe.


Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
WellMadeMale
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2012 1:42:27 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
What our congressmen and women and the Obama administration should've read, but most likely did not. Anyone who has graduated from primary school, should be able to read and comprehend this material.

* Requires a .pdf reader on your device. This was published in May 2011 and widely distributed. The schmucks who most needed to put eyeballs on this and engage neurons either did not, or they leaned on incompetent staff to digest it and break it down to 'them'. Probably a combination of both.

Protect IP would essentially open up the backbone core of the internet, exposing us all to much more malicious hacking. But then again, these fucktards in Congress don't bother to read the things they should. They didn't even bother to read the proposed Patriot Act before they approved its implementation. What it would do, is create fear and terror in us, the user community - and we'd be a lot less likely to pitch a fit, when the President's goons begin to shut off portions of the internet.

Yes, I understand that the following is a wall of text. I also understand that it's important that you understand the implications behind Protect IP and SOPA. I mean...what goes on behind the curtain that you wouldn't see. It would literally cost us billion$ more to secure the 'net...or, as I mentioned...make it so very easy to shut off the flow of information and censor what we all would be able to see/read/do online.

In the Think Tank - you come here to think, don't you?

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This paper describes technical problems raised by the DNS filtering requirements in S. 978, the
Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of
2011 (“PROTECT IP Act”). Its authors come from the technical, operational, academic, and
research communities. We are leading domain name system (DNS) designers, operators, and
researchers, who have created numerous “RFCs” (technical design documents) for DNS,
published many peer-reviewed academic studies relating to architecture and security of the DNS,
and operate important DNS infrastructure on the Internet.

The authors of this paper take no issue with strong enforcement of intellectual property rights
generally. The DNS filtering requirements in the PROTECT IP Act, however, raise serious
technical concerns, including:

• The U.S. Government and private industry have identified Internet security and stability as a
key part of a wider cyber security strategy, and if implemented, the DNS related provisions
of PROTECT IP would weaken this important commitment.
• DNS filters would be evaded easily, and would likely prove ineffective at reducing online
infringement. Further, widespread circumvention would threaten the security and stability of
the global DNS.
• The DNS provisions would undermine the universality of domain names, which has been one
of the key enablers of the innovation, economic growth, and improvements in
communications and information access unleashed by the global Internet.
• Migration away from ISP-provided DNS servers would harm efforts that rely on DNS data to
detect and mitigate security threats and improve network performance.
• Dependencies within the DNS would pose significant risk of collateral damage, with filtering
of one domain potentially affecting users’ ability to reach non-infringing Internet content.
• The site redirection envisioned in Section 3(d)(II)(A)(ii) is inconsistent with security
extensions to the DNS that are known as DNSSEC. The U.S. Government and private
industry have identified DNSSEC as a key part of a wider cyber security strategy, and many
private, military, and governmental networks have invested in DNSSEC technologies.
• If implemented, this section of the PROTECT IP Act would weaken this important effort to
improve Internet security. It would enshrine and institutionalize the very network
manipulation that DNSSEC must fight in order to prevent cyberattacks and other malevolent
behavior on the global Internet, thereby exposing networks and users to increased security
and privacy risks.

We believe the goals of PROTECT IP are important, and can be accomplished without reducing
DNS security and stability through strategies such as the non-DNS remedies contained in
PROTECT IP and international cooperation.

I. Introduction

The recently introduced PROTECT IP Act of 2011,1 the successor to last year’s COICA
legislation,2 includes a range of proposed new enforcement mechanisms to combat the online
infringement of intellectual property. Of keen interest to the community of engineers working on
issues related to the domain-name system (DNS) is the DNS filtering provision that would
require ISPs and other operators of “non-authoritative DNS servers” to take steps to filter and
redirect requests for domains found by courts to point to sites that are dedicated to infringement.
This paper seeks to explain a set of technical concerns with mandated DNS filtering and to urge
lawmakers to reconsider enacting such a mandate into law.

Combating online infringement of intellectual property is without question an important
objective. The authors of this paper take no issue with the lawful removal of infringing content
from Internet hosts with due process. But while we support the goals of the bill, we believe that
the use of mandated DNS filtering to combat online infringement raises serious technical and
security concerns.

Mandated DNS filtering would be minimally effective and would present technical challenges
that could frustrate important security initiatives. Additionally, it would promote development of
techniques and software that circumvent use of the DNS. These actions would threaten the
DNS’s ability to provide universal naming, a primary source of the Internet’s value as a single,
unified, global communications network.


[In Conclusion]

As stated above, we strongly believe that the goals of PROTECT IP are compelling, and that
intellectual property laws should be enforced against those who violate them. But as discussed in
this paper, the mandated DNS filtering provisions found in the PROTECT IP Act raise very
serious security and technical concerns. We believe that the goals of PROTECT IP can be
accomplished without reducing DNS security and stability, through strategies such as better
international cooperation on prosecutions and the other remedies contained in PROTECT IP
other than DNS-related provisions. We urge Congress to reject the DNS filtering portions of the Act.


Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
WellMadeMale
Posted: Monday, March 05, 2012 2:52:07 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,465
Location: Cakeland, United States
How would you feel if your website was censored, similarly?

Danish Police Accidentally Censor Over 8,000 Sites As Child Porn... Including Facebook & Google

Visitors to those sites, from ISP Siminn were greeted with the following message (translated, of course):

The National High Tech Crime Center of the Danish National Police [NITEC],
who assist in investigations into crime on the internet, has informed Siminn
Denmark A/S, that the internet page which your browser has tried to get in
contact with may contain material which could be regarded as child pornography...

Upon the request of The National High Tech Crime Center of the Danish
National Police, Siminn Denmark A/S has blocked the access to the internet page.


And people wonder why so many people around the world were so concerned about the threat of something like SOPA -- which would make DNS blocking at the ISP level a lot more common.


Most intelligent people are introspective and doubt themselves while many fucktards are proudly over-confident. - a tip of the hat to Charles Bukowski
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