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Swollen
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 10:04:01 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

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Location: United Kingdom
I'm not ashamed to admit it, but I know so very little about classical music, other than the fact that as I've matured, I've started to enjoy it more and more.

An even bigger admission, is that today I became every Marketing Man's dream, and downloaded '50 Shades the Classics,' great album, so money well spent IMO.

So, please help. I need advice from all you Lushie 'Classical Music buffs' out there.

Please tell me what you know, and feed my new-found hunger!!

Thank you.

X
Guest
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 10:24:13 AM

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Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,718
It depends on what you like, piano, violin. Above all it is a matter of personal taste.

I don't know much either, my dad was a huge fan though. Lately I have been going through his collection, too bad I can't ask him anymore.

I recently discovered Scarlatti Sonatas played by Christian Zacharias (piano). I liked it very much.
If you like piano then Horowitz recordings of Schuman are also recommendable.

Then there is Mendelssohn Violin Concerto In E Minor

Like I said I am new in the field as well. Great thread though curious what others have to say.

lafayettemister
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 11:06:07 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 10/4/2010
Posts: 6,576
Location: Alabama, United States
swollen wrote:
I'm not ashamed to admit it, but I know so very little about classical music, other than the fact that as I've matured, I've started to enjoy it more and more.

An even bigger admission, is that today I became every Marketing Man's dream, and downloaded '50 Shades the Classics,' great album, so money well spent IMO.

So, please help. I need advice from all you Lushie 'Classical Music buffs' out there.

Please tell me what you know, and feed my new-found hunger!!

Thank you.

X


Start with the classics. Bach, Beethoven, Mozart. Throw in some Shostakovich, Tchkovsky, Handel, Holst

Beethoven's 9th Symphony
Handel's Water Music
Shostakovich Festive Overture
Holst The Planets (Jupiter and Mars are my faves)
Orff's Carmina Burana
Mozart's Lacrimosa (part of Requiem)

Some of those you'll recognize from movies. Let me know how it goes. Yea, I was a band jock in high school and college





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
keoloke
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 11:23:59 AM

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Joined: 8/12/2010
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Location: United States
You should be able to tune to a classical music radio.. or online.

They don't just play the music, they also mention the title, the artist and at times a bit of the story of it. It will get you familiar with some works and their artist. Than you'll go from there!


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ElChupacabras
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 11:52:43 AM

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Joined: 8/13/2012
Posts: 205
Location: Ibagué, Colombia
Tchaikowsky. Most of his work is fantastic.
Beethoven's Piano concerto No 1 in C major.
Motzart. Sonata No 11 in A major k 331 -andante grazioso.

Those three are pretty neat.
TheGulfCoaster
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 1:23:19 PM

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Location: Sarasota County, United States
I like modern treatment of and the works inspired by Paganini and fond of 'the Planets' by Holst (early 20th century classical music) - especially 'Jupiter'.
elitfromnorth
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 1:26:57 PM

Rank: Brawling Berserker

Joined: 2/12/2012
Posts: 1,637
Location: Burrowed, Norway
How can I be a true Norwegian and not front Edvard Grieg in all this? Hall of the Mountain King is his most famous one.

But don't limit your search to the old masters like Wagner and Mozart. If you see a movie and the music gives you the chills, try looking up the name of the composer of the music. Hans Zimmer is the man behind the music from The Gladiator. It does wonders for setting the mood. Also Ennio Morricone does brilliant at that.

And I will finish this off by adding one of my newfound favourites when it comes to mood music



Yes, this music is from a video game.


"It's at that point you realise Lady Luck is actually a hooker, and you're fresh out of cash."
Nikki703
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 1:37:25 PM

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Joined: 8/7/2009
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Location: The Other Side Of The Mirror
I like classical music too although I dont know very much about it either. Something very relaxing about listening to classical while sitting by the fire. There are many slections that I like but dont even know the names but listen to them on some of the XM Satellite radio channels.

Maybe this is why I was always drawn to classically influenced rock bands such as Yes, ELP, etc!
Guest
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 3:15:43 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,718
lafayettemister wrote:


Start with the classics. Bach, Beethoven, Mozart. Throw in some Shostakovich, Tchkovsky, Handel, Holst

Beethoven's 9th Symphony
Handel's Water Music
Shostakovich Festive Overture
Holst The Planets (Jupiter and Mars are my faves)
Orff's Carmina Burana
Mozart's Lacrimosa (part of Requiem)

Some of those you'll recognize from movies. Let me know how it goes. Yea, I was a band jock in high school and college


Yup, great advice to start with masters. You can learn how to listen classical music and then you can take it further by yourself when learn how to recognize sounds that you like.

Bach is quite heavy, however I enjoy it specially while cleaning the house.

LM you forgot Rahmaninov (Rachmaninoff)! He is my favorite, extremely passionate and sensual, made me cry numerous times, amazing music really, specially his Piano Concerto no.2!!

Swollen, whatever you do, listen it LOUD!!!! icon_biggrin You need to feel every note of it and than you will tell if you like it or not :)

Lovely thread!
Piquet
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 9:35:54 PM

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Joined: 11/12/2009
Posts: 341
Location: Adelaide, Australia
I would recommend all of Beethoven's nine symphonies.

They are an entire world of music on their own. If you want to experience the entire compass of human emotions these towering masterpieces are a must.

The 9th symphony alone is a work without equal. For me, listening to it is tantamount to a religious experience. After having heard it I just want to go out and fight evil and injustice wherever they may be found.



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Buz
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 10:11:12 PM

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To relax I enjoy Chopin's piano concertos.




Frank
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2012 9:16:50 AM

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Joined: 11/16/2011
Posts: 12,414
Location: Pleasure dome, United Kingdom



She wrote:
LM you forgot Rahmaninov (Rachmaninoff)! He is my favorite, extremely passionate and sensual, made me cry numerous times, amazing music really, specially his Piano Concerto no.2!!
Swollen, whatever you do, listen it LOUD!!!! icon_biggrin



Of all our inventions for mass communication,
pictures still speak the most universally understood language.

Walt Disney





Frank
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2012 9:31:27 AM

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Joined: 11/16/2011
Posts: 12,414
Location: Pleasure dome, United Kingdom

Films to certainly consider!






Of all our inventions for mass communication,
pictures still speak the most universally understood language.

Walt Disney





Swollen
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2012 11:01:39 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 5/27/2010
Posts: 1,044
Location: United Kingdom
Gosh! So many recommendations to check out!

I'll let you know how I get on.

Thank you so much guys. xx
MyHorseIsAmazing
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2012 12:48:03 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 9/6/2012
Posts: 12
try to watch The Piano Guys. They are just great.
overmykneenow
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2012 1:37:39 AM

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Joined: 6/8/2010
Posts: 1,405
Location: United Kingdom
Classic FM in the UK is perfect for entry-level enjoyment of classical music without any snobbery attached.

A lot of the stuff played there is very familiar such as Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto no 2 (the music from Brief Encounter, later adapted to "All By Myself" in the 1970s) and Debussy's Clair De Lune (the music from the remake of Ocean's 11) - other stuff may have a very familiar feel: Dvorak sounds very familiar because he's been ripped off mercilessly over the years for every film score John Williams has done.

A site you might find useful for finding bits of classical music you like: Song of the Salesman - it tells you what music they're playing on UK adverts ;)

Warning: The opinions above are those of an anonymous individual on the internet. They are opinions, unless they're facts. They may be ill-informed, out of touch with reality or just plain stupid. They may contain traces of irony. If reading these opinions causes you to be become outraged or you start displaying the symptoms of outrage, stop reading them immediately. If symptoms persist, consult a psychiatrist.

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overmykneenow
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2012 1:44:08 AM

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Joined: 6/8/2010
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elitfromnorth wrote:
Hans Zimmer is the man behind the music from The Gladiator. It does wonders for setting the mood.


Zimmer also wrote the theme tune for the early 1990s pan-european daytime quiz show Going for Gold hosted by Henry Kelly ;)



Well I guess you have to start somewhere xx

Warning: The opinions above are those of an anonymous individual on the internet. They are opinions, unless they're facts. They may be ill-informed, out of touch with reality or just plain stupid. They may contain traces of irony. If reading these opinions causes you to be become outraged or you start displaying the symptoms of outrage, stop reading them immediately. If symptoms persist, consult a psychiatrist.

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Frank
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2012 7:27:24 AM

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Of all our inventions for mass communication,
pictures still speak the most universally understood language.

Walt Disney





kali556
Posted: Friday, February 5, 2016 7:28:56 PM

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Joined: 12/18/2015
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Location: port richey, United States
i don't really follow any one composer i just know what i like and i like most of it

what's up sunshine
wiseowl
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2016 5:24:06 PM

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Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 1,313
Location: United States
I really like listening to classical music but only do it when travelling, go figure. Find a classical station and truck on down the road relaxing and mellow. I don't really know the composers and their music, but can usually tell Mozart.

Regnadkcin
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2016 10:18:38 AM

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Joined: 9/20/2015
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Location: Beach, United States
Before teaching myself guitar, I took 14 years of classical violin. I favor:

Beethoven symphonies (especially the 6th)
Greig,
Shostakovich
Mahler
Some Mozart
Bach
Paginini
Chopin (if needing soft music, especially nocturnes)
Sibelius


French Kisses in a Darkened Doorway
explore_yourself
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2016 11:15:39 PM

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Joined: 7/6/2016
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Location: Almost Oregon, United States
Creating a classical station on websites such as Pandora or iHeartRadio should help one explore this genre a good deal.

Warning: The opinions above are those of an anonymous individual on the internet. They are opinions unless they're facts. They may be ill-informed, out of touch with reality or just plain wrong. They may contain traces of sardonic wit or irony. If reading these opinions causes you to become outraged or you start displaying the symptoms of outrage, stop reading them immediately. If symptoms persist, contact your general physician. (Warning blatantly ripped off another members' forum signature and adapted slightly)
BethanyFrasier
Posted: Friday, July 29, 2016 8:30:15 PM

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Joined: 5/15/2014
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If it sounds like Mozart, but you don't recognize it, it's Schubert. If you DO recognize it, it's Mozart.

If you like symphonies, I think Beethoven is the best of the early romanticists, and Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Sibelius are the best of the late-romanticists.

If you like mathematically perfect music and contrapuntal, ...Bach!

20th Century Impressionists: Ravel, Debussy, Hanson.

Neo-classicists: Stravinsky

traddis
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 3:46:36 PM

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Location: norwich, United Kingdom
like any music classic should be easy on the ear. Like most arts the more modern they are the less tuneful they are. keep to the 18th and 19th century for easy listening. Violin concertos are generally acceptable listening. Try Max Bruch, wonderful
hayley
Posted: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 4:03:39 PM

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Joined: 11/19/2012
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Location: NYC, United States
VIVALDI !!!!

there is no more to say Shhh

angel7

sweetsinner
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 12:41:12 AM

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Joined: 6/21/2016
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Location: In Bed, Australia
I really don't know much about classical at all, but I do listen when I am studying (great concentration tool) and I tend towards piano.
I usually listen to one hour (repeated) versions of Fur Elise (Beethoven) Canon in D (Pachelbel) & Clair De Lune (Debussy) and then let YouTube run its course through similar videos.
Doing that I came to love a beautiful hour long collection of Erik Satie as well, especially Je te veux.

I am partial to Vivaldi's Four Seasons, Hayley - Spring is my favourite.
I will be sure to check out some of these other suggestions.

Sinner xx ~ Kindness costs nothing, but its value is priceless ~
Lauradj
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 2:19:05 AM

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Location: Home of Middle-Earth, New Zealand
I don't know much about classical music, but I have found some great pieces. Here are a few:

Dance of the knights - Prokofiev
Masquerade Waltz and Sabre Dance - Aram Khachaturian
Nocturne op.9 No2 and Spring Waltz - Chopin
Clare de Lune - Claude Debussey
"Snowstorm" Waltz - Georgy Sviridov



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miniman44
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 3:23:48 AM

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Benjamin Britten
Joseph Cantaloupe
Eric Satie
John Adams
John Cage
And of course Wagner
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 4:01:49 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,718
sweetsinner wrote:
I really don't know much about classical at all, but I do listen when I am studying (great concentration tool) and I tend towards piano.
I usually listen to one hour (repeated) versions of Fur Elise (Beethoven) Canon in D (Pachelbel) & Clair De Lune (Debussy) and then let YouTube run its course through similar videos.
Doing that I came to love a beautiful hour long collection of Erik Satie as well, especially Je te veux.

I am partial to Vivaldi's Four Seasons, Hayley - Spring is my favourite.
I will be sure to check out some of these other suggestions.



I concur with my friend and Haley... I am partial to the Baroque period. I love all strings, harpsichord, organs, and anything with a dark, melancholy tone to it.

I had the luck or intelligence to take some music and art appreciation classes while at University many moons ago. My professors where SO FUCKING PASSIONATE about
their chosen fields, especially my music prof (I was recreation, sport, & business). You can follow architecture with music too, but different discussion.

My music prof would tell us what we were going to listen to, tell us what to listen for, and then he would close his eyes and live the music in front of all of us as he
shared his appreciation with us. I tear just thinking about what this man gave me.

Find something that makes you feel it. For me, strings.

Vivaldi's Four Seasons is THE classic, but there are so many more. Haydn, Bach.

Also, if you like this, you might appreciate Gregorian chants & monastery pieces.

The first time I heard Pachelbel's Canon in D, played by a string quartet, I was overwhelmed. It was the most beautiful thing I had ever heard. It was a surprise piece played by a
Baroque Ensemble at a Christmas concert. I couldn't see the stage my tears flowed so. crybaby This stuff still moves me. I can't explain it. I feel silly. But it is so powerful for me.

Incidentally, "Classic" is actually a period of music and has been inaccurately used to describe what you are inquiring about. Orchestral? I'm not sure. Someone much
smarter than me could probably advise you what it should be called. Music works too.

You may also find your journey will expose you to other similar forms not usually grouped with this classification of music. The soundtrack from the movie, Amelie,
comes immediately to mind. My favorite.

Awesome question! Awesome thread! This shit fires me up. Now I have to listen...

The piece below is what hooked me... Close your eyes and listen for each instrument and what each musician does with theirs. I try to do this for the entire piece, one instrument at a time.

Enjoy!!!

MostPreciousLittle
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 4:12:41 AM

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Location: An angel dropped down from heaven
Beethoven's sonatas- Moonlight, Appassionata, Pathetique

Mozart, Lacrimosa, Requiem Mass in D

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