Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

If you could bring any author / poet back from the dead to write again... Options · View
Guest
Posted: Monday, September 27, 2010 1:05:38 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
Reprehensiballs
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 7:49:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 8/22/2010
Posts: 76
Location: Bedford
David Gemmell, I would love to see more of his work which just kept getting better and better until he died in 2006.

If you're going through hell, keep going. - Winston Churchill
standingbear
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 4:36:06 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/27/2010
Posts: 196
Location: the twilight zone
Mark Twain. I'd like to see what he'd write about these days. The things he wrote late in life were so much different than his early stuff, and his opinions so far outside the general thinking of his time that I'd imagine he'd be writing a lot more angry now, and I imagine his humor would be more edgy and devastating. Also Kurt Vonnegut and Douglas Adams.

"Happiness is doing it rotten your own way."Isaac Asimov (1994)
Guest
Posted: Friday, October 1, 2010 6:20:34 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
A.A Milne.......He actually wrote some pretty kick ass detective stories in his time although once Winnie the Pooh got published he had a hard time re-directing his press and stopped writing them! Bastard!

Either that or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, maybe not to write but more so I can ask him about what he REALLY meant in 'The Final problem' (SPOILER ALERT) What the hell were you thinking when they had that struggle over the falls....seriously?! Is the whole split personality thing truly without founding?! Damn you Doyle, so many questions I have for you!!
As for your quest to write 'elevated' lit....HA. Long live pulpy detective novels! *swishes her cape*

XX
BB
KillianRussell
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 6:13:45 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 2/1/2011
Posts: 23
William Shakespeare
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 8:31:15 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
Jane Austen & james Joyce
BicycleBum
Posted: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 1:13:13 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/1/2010
Posts: 633
Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 2:13:29 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
VanGogh wrote:

Linda Goodman


yes she was gooooooooooood

I'd say Khalil Gibran or Pablo Neruda..
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:12:57 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
stephen king..... oh shit he isn't dead.....d'oh!
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:16:45 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
Fugly he is not even a poet!!!!
magnificent1rascal
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:37:22 PM

Rank: Divine Rapscallion

Joined: 8/15/2010
Posts: 3,017
Location: On the ragged edge of disaster
Erma Bombeck

Maggie Rascal
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 3:40:00 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
It would have to be douglas Adams, who wrote hitchhikers guide to the galaxy... He really made me laugh...
Guest
Posted: Sunday, April 24, 2011 7:25:02 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
sassycheergirl wrote:
eroticwriter26 wrote:
Jane Austen



Ero I was just thinking that when I saw the topic...I love her books!



Yes! Jane Austen definitely, her books are the perfect escape sometimes.
Guest
Posted: Sunday, April 24, 2011 7:29:38 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716

Banjo Patterson.
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, April 26, 2011 10:23:08 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
Anna Akhmatova. Her poem "I Don't Know If You're Alive Or Dead" is chilling, to me. It speaks of lost love and talks to my heart in ways poetry rarely does.

T.S. Eliot. His poem "Macavity: The Mystery Cat" really gets to me. It is in general about a cat who is both a part of a world that is effected by the things he does, and disassociates himself equally with the world by negating any responsibility for what he does and is never anywhere long enough to be seen. In some ways, I can relate to that cat.

Robert Frost. His poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" seems to be about the threat of a looming (winter induced) depression upon a man who has someone he wants to keep happy, but "the woods are lovely, dark and deep".

Again, I can relate to at least my interpretations of the aforementioned works.

That's all I have for now. I haven't explored them in depth but will be doing so very soon read2
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, May 4, 2011 3:38:13 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
Easy. Jim Morrison. flower
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, May 4, 2011 5:14:06 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
David Foster Wallace, Richard Brautigan, and Kurt Vonnegut.
82tigress
Posted: Friday, May 6, 2011 7:53:25 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 5/2/2011
Posts: 859
Location: His closet
Marquis de Sade ... truly one of the most brilliant minds of his day

"When it comes down to it, I let them think what they want. If they care enough to bother with what I do, then I'm already better than them." -Marilyn Monroe
Guest
Posted: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 8:31:20 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 819,716
ghost_writer wrote:
Easy. Jim Morrison. flower


I am so with you ghost_writer, James Douglas Morrison occasion5
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.