Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Phrases you wish people would get right Options · View
MRH
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 2:40:13 PM

Rank: Rookie Scribe

Joined: 8/16/2011
Posts: 4
Shotgun011 wrote:
MRH wrote:
"I could care less" (Are you sure you could not care less?)

"A flag at half mast" (It's probably at half staff to get technical)

"Orientated" (They mean oriented)

"Bounced off of...." (No, it bounced off)

"Can I axe you a question" (A question such as "How do you pronounce 'ask'?)

Continually and continuously used to mean two different things, they don't any more.

etc.


Half Mast is correct and comes from the Navy about the colors at half mast.



Half mast is correct. If it's on a mast. Technically, on a flag pole (on the ground), it is at half staff.
clum
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 5:55:56 PM

Rank: Clumeleon
Moderator

Joined: 5/13/2011
Posts: 5,834
Location: Scotland
"Off the beat and track." Grr. If people stopped and read that back, they would realise that it makes almost no sense.

Guest
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 6:20:38 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
Ten of the most commonly mis-quoted phrases in the UK
(hey, it's in the Telegraph, it MUST be true!!)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/4799157/Damp-Squid-The-top-10-misquoted-phrases-in-Britain.html

The top ten misquotes by British people are as follows:

1) A damp squid (a damp squib)

2) On tender hooks (on tenter hooks)

3) Nip it in the butt (nip it in the bud)

4) Champing at the bit (chomping at the bit)

5) A mute point (a moot point)

6) One foul swoop (one fell swoop)

7) All that glitters is not gold (all that glisters is not gold)

8) Adverse to (averse to)

9) Batting down the hatches (batten down the hatches)

10) Find a penny pick it up (find a pin pick it up)

DirtyMartini
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 6:43:31 PM

Rank: Purveyor of Poetry & Porn

Joined: 10/19/2009
Posts: 5,910
Location: Right here on Lush Stories..., United States
mazza wrote:
Ten of the most commonly mis-quoted phrases in the UK
(hey, it's in the Telegraph, it MUST be true!!)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/4799157/Damp-Squid-The-top-10-misquoted-phrases-in-Britain.html

The top ten misquotes by British people are as follows:

1) A damp squid (a damp squib)

2) On tender hooks (on tenter hooks)

3) Nip it in the butt (nip it in the bud)

4) Champing at the bit (chomping at the bit)

5) A mute point (a moot point)

6) One foul swoop (one fell swoop)

7) All that glitters is not gold (all that glisters is not gold)

8) Adverse to (averse to)

9) Batting down the hatches (batten down the hatches)

10) Find a penny pick it up (find a pin pick it up)



That was interesting...Number 1 I have never heard of in my life...and 7 and 10 I'm guilty of myself...


You know you want it, you know you need it bad...get it now on Amazon.com...
Lush Erotica, an Anthology of Award Winning Sex Stories

Guest
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 7:09:28 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
MRH wrote:
Shotgun011 wrote:
MRH wrote:
"I could care less" (Are you sure you could not care less?)

"A flag at half mast" (It's probably at half staff to get technical)

"Orientated" (They mean oriented)

"Bounced off of...." (No, it bounced off)

"Can I axe you a question" (A question such as "How do you pronounce 'ask'?)

Continually and continuously used to mean two different things, they don't any more.

etc.


Half Mast is correct and comes from the Navy about the colors at half mast.



Half mast is correct. If it's on a mast. Technically, on a flag pole (on the ground), it is at half staff.


goes either way. look it up
Guest
Posted: Monday, September 5, 2011 10:03:38 AM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
10 items or less.
That makes me cringe every time. It's '10 items or fewer' and no one seems to get it right.
You're supposed to use 'less' for uncountable mass nouns (water, air, flour, etc.) and 'fewer' for count nouns (cats, computers, shoes, items, and so on)

Oh, and: No dogs please.
Unfair generalisation, many dogs do please.
Someone needs to learn how to use a comma.
Jingle
Posted: Monday, September 5, 2011 11:15:21 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 164
Location: In my favourite blankey.
LeFabuleuxDestin wrote:

Oh, and: No dogs please.
Unfair generalisation, many dogs do please.
Someone needs to learn how to use a comma.


lol You're right. I never noticed this one before, but now I'll think of it every time I see a sign. evil4

WellMadeMale
Posted: Monday, September 5, 2011 12:43:34 PM

Rank: Constant Gardener

Joined: 9/30/2009
Posts: 10,858
Location: Cakeland, United States
It is: Shit or get off the pot... Not: Shit or get off my cot.

It is: He couldn't find his ass with both hands and a head start... or: He couldn't find his ass if you gave him directions... Not: He couldn't find his ass with his head up it.

It is: I'm busier than a one armed grocery bagger... Not: I'm busier than a one armed jerkoff artist.

I'll have a few more, later thish evening affter a few more brewskeze drunken



Obscenity is the last refuge of an inarticulate motherfucker.
DirtyMartini
Posted: Monday, September 5, 2011 6:20:30 PM

Rank: Purveyor of Poetry & Porn

Joined: 10/19/2009
Posts: 5,910
Location: Right here on Lush Stories..., United States
WellMadeMale wrote:
It is: Shit or get off the pot... Not: Shit or get off my cot.



I always thought the correct phrase was "This pot is shit, glad we didn't buy a lot"...

Shows you what I know...Regaeman Man

And you say you have more? Take your time there buddy...


You know you want it, you know you need it bad...get it now on Amazon.com...
Lush Erotica, an Anthology of Award Winning Sex Stories

Guest
Posted: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 6:02:10 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
Technically not a phrase, but it annoys me when people use of/off interchangeably. A phrase that irks me is "I would of..
" instead of "I would HAVE..." ah and yet another thing, again not a phrase, but I'm having a good rant here, so excuse me, is the improper use of ellipsis... Three dots will suffice, thank you!
Jingle
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 2:11:53 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 164
Location: In my favourite blankey.
One that I've noticed on different occasions and that I don't remember seeing here is...

Mute point. d'oh! Moot point is correct.

charmbrights
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2011 4:01:39 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 197
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
Please will (or even "can") someone explain in what way the meaning is changed when someone writes "meet up", or even "meet up with" instead of simply "meet"? I find it hard to believe that the prepositions add anything to this verb.

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) via charmbrights@yahoo.co.uk
Mistress_of_words
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2011 7:50:56 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 2/14/2011
Posts: 591
Location: At my keyboard, writing stories for you
charmbrights wrote:
Please will (or even "can") someone explain in what way the meaning is changed when someone writes "meet up", or even "meet up with" instead of simply "meet"? I find it hard to believe that the prepositions add anything to this verb.


That's an interesting one. It's just something that has developed in colloquial spoken language, I think. I have a few observations, but no explanations to offer:

Personally I think it tends to be applied more frequently to pre-arranged social activities, rather than the action of meeting a new person:

Let's meet up at the bowling alley.
I met up with this girl for lunch.
Etc.
vs
I met a girl at the movies.
I was looking forward to meeting him.

Also, I think meet up tends to be used more commonly with the WE/US/THEY pronouns. While meet on its own is more often used with singular pronouns:

We should meet up. Let's meet up.
They met up with...
vs
I'll meet you at..
Where do you want to meet?

I'm aware of the possibility I may be talking bollocks, lol.

charmbrights
Posted: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:01:47 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 197
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
Mistress_of_words wrote:
charmbrights wrote:
Please will (or even "can") someone explain in what way the meaning is changed when someone writes "meet up", or even "meet up with" instead of simply "meet"? I find it hard to believe that the prepositions add anything to this verb.


That's an interesting one. It's just something that has developed in colloquial spoken language, I think. I have a few observations, but no explanations to offer:

Personally I think it tends to be applied more frequently to pre-arranged social activities, rather than the action of meeting a new person:

Let's meet up at the bowling alley.
I met up with this girl for lunch.
Etc.
vs
I met a girl at the movies.
I was looking forward to meeting him.

Also, I think meet up tends to be used more commonly with the WE/US/THEY pronouns. While meet on its own is more often used with singular pronouns:

We should meet up. Let's meet up.
They met up with...
vs
I'll meet you at..
Where do you want to meet?

I'm aware of the possibility I may be talking bollocks, lol.
I have no objection to anything "in colloquial spoken language" (even "well wicked") but I was specifically thinking of written work, and especially fiction.

Perhaps I too may "be talking bollocks", but somehow I think an author has a duty to write proper English, and to report direct speech as it really is. For example someone living near me affirming the performance of an activity and approval of the result may well say, "She do do that! Tidy!" yet the same person would not dream of writing the same words.




News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) via charmbrights@yahoo.co.uk
charmbrights
Posted: Friday, September 23, 2011 1:19:45 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 197
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
Writers who put:

"Xxxxx," he thought to himself.

(or the female equivalent).

Other than in Sci-Fi, to whom else could (s)he be thinking?

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) via charmbrights@yahoo.co.uk
DirtyMartini
Posted: Friday, September 23, 2011 1:52:29 AM

Rank: Purveyor of Poetry & Porn

Joined: 10/19/2009
Posts: 5,910
Location: Right here on Lush Stories..., United States
charmbrights wrote:


For example someone living near me affirming the performance of an activity and approval of the result may well say, "She do do that! Tidy!" yet the same person would not dream of writing the same words.



Of course, and this has probably been mentioned before...it would be perfectly acceptable to write that as part of dialogue...the rules of grammar are often tossed when they are between quotation marks, and rightly so...

When I first started writing back in 2009, I had read a couple of articles on erotic writing and one of them was about the appropriateness of dialogue...

While it may be perfectly acceptable for a young kid in a club to say something like, "That shit's the bomb"...you would not normally expect the CEO of a Fortune 500 company to talk like that at a board meeting, and your stories should reflect that...

And while that may seem perfectly obvious to you or I...don't assume anything to be obvious to all writers...I've seen more than my share of indiscretions in this area...

Just saying...happy8


You know you want it, you know you need it bad...get it now on Amazon.com...
Lush Erotica, an Anthology of Award Winning Sex Stories

Guest
Posted: Friday, September 23, 2011 7:12:38 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
_mal_ wrote:
Not really a phrase, but still something that irks me...

"that that"

Technically, it's correct in English (I suppose... I don't know of anything that says it's incorrect) but it always makes my mind stumble over the sentence (and mouth, if I read aloud). I usually have to backtrack and reread the sentence to make sure it's correct or that the person hasn't made a typo or some other grammar error.

It happens to me very occasionally and I always rewrite the sentence. I wish others would do the same.

It's a weird thing. We find ourselves writing it but logically we know a "that that" isn't necessary -- we can say the same thing using one "that" or none at all. I say axe it.


I remember encountering this in a babysitters' club book. I couldn't hold back the chuckle. It tickled me. I can honestly say I haven't noticed it since, even though it IS awkward.
Guest
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 1:39:42 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
Emimeni wrote:
_mal_ wrote:
Not really a phrase, but still something that irks me...

"that that"

Technically, it's correct in English (I suppose... I don't know of anything that says it's incorrect) but it always makes my mind stumble over the sentence (and mouth, if I read aloud). I usually have to backtrack and reread the sentence to make sure it's correct or that the person hasn't made a typo or some other grammar error.

It happens to me very occasionally and I always rewrite the sentence. I wish others would do the same.

It's a weird thing. We find ourselves writing it but logically we know a "that that" isn't necessary -- we can say the same thing using one "that" or none at all. I say axe it.


I remember encountering this in a babysitters' club book. I couldn't hold back the chuckle. It tickled me. I can honestly say I haven't noticed it since, even though it IS awkward.


I'm guilty of "that that" (He thought that that sort of behaviour was inappropriate...") AND "had had" (Jenni had had Justin before, at a drunken pool party the previous year...) I don't do it consciously and it always irks me when I notice it afterward(s)!!!!!

Two HOWLERS that are quite common in Ireland, though exclusively in spoken English, are the the use of the word 'Pacific' for 'Specific'... (I pacifically told him that the report had to be in by today...) and 'Serious' for 'Series'... (The Walking Dead is the best zombie TV serious ever made....)

(Years ago, when I worked as a waiter in an Italian restaurant, I was flabbergasted when a middle-aged couple, who looked liked they didn't dine out often, asked for a bottle of the "Pea Knot Gree-Gee-Oh..." Returning with the bottle of wine I uncorked it with a flourish and announced, with a perfect Italian intonation, "Your Pinot Grigio, Sir..." And the guy looked at me like he wanted to cut my throat and his wife blushed.... And I Was Trying To Be Nice!!!!!!)

xx SF
JellyTug
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 11:32:48 AM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 10/11/2011
Posts: 11
Location: Mesa
YOU'RE as in YOU ARE and YOUR as in YOUR UMBRELLA.
So freakin annoying

JellyTug!!!!
LoboSolo
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 11:17:30 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 3/9/2010
Posts: 16
LeFabuleuxDestin wrote:
10 items or less.
That makes me cringe every time. It's '10 items or fewer' and no one seems to get it right.
You're supposed to use 'less' for uncountable mass nouns (water, air, flour, etc.) and 'fewer' for count nouns (cats, computers, shoes, items, and so on)


Yea, that one is annoying.

Ferþu hal!
LoboSolo
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 11:19:39 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 3/9/2010
Posts: 16
JellyTug wrote:
YOU'RE as in YOU ARE and YOUR as in YOUR UMBRELLA.
So freakin annoying


I make typos all the time ... That's an eath one to make!

Ferþu hal!
LoboSolo
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 11:24:31 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 3/9/2010
Posts: 16
One of my pet peeves is the improper use of the reflexive pronouns ... myself and yourself.
"How are you?"
"Fine ... and yourself?" Arrgghh ... Should be YOU!

John, Mary, and myself were at the meeting. .... Arrgghh ... John, Mary, and I ...

Another one that I just recently heard for the first time: "honing in" ... It's "homing in"! You can hone your skills but you home in a target.

Ferþu hal!
sbp
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 8:03:10 PM

Rank: Active Ink Slinger

Joined: 8/17/2011
Posts: 28
Lazy speech, "like," and "init" and "ya know what I mean"

If I do understand what 'ya' mean will 'ya' go home?
charmbrights
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 9:13:03 AM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 197
Location: Tirphil, United Kingdom
LeFabuleuxDestin wrote:
... Oh, and: No dogs please.
Unfair generalisation, many dogs do please. ...
Of course on the Underground (=Subway [transport, not the food], or Metro) in London there is a market opportunity if the authorities ever decide to enforce the By-law which says "Dogs must be carried on the escalator".

News of ALL my novels (and where to get free copies) via charmbrights@yahoo.co.uk
DLizze
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 4:06:31 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,569
slaverly wrote:
I hate it when people (mostly news broadcasters) us the word "pleaded" instead of plead.

I have always thought the past tense of "plead" is "pled" but what do I know? I was not an English major in college, and I am an American. That means I have two strikes against me, when it comes to proper usage.

MY most recent pet peeve is overuse of "notice(d)".
In my mind, "notice" ia a noun:
"King John put up a notice:
Lost, Stolen or Strayed
James James Morrison's mother
Seems to have been mislaid" (thank you, A.A. Milne)

There are so many other verbs that can be used to describe seeing. Or, if "notice" is used as a verb, it should be to change emphasis. Rather than simply seeing, one notices (or not):

Although she was beautiful, and beckoning the officer with a "come hither" stare, he couldn't help observing that the tags on her Aston Martin were out of date.
"Did you see that?" he asked his partner. "Her tags are expired."
"No, I didn't notice." Replied his partner, as he continued to gaze at her erect nipples, their profile softened by the sheer blouse.
Clearly, his thoughts at that moment were not on the job.
She looked down. Noting the bulge in his uniform, she smiled.

It especially irks me when someone glances and notices. When I glance, I get a fleeting look at something. It is rarely sufficient to make note of it.



"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
Guest
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:58:15 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 816,693
Jingle wrote:
One that I've noticed on different occasions and that I don't remember seeing here is...

Mute point. d'oh! Moot point is correct.



I hate "mute point", the same people always say "jest" instead of gist! Worse yet they spell it out that way never knowing the original word and of course spell-check isn't going to ever alert them.

one of the interesting ones is "parting shot" which I read came from the original "Parthian shot" after the famous Parthian horsemen who learned to shoot accurately over their shoulders on retreat.
Danand
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 9:29:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 10/11/2011
Posts: 59
Location: Newcastle
I have issues with people who say "In one foul swoop" It is "In one fell swoop"...the metaphor being that of a raptor or other bird of prey diving on their quarry. the impression is meant to be of a quick, clean successful action, not a messy and underhand one, as "foul" implies.

It's also become commonplace here (Australia) for people so say "Supposably" rather than "Supposedly".

And you know you've got a right twat on the hook when they say "at the end of the day"

"At the end of the day" has no right version. It is like "Getting back into the zone" They are both phrases which have no place at all in sentient human communications.

I've also noticed that a lot of Americans, primarily from the Midwest I think, say "then" in place of "than". They will oftentimes even type "then" as in
"The Democratic party is better to poor people then the Republican Party is."

So they must really think that's the correct grammar to use. Here in Australia they have taken to taking the "t" out of 'Important" and replacing it with a "d". it is now more common to pronounce it incorrectly than correctly. because they keep hearing one another do it. I am such a language Nazi I know, but it sets my teeth on edge.

"It's really impordant that we compete on a global level" I actually heard one financial commentator say on the news a while back.

I would suggest it is very important for a highly paid television journalist to know how to speak properly, but apprently the Netwrok people don't agree with me.

cussing
Thank you for letting me vent that. They are things which have been bothering me a long time.

“No drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.”
― P.J. O'Rourke
DLizze
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 11:31:47 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,569
Here's more on the subject of eggregious word choices. I need to rant about the use of "that" in reference to people. Unles one means "that person, as opposed to another", the proper usage is "who".

e.g. I am the person who called yesterday. NOT: I am the person that called yesterday.

"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
DLizze
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 11:37:19 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 4/23/2011
Posts: 2,569
MRH posted: "Orientated" (They mean oriented)

An ogden nash-like bit of doggerel comes to mind:

Those who say, "orientated"
Have misstated
And should be berated.

"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
Danand
Posted: Saturday, November 5, 2011 3:06:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Wordsmith

Joined: 10/11/2011
Posts: 59
Location: Newcastle
I just remembered my all time favourite Winston Churchill quote regarding proper English usage. In reference to the commonplace but technically incorrect practice of ending a sentence with a preposition he said:

"That is the kind of pedantic nitpicking, up with which I will not put."



“No drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.”
― P.J. O'Rourke
Users browsing this topic
Guest 


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.6 (NET v4.0) - 11/14/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.