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Father punishes daughter for her rant on Facebook. Options · View
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:03:49 PM

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LittleBambi wrote:


No one here is doubting that. People are merely stating their view from where they are - on the other side of this guy being some kind of online parenting 'hero'. I don't think anyone is claiming that he's 'violent' either. I think people, myself included, were just pointing out that his behaviour was, while amusing from an outsider's point of view, childish. And, to be frank, not good re example setting.


I'm sure due to the online fanfare and cheering, parents all around the country are loading up their guns and getting ready to do some target practice on their children's possessions the next time they mouth-off or step out of line.

I totally agree... setting him up as a "tough love" Parenting Hero will probably lead to some disasters to come that we'll all hear about in the news.



lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:07:05 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:


I'm sure due to the online fanfare and cheering, parents all around the country are loading up their guns and getting ready to do some target practice on their children's possessions the next time they mouth-off or step out of line.

I totally agree... setting him up as a "tough love" Parenting Hero will probably lead to some disasters to come that we'll all hear about in the news.


I doubt one isolated incident is going to set off a global epidemic of laptop warfare.





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
1curiouscat
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:07:39 PM

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lafayettemister wrote:




That is great! hilarious stuff. Gotta love that shit. This kid will be laughing about this one day. (if he has a sense of humour). Today I bet he is pissed off though, just like the daughter.





Overwhelming Reality

From Across the Room
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:14:44 PM

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lafayettemister wrote:


Above it was mentioned....

"oh, and if he thinks putting a bullet thru her computer is reasonable, what makes you think he's not one step away from getting so angry that he's going to smack her next time? it's just one small step away."


I must have missed that - perhaps I was just speaking from my own, personal, point of view then.

Regardless, I am absolutely not worried about the safety of teenagers' laptops around the world, after all, if anyone attempted to touch mine they'd be the ones whose safety I would fear for... but, back to the point, the only point that I am trying to make on this post is that this parent's behaviour in response to his kid's behaviour was as childish as the behaviour to which he was responding to.

Maybe my opinion is invalid to a lost of people reading this I am, after all, just a 19 year old girl....but kids are what you make them to be. More often than not a child's actions are a reflection on their parenting. That's not to say that this girl has had bad parenting at the hands of this man but, simply, that he and the 'mother' and 'step mother' clearly haven't done enough to teach this girl what it is to value what others do for you in your life. Specifically, here, what your parents do for you.

Yes, teenagers rebel, I've definitely disappeared off the face of the earth for a couple of days when I've been pissed off with my mum but I would never, ever, ever have written a statement such as that girl did. Ever.
wolverine15
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:24:18 PM

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Oh cheery the non parents criticizing the parents. Really I could delve into the philosophy of natural consequence behavior and discipline, and go on about how yes the child chose the medium of their ill behavior and thus the parent disciplined in the same medium and offer justification. However, I don't have to justify a parents right to discipline a child. If anything I find it ingenious and creative, and absolutely certain that the message was received and fairly certain that particular type of activity will not occur again.

And to touch on a few comments from other:
He better be prepared for what is to come - uh yeah it is called parenting.

what makes you think he's not one step away from getting so angry that he's going to smack her next time? - yes because that is the natural progression of things, kinda like the domino theory and communism?

He could of donated it. Shooting it was completely unnecessary. - well being as that he bought it he can do whatever he wants with his own property.

And LM covered DD's diatribe about tough love and the potential epidemic that might sweep the world.

What I will end with are 2 thoughts:

1. Get real. Getting through to children is some times difficult. This parent cares enough (ok I will give you he might be pissed off enough) to make an effort and demonstrate a natural consequence to his child.

2. PEOPLE GET FUCKING REAL. HE SAID IN THE VIDEO HE WORKS IN IT. DO YOU THINK THAT MAYBE JUST MAYBE HE DIDNT REALLY SHOOT THE REAL COMPUTER?







“If you find it hard to laugh at yourself, I would be happy to do it for you."

lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:24:32 PM

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LittleBambi wrote:


I must have missed that - perhaps I was just speaking from my own, personal, point of view then.

Regardless, I am absolutely not worried about the safety of teenagers' laptops around the world, after all, if anyone attempted to touch mine they'd be the ones whose safety I would fear for... but, back to the point, the only point that I am trying to make on this post is that this parent's behaviour in response to his kid's behaviour was as childish as the behaviour to which he was responding to.

Maybe my opinion is invalid to a lost of people reading this I am, after all, just a 19 year old girl....but kids are what you make them to be. More often than not a child's actions are a reflection on their parenting. That's not to say that this girl has had bad parenting at the hands of this man but, simply, that he and the 'mother' and 'step mother' clearly haven't done enough to teach this girl what it is to value what others do for you in your life. Specifically, here, what your parents do for you.

Yes, teenagers rebel, I've definitely disappeared off the face of the earth for a couple of days when I've been pissed off with my mum but I would never, ever, ever have written a statement such as that girl did. Ever.


Good point. We don't know what has happened in this family before. All teens, despite the best parenting in the world are going to have off days. Days when they get frustrated and say or do something in oppostion of what they were taught. Doesn't mean the kid is a write-off and useless. Doesn't mean the parents were totallly ineffective in parenting. Maybe this was bad parenting, but parents aren't perfect either. This may have been a last resort to get through... who knows. He may not be a hero, but he isn't a goat either.





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:27:01 PM

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lafayettemister wrote:


Good point. We don't know what has happened in this family before. All teens, despite the best parenting in the world are going to have off days. Days when they get frustrated and say or do something in oppostion of what they were taught. Doesn't mean the kid is a write-off and useless. Doesn't mean the parents were totallly ineffective in parenting. Maybe this was bad parenting, but parents aren't perfect either. This may have been a last resort to get through... who knows. He may not be a hero, but he isn't a goat either.


I agree...as I said above, I agree with his motives and with the point he was trying to get across...just not the way in which he was doing it. That's all happy8
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:28:41 PM

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wolverine15 wrote:
Oh cheery the non parents criticizing the parents.






I wondered how long it would be before someone came out with this. You're right. God forbid that anyone who hasn't given away half their DNA has an opinion! Awful of us to even comment, just awful. angry7
Dudealicious
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:38:41 PM

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Just one thing I am not sure has been mentioned on this thread as of yet.

This was not the first time this girl had done this she had been grounded for "three months" the last time she did it. Now it happens a second time, if I was her dad being called out like that I would be super pissed.

Maybe the father went too far, but he can't repeatedly take these public bashings either. He did in his eyes what he had to do.

The night that changed my life, a four part series of a married man lusting after his co-worker

wolverine15
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:42:40 PM

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LittleBambi wrote:


I wondered how long it would be before someone came out with this. You're right. God forbid that anyone who hasn't given away half their DNA has an opinion! Awful of us to even comment, just awful. angry7


Oh yes and you just assumed that my tone was negative? Well ok it was, but my slant was more that the forum was shaping up as parents vs non parents.

So "giving away half their DNA" is what you define as a parent? Really, I would define it as somebody that has somebody else's complete well being in their hands. Somebody that allays fears at night, and for the love god might actually discipline them so that they learn from their mistakes.

And for the record I sincerely welcome everybodies opinion - no really I do - no seriously really I welcome everybodies opinion - really. Not. But I do respect that they have it.

“If you find it hard to laugh at yourself, I would be happy to do it for you."

TheDevilsWeakness
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:42:48 PM

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wolverine15 wrote:
Oh cheery the non parents criticizing the parents. Really I could delve into the philosophy of natural consequence behavior and discipline, and go on about how yes the child chose the medium of their ill behavior and thus the parent disciplined in the same medium and offer justification. However, I don't have to justify a parents right to discipline a child. If anything I find it ingenious and creative, and absolutely certain that the message was received and fairly certain that particular type of activity will not occur again.

And to touch on a few comments from other:
He better be prepared for what is to come - uh yeah it is called parenting.

what makes you think he's not one step away from getting so angry that he's going to smack her next time? - yes because that is the natural progression of things, kinda like the domino theory and communism?

He could of donated it. Shooting it was completely unnecessary. - well being as that he bought it he can do whatever he wants with his own property.

And LM covered DD's diatribe about tough love and the potential epidemic that might sweep the world.

What I will end with are 2 thoughts:

1. Get real. Getting through to children is some times difficult. This parent cares enough (ok I will give you he might be pissed off enough) to make an effort and demonstrate a natural consequence to his child.

2. PEOPLE GET FUCKING REAL. HE SAID IN THE VIDEO HE WORKS IN IT. DO YOU THINK THAT MAYBE JUST MAYBE HE DIDNT REALLY SHOOT THE REAL COMPUTER?







hello1 notworthy

Dudealicious
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:52:10 PM

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wolverine15 wrote:


So "giving away half their DNA" is what you define as a parent? Really, I would define it as somebody that has somebody else's complete well being in their hands. Somebody that allays fears at night, and for the love god might actually discipline them so that they learn from their mistakes.


Thanks man, I consider myself a parent and have never had a child. I do have one through my current relationship. Let me tell you I experience all of these feelings.

As for being the disciplinarian I am the one that has that job in the house and have never once heard "but you're not my dad". Guess I am doing something right.

The night that changed my life, a four part series of a married man lusting after his co-worker

Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:55:27 PM

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LittleBambi wrote:


I wondered how long it would be before someone came out with this. You're right. God forbid that anyone who hasn't given away half their DNA has an opinion! Awful of us to even comment, just awful. angry7



DNA has nothing to do with it at all. What if we've adopted our children? It's the parenting experience itself that we've done day in and day out. I have a very different idea about parenting now that I AM a parent than I did when I was not a parent. Of course everyone's opinion and input is important, but I think it can be very different when you're actually doing the job 24 hours a day.

My kids get as much privacy and respect as they earn. As far as I can see, that girl doesn't deserve a whole lot of either. Don't know how it came to be that way, we can only see about 7 minutes of their lives in that video.
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:57:09 PM

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wolverine15 wrote:


So "giving away half their DNA" is what you define as a parent? Really, I would define it as somebody that has somebody else's complete well being in their hands. Somebody that allays fears at night, and for the love god might actually discipline them so that they learn from their mistakes.



I fail to see how you didn't see my entire post as a joke. I thought I'd done a pretty good job of making that obvious.

Not even going to make a further comment on the ridiculous comment you made in your first post, to which I was responding to above.
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:58:30 PM

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Curlygirly wrote:



DNA has nothing to do with it at all. What if we've adopted our children?


Again, take a step back, re-read what I wrote...notice the tone... my apologies for not making a joke more clear. Although how I could have made it clearer I am not entirely sure.
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 12:59:54 PM

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LittleBambi wrote:


Again, take a step back, re-read what I wrote...notice the tone... my apologies for not making a joke more clear. Although how I could have made it clearer I am not entirely sure.


You're right. I missed the joke? Sometimes it's hard to set tone when you're writing.
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 1:08:19 PM

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wolverine15 wrote:
If anything I find it ingenious and creative, and absolutely certain that the message was received and fairly certain that particular type of activity will not occur again.



Absolutely certain? Clearly this is the answer, then! I'm going to buy my gun. I am convinced now. It's a wonder that parents in countries where guns are illegal are able to get through to their kids at all.

You have several "non-parents" in this thread that are relatively young and saying it wouldn't have worked out well, had we been the kids involved.

Parenting isn't a one-size-fits-all endeavour.

Did he have good intentions? Yes. Did he choose the wrong method of discipline? Yes.

Can we be "fairly certain" the girl will have 'learned her lesson' and respect her parents going forward? Not by a long shot (pun intended).

I am of the philosophy that drawing a firearms for *any reason* associated with disciplining a child is wrong.

None of us "non parents" are saying she didn't deserve consequences or discipline. We are judging his choice of discipline as wrong. Why are we judging? Because that was the question asked!

Good parenting tips can be found in Buz's post in this thread. They raised him with intelligent parenting techniques that were creative in a positive way, instead of the "if you do me wrong, I'll shoot up your stuff" approach.










wolverine15
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 1:10:36 PM

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LittleBambi wrote:


I fail to see how you didn't see my entire post as a joke. I thought I'd done a pretty good job of making that obvious.

Not even going to make a further comment on the ridiculous comment you made in your first post, to which I was responding to above.


Seeing as how I am not the only one who didn't think you were joking I guess it wasn't obvious.

As for my RIDICULOUS comment I assume that comes with your vast experience being responsible for others and your expert OPINION on the things that I know. But hey I am a dumb guy, I am sure you know far more than me. God can you ever forgive me for having a RIDICULOUS opinion and making RIDICULOUS comments?????

“If you find it hard to laugh at yourself, I would be happy to do it for you."

wolverine15
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 1:35:31 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:


Absolutely certain? Clearly this is the answer, then! I'm going to buy my gun. I am convinced now. It's a wonder that parents in countries where guns are illegal are able to get through to their kids at all.

You have several "non-parents" in this thread that are relatively young and saying it wouldn't have worked out well, had we been the kids involved.

Parenting isn't a one-size-fits-all endeavour.

Did he have good intentions? Yes. Did he choose the wrong method of discipline? Yes.

Can we be "fairly certain" the girl will have 'learned her lesson' and respect her parents going forward? Not by a long shot (pun intended).

I am of the philosophy that drawing a firearms for *any reason* associated with disciplining a child is wrong.

None of us "non parents" are saying she didn't deserve consequences or discipline. We are judging his choice of discipline as wrong. Why are we judging? Because that was the question asked!

Good parenting tips can be found in Buz's post in this thread. They raised him with intelligent parenting techniques that were creative in a positive way, instead of the "if you do me wrong, I'll shoot up your stuff" approach.


Parenting isn't a one size fits all endeavor. And I don't disagree with you per se. But it would seem your repeated use of "non parents" is at least insinuating that I am a parent or that I have a"non parent" bias. What the real issue seems to be with MOST of the "non parents" have an issue with the use of the fire arm.

“If you find it hard to laugh at yourself, I would be happy to do it for you."

lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 1:46:23 PM

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All kids are different. How a parent deals with a kid depends on the kid. I have 3 sisters. The middle of the three, the "silent assassin", was very quiet and minded her manners. Teachers loved her And she was very good at riling up the younger sister, who wore her emotions on her sleeve. The middle sister never got into any real trouble and was easy going. Younger sister was a handfull from the moment she was born. My folks were/are great parents. But they had to use a much firmer technique with the younger sister. Telling her something politely once, twice, three times would not get the job done. She needed to be told or corrected loudly, forcefully (words, not beatings) and swiftly. Otherwise it had no affect.

We all know people who at some point in their lives have said..."Oh god! I sound just like my mother/father." The first time I told one of my kids, "because I said so." I almost choked on my own words. Sounded just like my mom. My own kids have to be dealt with differently. My son, I can tell him like it is. Straight up and no nonsense. He may not like what I'm saying, but he heeds my word. My daughter on the other hand would break down in sobbing tears if I dealt with her the same way. It would be counterproductive.

Maybe this dad knows his daughter better than we do. Knows that in order to get through, you gotta go big. As mentioned above, a previous 3 month grounding for the same or similar offense did not get the point through. So, he posted this video. I tend to think that father and daughter will look back on this in 10 years and have a good laugh.






When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
Dancing_Doll
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 2:01:30 PM

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wolverine15 wrote:


Parenting isn't a one size fits all endeavor. And I don't disagree with you per se. But it would seem your repeated use of "non parents" is at least insinuating that I am a parent or that I have a"non parent" bias. What the real issue seems to be with MOST of the "non parents" have an issue with the use of the fire arm.


I know, it's weird, right? Usually having children and firearms go hand-in-hand.

I heard it's an updated chapter in Dr Spock's 2012, USA edition manual... Plus they've now added concealed weapon holsters to most diaper bags.

I'm sure the non-parents will get on board with it eventually. thumbup


ArtMan
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 2:07:16 PM

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The daughter needs to be punished but what she does not need is for her father to be acting as immature as she is.

His language is not suitable for a father raising a daughter and he is not demonstrating safe use of a firearm. His example is very poor.

This may be the tip of the iceberg of a very dysfunctional family.

You are invited to read Passionate Danger, Part II, a story collaboration by Kim and ArtMan.
http://www.lushstories.com/stories/straight-sex/passionate-danger-part-ii.aspx

wolverine15
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 2:29:33 PM

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Dancing_Doll wrote:


I know, it's weird, right? Usually having children and firearms go hand-in-hand.

I heard it's an updated chapter in Dr Spock's 2012, USA edition manual... Plus they've now added concealed weapon holsters to most diaper bags.

I'm sure the non-parents will get on board with it eventually. thumbup


My understanding is that the NRA is rolling out your aforementioned diaper bag.Sword Fight

“If you find it hard to laugh at yourself, I would be happy to do it for you."

Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 3:01:07 PM

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Holy shit! If I ever disrespected my parents that way, they would've kicked me from here to China. That kid had it coming!
DLizze
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 3:43:41 PM

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I thnik he went overboard. One round would have been sufficient. :-)

Seriously, though, his behavior is just as childish as his daughter's, if for no other reason than he was unable to keep it private. So far as I am concerned, just that says a great deal about his "people skills", or lack thereof. I was not at all surprised to hear him say that he was in IT. That is exactly where he belongs, because he clearly lacks the necessary skills for dealing with people.



"There's only three tempos: slow, medium and fast. When you get between in the cracks, ain't nuthin' happenin'." Ben Webster
LusciousLola
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 3:58:47 PM

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# five chiming in here.

What an ass, is the first thing I thought when watching this. Then, I start thinking how he kept talking about how disrespectful she was. Now, isn't that the pot calling the kettle black? It's usually the ones that are crying that they aren't respected that are the most disrespectful of others. He was childishly trying to make the point to her that he is in control. I fully agree that he had valid points, but the way he handled it is more likely to cause greater problems for his relationship with his daughter than this letter.
lafayettemister
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 4:27:19 PM

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Dad interviewed by Toronto Star... with responses from the daughter...

Media Response to Anita Li, from the Toronto Star

Since you took the time to email us with your requests like we asked, I’ll take the time to give you an honest follow-up response. You’ll have to forgive me for doing so publicly though; again I want to be sure my words are portrayed the way I actually say them, not cut together to make entirely different points.

Your questions were:
Q: Why did you decide to reprimand your daughter over a public medium like YouTube?

A: Well, I actually just had to load the video file itself on YouTube because it’s a better upload process than Facebook, but the intended audience was her Facebook friends and the parents of those friends who saw her post and would naturally assume we let our children get away with something like that. So, to answer “Why did you reprimand her over a public medium like Facebook” my answer is this: Because that’s how I was raised. If I did something embarrassing to my parents in public (such as a grocery store) I got my tail tore up right there in front of God and everyone, right there in the store. I put the reprisal in exactly the same medium she did, in the exact same manner. Her post went out to about 452 people. Mine went out to about 550 people… originally. I had no idea it would become what it did.

Q: How effective do you think your punishment was (i.e. shooting her laptop and reading her letter online)?

A: I think it was very effective on one front. She apparently didn’t remember being talked to about previous incidents, nor did she seem to remember the effects of having it taken away, nor did the eventual long-term grounding seem to get through to her. I think she thought “Well, I’ll just wait it out and I’ll get it back eventually.” Her behavior corrected for a short time, and then it went back to what it was before and worse. This time, she won’t ever forget and it’ll be a long time before she has an opportunity to post on Facebook again. I feel pretty certain that every day from then to now, whenever one of her friends mentions Facebook, she’ll remember it and wish she hadn’t done what she did.

The second lesson I want her to learn is the value of a dollar. We don’t give her everything she asks for, but you can all imagine what it’s like being the only grandchild and the first child. Presents and money come from all sides when you’re young. Most of the things she has that are “cool” were bought or gifted that way. She’s always asked for very few things, but they’re always high-dollar things (iPod, laptop, smartphone, etc). Eventually she gets given enough money to get them. That’s not learning the value of a dollar. Its knowing how to save money, which I greatly applaud in her, but it’s not enough. She wants a digital SLR camera. She wants a 22 rifle like mine. She wants a car. She wants a smart phone with a data package and unlimited texting. (I have to hear about that one every week!)

She thinks all these things are supposed to be given to her because she’s got parents. It’s not going to happen, at least not in our house. She can get a job and work for money just like everyone else. Then she can spend it on anything she wants (within reason). If she wants to work for two months to save enough to purchase a $1000 SLR camera with an $800 lens, then I can guarantee she’ll NEVER leave it outside at night. She’ll be careful when she puts it away and carries it around. She’ll value it much more because she worked so hard to get it. Instead, with the current way things have been given to her, she's on about her fourth phone and just expects another one when she breaks the one she has. She's not sorry about breaking it, or losing it, she's sorry only because she can't text her friends. I firmly believe she'll be a LOT more careful when she has to buy her own $299.00 Motorola Razr smartphone.

Until then, she can do chores, and lots and lots of them, so the people who ARE feeding her, clothing her, paying for all her school trips, paying for her musical instruments, can have some time to relax after they finish working to support her and the rest of the family. She can either work to make money on her own, or she will do chores to contribute around the house. She’s known all along that all she has to do is get a job and a lot of these chores will go away. But if you’re too lazy to work even to get things you want for yourself, I’m certainly not going to let you sit idly on your rear-end with your face glued to both the TV and Facebook for 5 to 6 hours per night. Those days are over.

Q: How did your daughter respond to the video and to what happened to her laptop?

A: She responded to the video with “I can’t believe you shot my computer!” That was the first thing she said when she found out about it. Then we sat and we talked for quite a long while on the back patio about the things she did, the things I did in response, etc.

Later after she’d had time to process it and I’d had time to process her thoughts on the matters we discussed, we were back to a semi-truce… you know that uncomfortable moment when you’re in the kitchen with your child after an argument and you’re both waiting to see which one’s going to cave in and resume normal conversation first? Yeah, that moment. I told her about the video response and about it going viral and about the consequences it could have on our family for the next couple of days and asked if she wanted to see some of the comments people had made. After the first few hundred comments, she was astounded with the responses.

People were telling her she was going to commit suicide, commit a gun-related crime, become a drug addict, drop out of school, get pregnant on purpose, and become a stripper because she’s too emotionally damaged now to be a productive member of society. Apparently stripper was the job-choice of most of the commenters. Her response was “Dude… it’s only a computer. I mean, yeah I’m mad but pfft.” She actually asked me to post a comment on one of the threads (and I did) asking what other job fields the victims of laptop-homicide were eligible for because she wasn’t too keen on the stripping thing.

We agreed we learned two collective lessons from this so far:

First: As her father, I’ll definitely do what I say I will, both positive and negative and she can depend on that. She no longer has any doubt about that.

Second: We have always told her what you put online can affect you forever. Years later a single Facebook/MySpace/Twitter comment can affect her eligibility for a good job and can even get her fired from a job she already has. She’s seen first-hand through this video the worst possible scenario that can happen. One post, made by her Dad, will probably follow him the rest of his life; just like those mean things she said on Facebook will stick with the people her words hurt for a long time to come. Once you put it out there, you can’t take it back, so think carefully before you use the internet to broadcast your thoughts and feelings.

=====================

I say again and truly believe it... he's a great dad.





When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser. Socrates
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 4:36:10 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 784,659
I think he dealt with it as she chose to deal with her chores. She published an open letter addressed to her parents but didn't have the guts to say it to them or let them read it. So her punishment should be just as public. Obviously from what he says, all of her friends think she's the shits for doing it. Sounds like she's been warned before about taking it to FB and she didn't learn from the grounding that she got. She wants an iPod, new software, cell phone etc. and not lift a finger to get it. If she needs a computer for school she can go to the library. The public one as well as the schools.
Guest
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 4:42:49 PM

Rank: Lurker

Joined: 12/1/2006
Posts: 784,659
Your post beat mine. evil4 You're right. He's a good dad. If there were more like him the kids around wouldn't be as messed up as they are. The little darlings.
Nikki703
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2012 5:05:35 PM

Rank: Forum Guru

Joined: 8/7/2009
Posts: 14,353
Location: The Other Side Of The Mirror
Well I guess I too am in the minority. As a parent, I think what the daughter did was pretty childish and I can understand the father being upset about it. But he could have, no should have dealt with it in private. The guy may be a good parent, I dont know if he is or isnt, but to do that was just as childish as what his daughter did. Maybe the acorn doesnt roll to far from the tree.

I see a reality show coming from this!!!
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